Fantasy Football - Footballguys Forums
whoknew

The Russia Investigation: Special Counsel Says Certain Parts of Buzzfeed Report are not Accurate

Recommended Posts

37 minutes ago, cosjobs said:

Everyday there is more. 

Paradise Papers: Leaks Show Wilbur Ross Hid Ties to Putin Cronies
by RICHARD ENGEL and AGGELOS PETROPOULOS

Wilbur Ross, the commerce secretary in the Trump administration, shares business interests with Vladimir Putin’s immediate family, and he failed to clearly disclose those interests when he was being confirmed for his cabinet position.

Ross — a billionaire industrialist — retains an interest in a shipping company, Navigator Holdings, that was partially owned by his former investment company. One of Navigator’s most important business relationships is with a Russian energy firm controlled, in turn, by Putin’s son-in-law and other members of the Russian president’s inner circle.

Some of the details of Ross’s continuing financial holdings — much of which were not disclosed during his confirmation process — are revealed in a trove of more than 7 million internal documents of Appleby, a Bermuda-based law firm, that was leaked to the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung. 

Just a coincidence that this story broke right after Trump was wheels up for 10ish days in Asia with Ross on the plane.

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, cosjobs said:

Its weird. When the indictments started coming out, I expected   return to normalcy, but instead they're being use as a springboard for the moderate right to dive headlong into treasonous morass.

Death throes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, adonis said:

Can we just say, up front, that it'll be a BFD if the former National Security Advisor that Trump appointed gets indicted? 

Can we say that it's a BBFD that his National Security Advisor AND his former campaign chairman will have been indicted?

There is almost no precedent in american history for this kind of stuff, and too many of you are posting piddly stuff about "Clinton this" and "Clinton that" while our democracy is being purged of foreign agents put there, in large part, by Donald J. Trump.

I think Flynn was only NSA for a very brief time and was actually hired by Obama.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Ignoramus said:

I think Flynn was only NSA for a very brief time and was actually hired by Obama.

Maybe I'm misunderstanding what you are saying, but he was Trump's National Security Advisor - yes, for a short time.

 

Edit - Not sure if Obama ever "hired" him, but didn't Obama essentially "fire" him, albeit from a different role?

Edited by Koya

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Koya said:

Maybe I'm misunderstanding what you are saying, but he was Trump's National Security Advisor - yes, for a short time.

 

Edit - Not sure if Obama ever "hired" him, but didn't Obama essentially "fire" him, albeit from a different role?

Don't forget Obama kept his security clearance

And you need to check your sarcasm meter. It seems to be on the fritz

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Ignoramus said:

I think Flynn was only NSA for a very brief time and was actually hired by Obama.

Are you playing the game ofguess the pitiful excuse by the Trump admin when Flynn goes down?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, msommer said:

Don't forget Obama kept his security clearance

And you need to check your sarcasm meter. It seems to be on the fritz

Maybe your sarcasm maker ain't quite cooking them through, gb. :shrug: 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, cosjobs said:

FreestylerMom ??‏ @HighPlainsGirl1

Replying to @HighPlainsGirl1 @counterchekist

None of these revelations seem to matter to people. This is exactly what Russia was aiming for I think. For us to become numb to all of it.

Close- but I think they were aiming for stupid people to buy into stupid illogical premises - and it's worked - because those people are stupid

 

HEY IGNORE ALL THOSE FACTS THINGIES - HILLARY SOLD URANIUM 
TO BEEZLEBUB HIMSELF - LOCK HER UP

Edited by John Bender
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, John Bender said:

Close- but I think they were aiming for stupid people to buy into stupid illogical premises - and it's worked - because those people are stupid

 

HEY IGNORE ALL THOSE FACTS THINGIES - HILLARY SOLD URANIUM 
TO BEEZLEBUB HIMSELF - LOCK HER UP

That's a new one. Hillary sold Uranium to Trump?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When all the dust settles, I bet we'll find out that's not a coincidence that all these people with Russian ties ended up in the Trump administration. If I had to guess, we'll find out that the administration was given a list of Russian friendly politicians and businessmen that could be trusted to be put into the administration.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wouldn't that be strange if Trump asks Putin for political asylum as he abandons the American people, his family, and whomever else as he lives out his days in Russia before being poisoned by Putin.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Mario Kart said:

Wouldn't that be strange if Trump asks Putin for political asylum as he abandons the American people, his family, and whomever else as he lives out his days in Russia before being poisoned by Putin.

