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bryhamm

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Grilled some "Chuck-Eye" steaks today (also known as the "poor-man's ribeye"). Mixed reviews. Parts of the cut were fantastic - almost Filet like. Other parts were tough - like Sirloin or worse. Would I buy them again? I'm not sure. Significant savings over Ribeyes but not nearly as good overall.

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Grilled some "Chuck-Eye" steaks today (also known as the "poor-man's ribeye"). Mixed reviews. Parts of the cut were fantastic - almost Filet like. Other parts were tough - like Sirloin or worse. Would I buy them again? I'm not sure. Significant savings over Ribeyes but not nearly as good overall.

A chuckeye is basically a ribeye without the money muscle that goes around the steaks cut from the first five ribs on the cow. The Chuckeye comes from the 6th rib which means there are generally only 2 per cow (four if cut really thin, but then what's the point of having the steak?).

The last time I got them, they were $5.99/pound as opposed to $13.99 at that same grocery store. I'll take that all day long and seek them out to stow in the freezer. With the way beef prices are going to rocket up this year, get all the Chuckeyes you can...

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Grilled some "Chuck-Eye" steaks today (also known as the "poor-man's ribeye"). Mixed reviews. Parts of the cut were fantastic - almost Filet like. Other parts were tough - like Sirloin or worse. Would I buy them again? I'm not sure. Significant savings over Ribeyes but not nearly as good overall.

A chuckeye is basically a ribeye without the money muscle that goes around the steaks cut from the first five ribs on the cow. The Chuckeye comes from the 6th rib which means there are generally only 2 per cow (four if cut really thin, but then what's the point of having the steak?).

The last time I got them, they were $5.99/pound as opposed to $13.99 at that same grocery store. I'll take that all day long and seek them out to stow in the freezer. With the way beef prices are going to rocket up this year, get all the Chuckeyes you can...

Any tips on prepping a Chcukeye vs. a Ribeye? Or would you just treat them the same?

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Grilled some "Chuck-Eye" steaks today (also known as the "poor-man's ribeye"). Mixed reviews. Parts of the cut were fantastic - almost Filet like. Other parts were tough - like Sirloin or worse. Would I buy them again? I'm not sure. Significant savings over Ribeyes but not nearly as good overall.

A chuckeye is basically a ribeye without the money muscle that goes around the steaks cut from the first five ribs on the cow. The Chuckeye comes from the 6th rib which means there are generally only 2 per cow (four if cut really thin, but then what's the point of having the steak?).

The last time I got them, they were $5.99/pound as opposed to $13.99 at that same grocery store. I'll take that all day long and seek them out to stow in the freezer. With the way beef prices are going to rocket up this year, get all the Chuckeyes you can...

Any tips on prepping a Chcukeye vs. a Ribeye? Or would you just treat them the same?

Exactly the same.

I did a post on Chuck Eyes. I talk about where they come from and how to prepare them.

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Grilled some "Chuck-Eye" steaks today (also known as the "poor-man's ribeye"). Mixed reviews. Parts of the cut were fantastic - almost Filet like. Other parts were tough - like Sirloin or worse. Would I buy them again? I'm not sure. Significant savings over Ribeyes but not nearly as good overall.

A chuckeye is basically a ribeye without the money muscle that goes around the steaks cut from the first five ribs on the cow. The Chuckeye comes from the 6th rib which means there are generally only 2 per cow (four if cut really thin, but then what's the point of having the steak?).

The last time I got them, they were $5.99/pound as opposed to $13.99 at that same grocery store. I'll take that all day long and seek them out to stow in the freezer. With the way beef prices are going to rocket up this year, get all the Chuckeyes you can...

Ribeye is like 6.99-8.99 at costco all the time around here and it's beautiful meat.

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Skinless boneless chicken breasts. I prefer skin on the chicken for the moisture, but the wife only likes skinless for the healthy reasons I guess. The exception is chicken wings.

I've had success with skinless/boneless breasts in that they were extremely moist on the inside.. I brine them and cutting through is like butter, however the outer hide is a bit dry for my liking. What are your suggestions for keeping the outside moist?

I like to smoke them at 270-275 until just at 165 internal temp. I brine then dust with Yard Bird rub.