Don't tease me.

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rick Wilson‏Verified account @TheRickWilson

FollowingFollowing @TheRickWilson

More

I expect the same folks who credulously took the GRU's Wikileaks as gospel will deny the Paradise Papers vehemently: it hits Trump allies.

3:16 PM - 5 Nov 2017

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Koya said:

Maybe I'm misunderstanding what you are saying, but he was Trump's National Security Advisor - yes, for a short time.

 

Edit - Not sure if Obama ever "hired" him, but didn't Obama essentially "fire" him, albeit from a different role?

 

2 hours ago, Koya said:

Maybe I'm misunderstanding what you are saying, but he was Trump's National Security Advisor - yes, for a short time.

 

Edit - Not sure if Obama ever "hired" him, but didn't Obama essentially "fire" him, albeit from a different role?

Yeah, that "Obama" line had been floated earlier. "Extreme vetting" and "Party of Accountability" and all that.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Ignoramus said:

 

Yeah, that "Obama" line had been floated earlier. "Extreme vetting" and "Party of Accountability" and all that.

The Buck stops anywhere not red or rhyming with nobama or shillary

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

oh Louise

Exclusive: Sources: General Flynn ‘Wept’ As He Asked FBI to Spare Mike Flynn Jr
Exclusive: Retired Lt. Gen. Flynn broke down and sobbed, sources familiar with the matter said, when faced with the extent of the signals intelligence, or SIGINT, against himself and Mike Flynn Jr. Senior law enforcement officials presented Donald Trump’s former National Security adviser, already indicted at the time for failure to register as a foreign agent of Turkey, with irrefutable evidence of espionage committed on behalf of the Russian state by both himself and his son and business partner, Mike Flynn Jr. Espionage is a capital crime.

Separate sources with links to the intelligence community and the Justice Department report that a deal for leniency for his son offered to General Flynn, on which we exclusively reported earlier this year, may have been derailed by Mike Flynn Jr’s compulsive tweeting of divisive, pro-Kremlin propaganda.

As NBC news reports that Mueller is about to bring charges against both Mike Flynn and his son, we review our exclusive reporting on both Flynn and his son and the indictments that may be unsealed shortly.

In May, we broke the news that General Flynn had ‘flipped’, or had gone in to speak to the FBI. At that time, Mike Flynn was under indictment for failing to register as a foreign agent for Turkey under FARA, the Foreign Agents’ Registration Act.

General Flynn, sources reported, was arrogant and unconcerned. The charge of failing to register under FARA might only result in a term-limited prison sentence. Flynn had resigned as NSA and believed himself present in the FBI’s offices to discuss the terms of a deal on this charge.

Sources said that General Flynn did indeed discuss this offense, which was admitted, with FBI agents. However, they reported that after a brief period, a senior official entered the room and confronted General Flynn with knowledge of his wider conspiracy in Russia’s interference in the election. An outline of a case for espionage, a capital crime, where the default penalty is death, was made to Flynn senior, involving both himself and his son Mike Flynn Jr. While sources were not specific, they reported that the conversation involved both men’s knowing propagation, and co-ordination, with the Kremlin, of Russian propaganda, using an Artificial Intelligence ‘data weapon’ precisely to target that propaganda on social media. This technology and the way it was employed is also said to feature in an espionage investigation that is ongoing against Bob Mercer, sources say.

Sources stated that senior officials told General Flynn that they had what they needed to prosecute him and his son, and that they would seek the death penalty. Separate sources reported that General Flynn broke down and wept, asking that the death penalty for espionage not be sought for his son.

Sources with links to law enforcement and the justice department stated that at first, senior officials declined to offer a deal of any sort. Later, they became amenable, these sources said. General Flynn was offered a stark choice; co-operate and spare your son execution, but no such promise was made as regards his own trial.

Mr. Flynn did then co-operate, sources said.

Mike Flynn Jr. angrily denied to this reporter the accounts given her by multiple separate sources, on separate occasions, of what his father had done for him, and in such a way that led her to believe that Flynn Jr. did not know. If correct, this would necessarily mean that the FBI had not allowed General Flynn to discuss his knowledge of the charges against father and son with his co-conspirator.

Despite this, General Flynn was required to put a brake on Mike Flynn Jr.’s divisive propaganda on Twitter, sources said. The younger Flynn was, however, so addicted to tweeting hate-ridden Russian messaging, these sources said, that the Special Counsel’s office decided at one point that the deal had been violated. It was after Flynn Sr. was informed of that decision that he began to fund-raise for his defense, sources said.

Anything General Flynn would have admitted prior to this would still be admissible at trial, sources reported. At time of writing, I do not know whether or not the Special Counsel’s team had a change of heart over honoring their deal for leniency for the younger Flynn following further information received from Mike Flynn Senior.

Note: New charges do not necessarily mean new indictments, but they can.

A ‘charge’ is only leveled when an indictment is made public. Therefore, charges may be new for indictments that have been returned by a Grand Jury many months prior. Mr. Mueller may choose to indict General Flynn on some, but not all, of the possible charges against him, as he did with Paul Manafort.

eta Louise Mensch

Edited by cosjobs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Biff84 said:

When all the dust settles, I bet we'll find out that's not a coincidence that all these people with Russian ties ended up in the Trump administration. If I had to guess, we'll find out that the administration was given a list of Russian friendly politicians and businessmen that could be trusted to be put into the administration.

That's the thing though, it wasn't like Tillerson, Ross, Flynn, or Sessions weren't open secrets, but it didn't matter.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, cosjobs said:

oh Louise

Exclusive: Sources: General Flynn ‘Wept’ As He Asked FBI to Spare Mike Flynn Jr
Exclusive: Retired Lt. Gen. Flynn broke down and sobbed, sources familiar with the matter said, when faced with the extent of the signals intelligence, or SIGINT, against himself and Mike Flynn Jr. Senior law enforcement officials presented Donald Trump’s former National Security adviser, already indicted at the time for failure to register as a foreign agent of Turkey, with irrefutable evidence of espionage committed on behalf of the Russian state by both himself and his son and business partner, Mike Flynn Jr. Espionage is a capital crime.

Separate sources with links to the intelligence community and the Justice Department report that a deal for leniency for his son offered to General Flynn, on which we exclusively reported earlier this year, may have been derailed by Mike Flynn Jr’s compulsive tweeting of divisive, pro-Kremlin propaganda.

I completely missed the first words in bold when I started reading this, but as soon as I read the second part in bold, I stopped and thought, “Oh, this must be from Louise Mensch. Why am I reading this nonsense?”

The warning should be more obvious, GB.

(No, I didn’t recognize it from the exclusive earlier reporting. I recognized it because nobody else engages in that kind of self-promotional back-patting before being confirmed by a reliable publication.)

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Maurile Tremblay said:

I completely missed the first words in bold when I started reading this, but as soon as I read the second part in bold, I stopped and thought, “Oh, this must be from Louise Mensch. Why am I reading this nonsense?”

The warning should be more obvious, GB.

I added the full name at the end, just because of that.

But seriously GB, what do you think her batting average is. Admittedly, she's crazy and a lot of TBDs on the horizon, but I think her BA is not too far behind the Steele dossier (of what we know, or think we do).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, cosjobs said:

I added the full name at the end, just because of that.

But seriously GB, what do you think her batting average is. Admittedly, she's crazy and a lot of TBDs on the horizon, but I think her BA is not too far behind the Steele dossier (of what we know, or think we do).

I wasn’t going to make it to the end.