I understand a bacon strip on top of the breast will do the "basting" trick, but the wife doesn't want the added calories. <_<

I could spritz some during the smoke but I'd rather not open the door (MES) if possible. Is there a good way to keep the outer layer moist during the smoke?

If I BBQ sauce them it's not an issue because I take them off and finish over high heat grill while adding sauce. But she doesn't always want them BBQ'd.

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If you're smoking I'm not sure you can avoid it because of the time involved getting the meat to cook using a low temperature method. I'd try experimenting with the shape. Pound em to an even thickness or cut them into more uniform-sized chunks. Higher surface area should cook the meat more quickly and give the exterior less time to dry out.

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Skinless boneless chicken breasts. I prefer skin on the chicken for the moisture, but the wife only likes skinless for the healthy reasons I guess. The exception is chicken wings.

I've had success with skinless/boneless breasts in that they were extremely moist on the inside.. I brine them and cutting through is like butter, however the outer hide is a bit dry for my liking. What are your suggestions for keeping the outside moist?

I like to smoke them at 270-275 until just at 165 internal temp. I brine then dust with Yard Bird rub.

I understand a bacon strip on top of the breast will do the "basting" trick, but the wife doesn't want the added calories. <_<

I could spritz some during the smoke but I'd rather not open the door (MES) if possible. Is there a good way to keep the outer layer moist during the smoke?

If I BBQ sauce them it's not an issue because I take them off and finish over high heat grill while adding sauce. But she doesn't always want them BBQ'd.

Ever try spritzing them while you cook? Beer, water, wine, apple cider, etc?

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IMO, you need to grill directly, or bake breasts. If I'm smoking chicken, it's either whole or thighs.

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You can use applesauce or low calorie mayo to lightly cover the them

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Skinless boneless chicken breasts. I prefer skin on the chicken for the moisture, but the wife only likes skinless for the healthy reasons I guess. The exception is chicken wings.

I've had success with skinless/boneless breasts in that they were extremely moist on the inside.. I brine them and cutting through is like butter, however the outer hide is a bit dry for my liking. What are your suggestions for keeping the outside moist?

I like to smoke them at 270-275 until just at 165 internal temp. I brine then dust with Yard Bird rub.

I understand a bacon strip on top of the breast will do the "basting" trick, but the wife doesn't want the added calories. <_<

I could spritz some during the smoke but I'd rather not open the door (MES) if possible. Is there a good way to keep the outer layer moist during the smoke?

If I BBQ sauce them it's not an issue because I take them off and finish over high heat grill while adding sauce. But she doesn't always want them BBQ'd.

Ever try spritzing them while you cook? Beer, water, wine, apple cider, etc?

Yes, but I was wondering about a method other than bacon on top where I wouldn't have to open the smoker door.

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You can use applesauce or low calorie mayo to lightly cover the them

Not sure I'd want apple sauce but lite mayo might be an option. Have you tried this? does it keep the meat moist? How does it affect taste, I wonder.

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You can use applesauce or low calorie mayo to lightly cover the them

Not sure I'd want apple sauce but lite mayo might be an option. Have you tried this? does it keep the meat moist? How does it affect taste, I wonder.

Much like a mustard slather mayo has zero affect on the taste of the chicken breast, they just act as a shield for the skin and if you want a crust you can add things like breadcrumbs, crushed crackers/goldfish, or just a lot of rub. Applesauce adds a bit of sweet and I often add hot sauce to it to give it a bit of kick as well.

Yes I have cooked BSCB using both and I often

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You can use applesauce or low calorie mayo to lightly cover the them

Not sure I'd want apple sauce but lite mayo might be an option. Have you tried this? does it keep the meat moist? How does it affect taste, I wonder.

Much like a mustard slather mayo has zero affect on the taste of the chicken breast, they just act as a shield for the skin and if you want a crust you can add things like breadcrumbs, crushed crackers/goldfish, or just a lot of rub. Applesauce adds a bit of sweet and I often add hot sauce to it to give it a bit of kick as well.

Yes I have cooked BSCB using both and I often

oh I'm going to try this. I like the lite mayo with olive oil. I'm going to do a few this weekend. Couple with bacon on top, one with mayo and one without anything but rub.

You just sprinkle your rub on top of the mayo then (like the mustard slather)? or is it just the mayo?