I think her batting average is pretty close to that of Nostradamus: roughly near zero on “exclusive” takes that aren’t over-interpreted using hindsight to retrofit vague predictions to events after the fact.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Sammy3469 said:

Now Russia has billion dollar stakes in Twitter and Facebook through a Kushner associate

https://www.theguardian.com/news/2017/nov/05/russia-funded-facebook-twitter-investments-kushner-associate

This is capitalism eating democracy.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, Maurile Tremblay said:

I think her batting average is pretty close to that of Nostradamus: roughly near zero on “exclusive” takes that aren’t over-interpreted using hindsight to retrofit vague predictions to events after the fact.

I hadn’t read anything by her in a long time, so I checked Wikipedia to see if it had a link to anyone trying to objectively keep track of her batting average. I didn’t find that, but it does have a section describing her reporting on events related to the 2016 election. The thing I often see her given credit for getting right is the FISA warrants on Trump Tower. I remember looking at the details of the claim back when she was touting it as a scoop ultimately proven correct and concluding that she didn’t actually get very much right about it. The Wikipedia entry lists some of the discrepancies between her reporting and what was confirmed elsewhere ... and then lists a litany of other claims she’s made that have not been confirmed and seem like complete nonsense.

ETA: For fun, here is that latter section:

Quote

During and after the 2016 US presidential election, Mensch's political commentary has promoted conspiracy theories about the Russian government, Donald Trump and people in Trump's circle. Mensch claims she has evidence that Vladimir Putin had Andrew Breitbart murdered to make room for Steve Bannon at Breitbart. She has stated that the 2017 Istanbul nightclub shooting was a Russian false flag operation, with Russia posing as ISIL; that "Bannon and his team" were behind bomb threats to Jewish community centres; and that Russian intelligence planted Hillary Clinton's emails on Anthony Weiner's laptop. Mensch has also accused numerous people and organizations of being Russian "shills", "moles" and "agents of influence," including founder of Facebook Mark Zuckerberg, Peter Thiel, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and elements of Mossad (Israel's intelligence service).

Maybe she’s gotten some stuff right, too. But I can’t think of anything (though I admittedly haven’t been paying attention since way back in the beginning) and Wikipedia doesn’t mention anything either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bucky86 said:

I hope we wake up to nice Flynn and Flynn Jr. perp walk tomorrow morning.

Today's news was laying the groundwork for indictments down the line.  I'd seriously doubt indictments are unsealed tomorrow.  Unlike Manafort, besides for the FARA stuff, the more robust case against Flynn is much more nuanced as there probably aren't as many direct documents.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Sammy3469 said:

Today's news was laying the groundwork for indictments down the line.  I'd seriously doubt indictments are unsealed tomorrow.  Unlike Manafort, besides for the FARA stuff, the more robust case against Flynn is much more nuanced as there probably aren't as many direct documents.

I speculate they have everything they need and more. They may wait to play their cards, but I'm fairly certain they have the cards to play

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Maurile Tremblay said:

I hadn’t read anything by her in a long time, so I checked Wikipedia to see if it had a link to anyone trying to objectively keep track of her batting average. I didn’t find that, but it does have a section describing her reporting on events related to the 2016 election. The thing I often see her given credit for getting right is the FISA warrants on Trump Tower. I remember looking at the details of the claim back when she was touting it as a scoop ultimately proven correct and concluding that she didn’t actually get very much right about it. The Wikipedia entry lists some of the discrepancies between her reporting and what was confirmed elsewhere ... and then lists a litany of other claims she’s made that have not been confirmed and seem like complete nonsense.

ETA: For fun, here is that latter section:

Maybe she’s gotten some stuff right, too. But I can’t think of anything (though I admittedly haven’t been paying attention since way back in the beginning) and Wikipedia doesn’t mention anything either.

She has reported parts of a lot of things that have come true. I think that she has legit sources but her problem is that she takes raw data, expands on it and puts into a narrative that makes for a better 'story'. 