Thanks for the tip.

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You can use applesauce or low calorie mayo to lightly cover the them

Not sure I'd want apple sauce but lite mayo might be an option. Have you tried this? does it keep the meat moist? How does it affect taste, I wonder.

Much like a mustard slather mayo has zero affect on the taste of the chicken breast, they just act as a shield for the skin and if you want a crust you can add things like breadcrumbs, crushed crackers/goldfish, or just a lot of rub. Applesauce adds a bit of sweet and I often add hot sauce to it to give it a bit of kick as well.

Yes I have cooked BSCB using both and I often

oh I'm going to try this. I like the lite mayo with olive oil. I'm going to do a few this weekend. Couple with bacon on top, one with mayo and one without anything but rub.

You just sprinkle your rub on top of the mayo then (like the mustard slather)? or is it just the mayo?

Thanks for the tip.

Either way is fine, just make sure its a light coating. My prefered method is to salt/pepper the breast, then a light coating of mayo and then my rub.

With the bacon covered breast you are going to lose color if you start out the cook with the bacon on top, not sure if that matters or not to you, I usually cover with bacon about halfway through the cook, this mostly applies to skin on chicken but it does affect the color of BSCB as well.

Edited by Megla

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You can use applesauce or low calorie mayo to lightly cover the them

Not sure I'd want apple sauce but lite mayo might be an option. Have you tried this? does it keep the meat moist? How does it affect taste, I wonder.

Much like a mustard slather mayo has zero affect on the taste of the chicken breast, they just act as a shield for the skin and if you want a crust you can add things like breadcrumbs, crushed crackers/goldfish, or just a lot of rub. Applesauce adds a bit of sweet and I often add hot sauce to it to give it a bit of kick as well.

Yes I have cooked BSCB using both and I often

oh I'm going to try this. I like the lite mayo with olive oil. I'm going to do a few this weekend. Couple with bacon on top, one with mayo and one without anything but rub.

You just sprinkle your rub on top of the mayo then (like the mustard slather)? or is it just the mayo?

Thanks for the tip.

Either way is fine, just make sure its a light coating. My prefered method is to salt/pepper the breast, then a light coating of mayo and then my rub.

With the bacon covered breast you are going to lose color if you start out the cook with the bacon on top, not sure if that matters or not to you, I usually cover with bacon about halfway through the cook, this mostly applies to skin on chicken but it does affect the color of BSCB as well.

hmm.. hadn't heard that. I'm going to test around and see if I can come up with a method the wife and I like.

Would olive oil by itself work to keep moisture in like mayo? Just curious because I'm sure I'll have to mayo-coat the chicken out of wifey's sight.. she doesn't like mayo, even though she won't taste it she'll still poo poo the idea I'm sure. But I'll do it anyway.

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Mayo Magic Chicken

I'm going to be experimenting with mustard magic. Got a mustard company paying me to do some recipe development. Might try mustard coated BSCB with some panko on the outside.

I've got the smoker heating up to try this right now. The only change I made was I added a small amount of chipotle powder and added a little rub I got the last time I was in Missouri. The wife and I are really looking forward to seeing how it turns out.

Thanks for the recipe!

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My brother (who is a Kentucky alumni) said that he loved spicy honey barbecue wings, so I set out to try to make a creation to satisfy his craving wheelhouse for the Kentucky-Wisconsin Final Four game.

I ended up making something that I called Kentucky bourbon honey barbecue smoked hot wings. I brined the wings, rubbed them with my homemade barbecue rub, and put them directly on my smoker with hickory and apple wood chips. I lightly spritzed the wings when I turned them with a solution of apple juice, apple cider vinegar, and bourbon. I made a barbecue sauce with ketchup, apple cider vinegar, summer honey that I got from a farmer's market in Santa Fe, Maker's Mark bourbon, fresh-squeezed tangerine juice, Slap Ya Mama hot sauce, scotch bonnet pepper hot sauce, brown sugar, my barbecue rub, chipotle powder, black pepper, and fresh garlic. The sauce had a really nice balance of spicy, sweet, and smoky flavors. I basted the wings with the spicy bourbon honey barbecue sauce during the last 30 minutes of the cook, flipping once while basting. I thought the barbecue sauce really caramelized nicely on the outside of the wings with the honey and brown sugar in there. Here's a picture of what they looked like when they came off:

Kentucky bourbon honey barbecue smoked hot wings

My brother said that the wings were the most delicious thing that he had ever put in his mouth, although granted he really, really likes honey barbecue wings. But it always feels good to get some positive feedback.