For the story above, I wouldn't be surprised if parts of it are true like Flynn breaking down crying and being willing to cooperate to save his son. But then she has to add in the death penalty stuff and just goes off the rails. I can't read her twitter feed anymore because it's all twitter drama and accusing people of being Russian operatives.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trump said he envisions easing trade restrictions in another way, outside the TPP framework, but offered few details beyond saying that he personally had the power to speed business deals that had been hung up in the past.

He cited the Keystone and Dakota pipelines that he been held up under the Obama administration. "In my first week, I approved both," Trump said.Bloomberg

...we already know quite a bit about Trump’s connections to the fossil fuel industry and to the Dakota Access Pipeline. link

Trump has deep financial and personnel ties to the pipeline, which would transport nearly 500,000 barrels of fracked oil per day from North Dakota to Illinois. The pipeline threatens the water supply and sacred lands of the Standing Rock Sioux, who have joined with dozens of tribes and other groups to stop the project.

While much of Trump’s finances remain a mystery, he did have to file a financial disclosure form when he declared his candidacy for president (despite his claims, this is not the same and does not provide the same level of transparency as a tax return). This disclosure form shows significant investments in the fossil fuel industry, and two of the fossil fuel companies Trump holds stock in are directly funding the Dakota Access Pipeline.

This year, Trump disclosed between $1,500 and $50,000 in investments in the primary builder of the pipeline, Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners. This figure is down from the $500,000 to $1 million in investments he disclosed in 2015. 

He also disclosed between $100,000 and $250,000  in investments in Phillips 66, which would own one-quarter of the Dakota Access Pipeline once completed.

Trump’s other (disclosed) fossil fuel investments include:

Chevron: $550,000 to $1,100,000
Occidental Petroleum: $500,001 to $1 million
Total: $501,000 to $1,015,000
BHP Billiton: $501,000 to $1,015,00
ExxonMobil: $50,000 to $100,000
Halliburton: $51,000 to $115,000
EOG Resources: $50,000 to $100,000
Schlumberger: $15,000 to $50,000
Conoco Phillips: $1,000 to $15,000
Shell: $1,000 to $15,000
Kinder Morgan: $2,000 to $30,000
But Trump’s ties to fossil fuels and infrastructure projects like the Dakota Access Pipeline don’t stop at his financial investments. They run deep through the team advising him on energy policy, including top adviser and oil billionaire Harold Hamm.

:

 

 

seems conflicty

Edited by cosjobs
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, cosjobs said:

Trump said he envisions easing trade restrictions in another way, outside the TPP framework, but offered few details beyond saying that he personally had the power to speed business deals that had been hung up in the past.

He cited the Keystone and Dakota pipelines that he been held up under the Obama administration. "In my first week, I approved both," Trump said.Bloomberg

...we already know quite a bit about Trump’s connections to the fossil fuel industry and to the Dakota Access Pipeline. link

Trump has deep financial and personnel ties to the pipeline, which would transport nearly 500,000 barrels of fracked oil per day from North Dakota to Illinois. The pipeline threatens the water supply and sacred lands of the Standing Rock Sioux, who have joined with dozens of tribes and other groups to stop the project.

While much of Trump’s finances remain a mystery, he did have to file a financial disclosure form when he declared his candidacy for president (despite his claims, this is not the same and does not provide the same level of transparency as a tax return). This disclosure form shows significant investments in the fossil fuel industry, and two of the fossil fuel companies Trump holds stock in are directly funding the Dakota Access Pipeline.

This year, Trump disclosed between $1,500 and $50,000 in investments in the primary builder of the pipeline, Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners. This figure is down from the $500,000 to $1 million in investments he disclosed in 2015. 

He also disclosed between $100,000 and $250,000  in investments in Phillips 66, which would own one-quarter of the Dakota Access Pipeline once completed.