Edited by Buckfast 1
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My brother (who is a Kentucky alumni) said that he loved spicy honey barbecue wings, so I set out to try to make a creation to satisfy his craving wheelhouse for the Kentucky-Wisconsin Final Four game.

I ended up making something that I called Kentucky bourbon honey barbecue smoked hot wings. I brined the wings, rubbed them with my homemade barbecue rub, and put them directly on my smoker with hickory and apple wood chips. I lightly spritzed the wings when I turned them with a solution of apple juice, apple cider vinegar, and bourbon. I made a barbecue sauce with ketchup, apple cider vinegar, summer honey that I got from a farmer's market in Santa Fe, Maker's Mark bourbon, fresh-squeezed tangerine juice, Slap Ya Mama hot sauce, scotch bonnet pepper hot sauce, brown sugar, my barbecue rub, chipotle powder, black pepper, and fresh garlic. The sauce had a really nice balance of spicy, sweet, and smoky flavors. I basted the wings with the spicy bourbon honey barbecue sauce during the last 30 minutes of the cook, flipping once while basting. Here's a picture of what they looked like when they came off:

Kentucky bourbon honey barbecue smoked hot wings

My brother said that the wings were the most delicious thing that he had ever put in his mouth, although granted he really, really likes honey barbecue wings. But it always feels good to get some positive feedback.

Wow - those look incredible and sound even better. Gonna do it if I ever get another smoker ...

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My brother (who is a Kentucky alumni) said that he loved spicy honey barbecue wings, so I set out to try to make a creation to satisfy his craving wheelhouse for the Kentucky-Wisconsin Final Four game.

I ended up making something that I called Kentucky bourbon honey barbecue smoked hot wings. I brined the wings, rubbed them with my homemade barbecue rub, and put them directly on my smoker with hickory and apple wood chips. I lightly spritzed the wings when I turned them with a solution of apple juice, apple cider vinegar, and bourbon. I made a barbecue sauce with ketchup, apple cider vinegar, summer honey that I got from a farmer's market in Santa Fe, Maker's Mark bourbon, fresh-squeezed tangerine juice, Slap Ya Mama hot sauce, scotch bonnet pepper hot sauce, brown sugar, my barbecue rub, chipotle powder, black pepper, and fresh garlic. The sauce had a really nice balance of spicy, sweet, and smoky flavors. I basted the wings with the spicy bourbon honey barbecue sauce during the last 30 minutes of the cook, flipping once while basting. Here's a picture of what they looked like when they came off:

Kentucky bourbon honey barbecue smoked hot wings

My brother said that the wings were the most delicious thing that he had ever put in his mouth, although granted he really, really likes honey barbecue wings. But it always feels good to get some positive feedback.

Those look awesome!!

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Anyone know anything about Broil King grills? Deciding between their Signet 20 and a Weber Spirit E-210 and wondering if anyone had used the BK before. Great but limited reviews online. Naturally, the Weber gets fantastic reviews as well, but the Broil King gives you a lot more cooking area for the $.

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Mayo Magic Chicken

I'm going to be experimenting with mustard magic. Got a mustard company paying me to do some recipe development. Might try mustard coated BSCB with some panko on the outside.

I've got the smoker heating up to try this right now. The only change I made was I added a small amount of chipotle powder and added a little rub I got the last time I was in Missouri. The wife and I are really looking forward to seeing how it turns out.

Thanks for the recipe!

So these turned out pretty good Sunday! They were just a tad dry, but I'm pretty sure that had to do with the weather not letting my WSM get over 245* so they cooked longer, allowing them to dry out just a little.

This is definitely one of those things I'm going try again and add more spice to the slather. I had a couple of sandwiches with the leftovers last night and they were great, too!

I can see making a bunch of these when the price of the BSCB are on sale, freezing and food savering them. Great quick dinner during the week.

Thanks again Fanatic!

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You can use applesauce or low calorie mayo to lightly cover the them

Not sure I'd want apple sauce but lite mayo might be an option. Have you tried this? does it keep the meat moist? How does it affect taste, I wonder.

Much like a mustard slather mayo has zero affect on the taste of the chicken breast, they just act as a shield for the skin and if you want a crust you can add things like breadcrumbs, crushed crackers/goldfish, or just a lot of rub. Applesauce adds a bit of sweet and I often add hot sauce to it to give it a bit of kick as well.

Yes I have cooked BSCB using both and I often

oh I'm going to try this. I like the lite mayo with olive oil. I'm going to do a few this weekend. Couple with bacon on top, one with mayo and one without anything but rub.

You just sprinkle your rub on top of the mayo then (like the mustard slather)? or is it just the mayo?

Thanks for the tip.

Either way is fine, just make sure its a light coating. My prefered method is to salt/pepper the breast, then a light coating of mayo and then my rub.

With the bacon covered breast you are going to lose color if you start out the cook with the bacon on top, not sure if that matters or not to you, I usually cover with bacon about halfway through the cook, this mostly applies to skin on chicken but it does affect the color of BSCB as well.

Did these this weekend. Chicken was excellent, very juicy. Smoked 6 skinless breasts and two leg quarters (skin on) with cherry wood at 270F. Brined for almost two hours.

Three breasts used the mayo. Meh, not too excited about the mayo. Didn't notice any flavor added, but breast was moist. Seemed unnecessary and the wife doesn't care for any of the extra calories.

One breast with just rub. Tender and juicy inside but outside not as tender.

Two breasts with olive oil then rub. Bingo. Tender and juicy on the inside and on the outside. Seems the olive oil under the rub helps seal in the moisture and keeps the outside moist as well. Plus it helps the chicken to not stick to the grate.

Leg quarters just smoked then finished on grill to char a little sauce on them. I don't think brining is necessary for leg quarters or wings (with skin on), but I will certainly brine breasts, especially skinless.

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Two questions

Anyone know how to get a good infusion of garlic into a steak (think Texas de Brazil)

Also what's your signature company-is-coming-over grill dish?

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So, I'm smoking a 12.5-pound brisket this weekend, which will be first time I've done brisket since my first smoke ever several years ago. Does anyone have any good brisket smoking tips?

How much of the fat cap do you trim?

Do you inject and, if so, what do you use?

What type of wood do you like to use for brisket?

Do you foil at all during the cook?

Approximately how long do you estimate the cook will take per pound?

Thanks for any advice! I'm looking forward to trying to master brisket.

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Two questions

Anyone know how to get a good infusion of garlic into a steak (think Texas de Brazil)

Also what's your signature company-is-coming-over grill dish?

I like to do a stuffed pork loin. All the prep work can be done before they come over, but it doesn't take much work on the grill (ie more socializing).

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So, I'm smoking a 12.5-pound brisket this weekend, which will be first time I've done brisket since my first smoke ever several years ago. Does anyone have any good brisket smoking tips?

How much of the fat cap do you trim? As much as possible

Do you inject and, if so, what do you use? I do not inject

What type of wood do you like to use for brisket? I like hickory, but have used mesquite before

Do you foil at all during the cook? Yes. Cook until it reaches 165, then foil and keep cooking until it reaches 195

Approximately how long do you estimate the cook will take per pound? Can't remember off the top of my head. I wanna say 1.5 hours per pound. You have a HUGE brisket, so it's gonna take a while.

Thanks for any advice! I'm looking forward to trying to master brisket.

Answers above in red.

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Also, you can always get it done earlier than needed and simply wrap in foil, then wrap in towels and place it in a cooler. Will last for hours this way.

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Pulling a salmon filet out of the cure tonight. Planning to cold-smoke on Saturday.

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So, I'm smoking a 12.5-pound brisket this weekend, which will be first time I've done brisket since my first smoke ever several years ago. Does anyone have any good brisket smoking tips?

How much of the fat cap do you trim?

Do you inject and, if so, what do you use?

What type of wood do you like to use for brisket?

Do you foil at all during the cook?

Approximately how long do you estimate the cook will take per pound?

Thanks for any advice! I'm looking forward to trying to master brisket.