Trump’s other (disclosed) fossil fuel investments include:

Chevron: $550,000 to $1,100,000
Occidental Petroleum: $500,001 to $1 million
Total: $501,000 to $1,015,000
BHP Billiton: $501,000 to $1,015,00
ExxonMobil: $50,000 to $100,000
Halliburton: $51,000 to $115,000
EOG Resources: $50,000 to $100,000
Schlumberger: $15,000 to $50,000
Conoco Phillips: $1,000 to $15,000
Shell: $1,000 to $15,000
Kinder Morgan: $2,000 to $30,000
But Trump’s ties to fossil fuels and infrastructure projects like the Dakota Access Pipeline don’t stop at his financial investments. They run deep through the team advising him on energy policy, including top adviser and oil billionaire Harold Hamm.

:

 

 

seems conflicty

"The law's totally on my side, the president can't have a conflict of interest,”

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Slapdash said:

"The law's totally on my side, the president can't have a conflict of interest,”

:slapsforehead:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, cosjobs said:

Trump said he envisions easing trade restrictions in another way, outside the TPP framework, but offered few details beyond saying that he personally had the power to speed business deals that had been hung up in the past.

He cited the Keystone and Dakota pipelines that he been held up under the Obama administration. "In my first week, I approved both," Trump said.Bloomberg

...we already know quite a bit about Trump’s connections to the fossil fuel industry and to the Dakota Access Pipeline. link

Trump has deep financial and personnel ties to the pipeline, which would transport nearly 500,000 barrels of fracked oil per day from North Dakota to Illinois. The pipeline threatens the water supply and sacred lands of the Standing Rock Sioux, who have joined with dozens of tribes and other groups to stop the project.

While much of Trump’s finances remain a mystery, he did have to file a financial disclosure form when he declared his candidacy for president (despite his claims, this is not the same and does not provide the same level of transparency as a tax return). This disclosure form shows significant investments in the fossil fuel industry, and two of the fossil fuel companies Trump holds stock in are directly funding the Dakota Access Pipeline.

This year, Trump disclosed between $1,500 and $50,000 in investments in the primary builder of the pipeline, Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners. This figure is down from the $500,000 to $1 million in investments he disclosed in 2015. 

He also disclosed between $100,000 and $250,000  in investments in Phillips 66, which would own one-quarter of the Dakota Access Pipeline once completed.

Trump’s other (disclosed) fossil fuel investments include:

Chevron: $550,000 to $1,100,000
Occidental Petroleum: $500,001 to $1 million
Total: $501,000 to $1,015,000
BHP Billiton: $501,000 to $1,015,00
ExxonMobil: $50,000 to $100,000
Halliburton: $51,000 to $115,000
EOG Resources: $50,000 to $100,000
Schlumberger: $15,000 to $50,000
Conoco Phillips: $1,000 to $15,000
Shell: $1,000 to $15,000
Kinder Morgan: $2,000 to $30,000
But Trump’s ties to fossil fuels and infrastructure projects like the Dakota Access Pipeline don’t stop at his financial investments. They run deep through the team advising him on energy policy, including top adviser and oil billionaire Harold Hamm.

:

 

 

seems conflicty

 

ETA

Hamm is Trump’s energy adviser, campaign surrogate, and the CEO of the largest fracking company in the country, Continental Resources. Hamm, who maxed out contributions to Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, also contributed hundreds of thousands of dollars to the Republican National Committee’s efforts to elect Trump. He’s made billions of dollars drilling and fracking for oil in North Dakota, and it would be Continental’s oil that would flow through the Dakota Access Pipeline if completed.

Hamm recently announced to investors that oil fracked from his North Dakota holdings would be transported by the pipeline, and he anticipates huge profits for himself when the project is completed.

Finally, Energy Transfer Partners CEO Kelcy Warren donated $100,300 to Trump’s presidential campaign directly and $66,800 to the Republican National Committee after became the nominee.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, NickyHatton said:

That article requires you to register, but I found another one detailing the arrest from 6/7/2017. I love the canned response that has become so familiar sounding over the last 10 or so months. All that's missing is referring to him as the 'coffee boy'.

 

Here's the full London Times article for any so interested.

Quote

Revealed: how Russia invaded the heart of British power

The Kremlin’s manipulation of the American election began with Brexit.