I leave at least 1/4 inch of fat cap

Try a Dr Pepper (3 cans) teriyaki (1/2 cup) and Worshtisher (1/2 cup) marinade and let sit for at least 24 hours

Drain off and add 1 cup of pomegranate and bring to a boil. simmer for 45 minutes and use as either an injection or a spritzer

I season with salt and heavy coating of fresh ground black pepper and then spice with Montreal Steak blend

Don't forget to cut one of the tips away across the grain of the meast so that you know what way to slice once you cook is done, nothing will riun a good brisket like cutting your slices with the grain

Any of the harder woods will work, hickery, mosquite, alder, oak, maple, I prefer oak

Yes as mentioned before pull at 165 and foil, approximately 1.5 hours per pound at 225-250

Foil at 165 to 190, pull and double foil and let rest for at least 1 hour

Edited by Megla

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Anyone know anything about Broil King grills? Deciding between their Signet 20 and a Weber Spirit E-210 and wondering if anyone had used the BK before. Great but limited reviews online. Naturally, the Weber gets fantastic reviews as well, but the Broil King gives you a lot more cooking area for the $.

I just bought a Spirit E310 in February. Love this thing so far. Cooks everything very evenly and seems like it doesn't take long for the grill to get hot. Would definitely recommend it.

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Anyone know anything about Broil King grills? Deciding between their Signet 20 and a Weber Spirit E-210 and wondering if anyone had used the BK before. Great but limited reviews online. Naturally, the Weber gets fantastic reviews as well, but the Broil King gives you a lot more cooking area for the $.

I just bought a Spirit E310 in February. Love this thing so far. Cooks everything very evenly and seems like it doesn't take long for the grill to get hot. Would definitely recommend it.

Got my Spirit assembled yesterday. Getting propane tank and doing the leak test tonight, first cook will be steaks tomorrow night.

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Anyone know anything about Broil King grills? Deciding between their Signet 20 and a Weber Spirit E-210 and wondering if anyone had used the BK before. Great but limited reviews online. Naturally, the Weber gets fantastic reviews as well, but the Broil King gives you a lot more cooking area for the $.

I just bought a Spirit E310 in February. Love this thing so far. Cooks everything very evenly and seems like it doesn't take long for the grill to get hot. Would definitely recommend it.

Got my Spirit assembled yesterday. Getting propane tank and doing the leak test tonight, first cook will be steaks tomorrow night.

I had mine assembled at Lowe's lol. I know, I know, lazy, but hey it was free. My favorite thing is the propane gauge to tell me if I need propane or not. Nothing worse than starting to grill and running out of gas halfway through. Won't have that problem anymore.

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Anyone know anything about Broil King grills? Deciding between their Signet 20 and a Weber Spirit E-210 and wondering if anyone had used the BK before. Great but limited reviews online. Naturally, the Weber gets fantastic reviews as well, but the Broil King gives you a lot more cooking area for the $.

I just bought a Spirit E310 in February. Love this thing so far. Cooks everything very evenly and seems like it doesn't take long for the grill to get hot. Would definitely recommend it.

Got my Spirit assembled yesterday. Getting propane tank and doing the leak test tonight, first cook will be steaks tomorrow night.

I had mine assembled at Lowe's lol. I know, I know, lazy, but hey it was free. My favorite thing is the propane gauge to tell me if I need propane or not. Nothing worse than starting to grill and running out of gas halfway through. Won't have that problem anymore.

Innovative

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Anyone know anything about Broil King grills? Deciding between their Signet 20 and a Weber Spirit E-210 and wondering if anyone had used the BK before. Great but limited reviews online. Naturally, the Weber gets fantastic reviews as well, but the Broil King gives you a lot more cooking area for the $.

I just bought a Spirit E310 in February. Love this thing so far. Cooks everything very evenly and seems like it doesn't take long for the grill to get hot. Would definitely recommend it.

Got my Spirit assembled yesterday. Getting propane tank and doing the leak test tonight, first cook will be steaks tomorrow night.

I had mine assembled at Lowe's lol. I know, I know, lazy, but hey it was free. My favorite thing is the propane gauge to tell me if I need propane or not. Nothing worse than starting to grill and running out of gas halfway through. Won't have that problem anymore.

Innovative

Lol never Weber came up with it, but it's definitely a cool thing to have.

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I'm really pleased with how my beef brisket turned out today.

I ended up using the Fanatic's technique of slathering the brisket with mustard (I used Sierra Nevada's Stout and Stoneground mustard), except that I added a little apple cider, apple cider vinegar, and some of my rub to the mustard. I left the brisket in the mustard rub for about 24 hours.

I got home from the bar last night around 2:45 AM, but decided to just go ahead and get my brisket started instead of risking not waking up early enough if I went straight to bed drunk. I thoroughly cleaned the mustard rub off of the brisket and applied a rub that I made using Spanish paprika, chipotle chile powder, black pepper, crushed Aleppo chiles, kosher salt, brown sugar, honey powder, granulated onion, and granulated garlic.

I smoked the brisket on my WSM using hickory, mesquite, pecan, and cherry wood chunks. I ended up lightly injecting the brisket with beef broth with a little bit of apple cider vinegar and rub mid-way through the cook.

My smoker temps hung around between 250 and 275 degrees for most of the day. After about 10 hours, the brisket had hit an internal temp of around 190 degrees, so I pulled it at that time. I let it rest for about 30 minutes and then sliced. The brisket was really tender and pulled apart easily. I was really happy about how the flavors came together.

Here is a pic of the final product:

http://imgur.com/ZrO4REA

Edited by Buckfast 1

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I think I'm going to smoke a ham for Easter this year and see how that turns out. I'm going to buy (or attempt to) a spiral cut ham which is already cured and I'm going to glaze it with a mixture of butter, brown sugar, maple syrup and honey every 30 minutes. This is my first attempt at this and what I cant seem to figure is whats a good I.T. to pull the ham, any idea? I'm thinking 150'ish, thoughts?

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I think I'm going to smoke a ham for Easter this year and see how that turns out. I'm going to buy (or attempt to) a spiral cut ham which is already cured and I'm going to glaze it with a mixture of butter, brown sugar, maple syrup and honey every 30 minutes. This is my first attempt at this and what I cant seem to figure is whats a good I.T. to pull the ham, any idea? I'm thinking 150'ish, thoughts?

I did this a while back. As far as I can remember, I did exactly what you are talking about, and it came out great. I used hickory. Way better than just an oven warm up. I think I set it in a foil boat with some pineapple juice in it, but that's probably not really necessary.

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Has anyone smoked a potato? Planning to smoke a beer can chicken today, and thought about smoking some baking potatoes, as well.

Most of what I've found says to cut slits in the skin, rub with olive oil and rub, then just throw them in the smoker for 1.5 - 2 hours. Seems simple enough, but wanted to see if anyone here had any experience/tips.

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Smokin-It electric smoker is en route to my house. I hope this thing is as good as the online reviews say it is.

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Has anyone smoked a potato? Planning to smoke a beer can chicken today, and thought about smoking some baking potatoes, as well.

Most of what I've found says to cut slits in the skin, rub with olive oil and rub, then just throw them in the smoker for 1.5 - 2 hours. Seems simple enough, but wanted to see if anyone here had any experience/tips.

That seems awfully long. I make baked potatoes on my kettle all the time, setting them up for indirect heat. I only leave them on for 45-60 minutes.

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I did a cold-smoked salmon filet a couple of weeks ago. Put part of it in a FoodSaver (vac) bag and tossed it in the deep freeze.

Noticed over the weekend that it didn't freeze "solid" - it's still pliable. I can only assume that there's so much salt and so little water in the fish that it can't form ice crystals.

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Has anyone smoked a potato? Planning to smoke a beer can chicken today, and thought about smoking some baking potatoes, as well.

Most of what I've found says to cut slits in the skin, rub with olive oil and rub, then just throw them in the smoker for 1.5 - 2 hours. Seems simple enough, but wanted to see if anyone here had any experience/tips.

That seems awfully long. I make baked potatoes on my kettle all the time, setting them up for indirect heat. I only leave them on for 45-60 minutes.

Turned out that 2 hours at 250-275 was just about right. I poked holes in them, rubbed them down with olive oil, then sprinkled them with salt, pepper, and garlic powder.

Tasted like a slightly crunchier baked potato. Pretty good!

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