Andrew Gilligan unravels the connections between Team Trump, the referendum vote and Moscow

 

Three days ago, in a Russian government building in Kensington, west London, a group of Russia’s closest British friends gathered for an event. The speaker was interesting: Neil Kent, a Cambridge professor who co-convened a prestigious intelligence seminar at the university, regularly attended by some of the biggest names in the spy world — until he resigned last year over accusations that the seminar was linked to the Kremlin.

The group holding Thursday’s event was even more interesting: the Westminster Russia Forum, which calls itself “the United Kingdom’s premier exponent of neutral and positive relations between the UK and Russia”. The forum is the successor to the Conservative Friends of Russia, which had to disband in 2012 after a number of MPs resigned from its board amid allegations that it amounted to “Tories for Putin”.

The forum’s world view is perhaps best summed up by its deputy chairman, John Bonar, who speaks in its official video of his admiration for the “tremendous achievements that are being made now, reasserting Russia’s might as a world power”.

There are no MPs on the board of the Westminster Russia Forum, but what there are is even more intriguing: several senior figures from the campaign for Britain to leave the European Union.

The forum’s director of membership and chairman of its campaign committee is Andrew Barrand, former deputy campaign director of Vote Leave, former election agent for the chancellor, Philip Hammond, and now a staff member for a Tory MP. The forum’s political director, Morgan Brobyn, was deputy director of Vote Leave in Wales.

Nigel Sussman, the forum’s commercial director, is a member of Ukip’s national executive and a former parliamentary candidate for the party. In March, Sussman took an official trip to Russian-annexed Crimea, coming back with a glowing report of how its takeover by the Kremlin was justified and its people had “always considered Russia as their motherland”. Russia, he said, is a “democratic country” that is being “demonised”.

With the plea agreement made in America last Monday, in which Donald Trump’s former aide George Papadopoulos admitted his contacts with Russia during the Trump presidential election campaign, it was the week when the possible connections between Moscow and the unexpected political earthquakes of the past 18 months — Trump, Brexit — suddenly came into sharp focus. And a striking number of the strands in the web run through Britain.

The meeting at which Papadopoulos said he was offered “thousands of emails” of “dirt” on Hillary Clinton by a man with “high-level Russian government” contacts took place in April 2016 in a London hotel. The ”professor” said to have made the offer, Joseph Mifsud, is a globetrotting Maltese academic at the University of Stirling in Scotland. (Mifsud denies Papadopoulos’s claims).

Another source of dirt on Clinton, Julian Assange’s WikiLeaks, is based in London too. In the run-up to the presidential election, WikiLeaks published thousands of damaging emails hacked from Clinton staffers’ accounts, in what US intelligence says was part of a Russian plot to promote Trump’s victory. The CIA director, Mike Pompeo, said WikiLeaks was a “hostile intelligence service often abetted by state actors like Russia”.

The Trump campaign was in touch with Assange through intermediaries. Last month it emerged that Cambridge Analytica, a data-mining firm that worked for Trump, had approached Assange during the campaign seeking the release of further Clinton emails, which Assange says he turned down.

Curiously, Nigel Farage, the former Ukip leader, visited Assange’s bolthole in March (he was with a producer for LBC radio and insists it was a journalistic mission, although no journalism seems to have resulted from the visit).

Cambridge Analytica claims to be able to construct a precise “psychographic profile” of individuals from their social media posts, Facebook likes and internet use and says it was “instrumental” in Trump’s victory, “identifying supporters, persuading undecided voters and driving turnout to the polls”. It, too, is based in London; its chief executive, Alexander Nix, is an Old Etonian. Its vice-president was Steve Bannon, godfather of the “alt-right”, Trump’s campaign director and former White House chief strategist. It is largely owned and funded by Robert Mercer, a key Trump donor who introduced Bannon to Trump.

Members of the US House of Representatives intelligence committee, which last week grilled Facebook about the impact of fake Russian messages on the US election, are also investigating whether Cambridge Analytica played any part in disseminating or promoting them. Its inquiries, according to a committee source, have proved “fruitful”.

In February 2016 Nix wrote that Cambridge Analytica had “teamed up with” Leave.EU, the Ukip-linked Brexit campaign, and had “already helped supercharge Leave.EU’s social media campaign”. A Cambridge Analytica executive, Brittany Kaiser, was on the panel at Leave.EU’s press launch in October 2015. Leave.EU’s communications director, Andy Wigmore, said Cambridge Analytica had been “happy to help” Leave.EU.

The Brexit referendum was the “petri dish” for the Trump campaign, Wigmore added: “We shared a lot of information because what they were trying to do and what we were trying to do had massive parallels.”

Both Cambridge Analytica and Leave.EU have since changed their stories. The company now insists it has “never been retained by Leave.EU or provided any services, paid or unpaid, to Leave.EU or any other of the [Brexit] campaigns”.

The Electoral Commission in Britain is investigating whether Leave.EU accepted “impermissible donations, including of services”, saying there are “reasonable grounds to suspect that potential offences under the law have occurred”.

The head and chief funder of Leave.EU, the businessman Arron Banks, gave or lent more than £8m to the cause, but there have been persistent questions about where he gets his money from. In 2013, according to an investigation by Open Democracy, a left-wing campaign group, Banks was in financial “trouble” but “a year later these financial worries seem to have completely evaporated”.

The Labour MP Ben Bradshaw raised Banks’s wealth in parliament in the context of “widespread concern over foreign, and particularly Russian, interference in western democracies”. Banks’s wife, Katya, is Russian; her father is a Russian government official. Her first British husband, before Banks, was questioned by Special Branch.

Banks has dismissed the idea of a link between Russia and Brexit as “complete bollocks from beginning to end” and attacked Bradshaw, who is gay, as “Bent Ben”.

Last week the Electoral Commission announced a second investigation — this time into Banks and whether he was “the true source” of his donations and loans to Leave.EU.

“Dark money” — cash channelled to disguise its real origin — was a key funding stream for the “leave” campaign. A shadowy Glasgow-based group called the Constitutional Research Council (CRC) donated £425,000 to Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist Party, which used much of it to buy “leave” advertising outside Northern Ireland.

Northern Irish political funding was not at the time subject to the same disclosure requirements as the rest of the UK.

The CRC has refused to say where the money came from but Scotland, with its independence movement, is a keen focus of Russian interest; the Kremlin’s Sputnik news agency has established its British headquarters in Edinburgh, not London.

Britain also appears to have seen some suspicious social media activity during the referendum, although the tech companies have so far been less forthcoming about the UK than about the US.

Researchers at City, University of London found that 13,500 fake Twitter accounts tweeted extensively about the referendum, largely in favour of “leave”, only to disappear just after the vote. A handful of the 2,700 fake accounts set up by a Russian “troll farm” to undermine the US election tweeted referendum- related content as well. Interestingly, Westminster Russia Forum’s deputy chairman and “technical director,” Slava Jefremov, works for Google, according to his LinkedIn page, and has his own data-mining consultancy, although that may be simple coincidence.

The two Electoral Commission investigations join two others — by the Information Commissioner’s Office and the Commons digital, culture, media and sport committee — into the use of data in politics and the broader phenomenon of “fake news”. But compared with the US they seem slow and feeble.

The Electoral Commission has taken almost 18 months to act. Only in the past two weeks have Facebook, Twitter and Google been officially asked whether they know of any Russian-linked attempts to influence UK politics through their platforms.

For some, that is because there is nothing to see. “People are trying to find excuses for why they lost, whether it’s the Russians or social media witchcraft,” said a leading “leave” campaigner. “There was no magic to it. Voters were hurting and the ‘remain’ case was badly made.”

Trump staffers say Cambridge Analytica has overhyped its role in the campaign, which they claim was minor. Some say there is relatively little evidence that psychographics even works and technically illiterate critics are bestowing on it a power it does not deserve.

Yet against that must be set Banks’s statement that “artificial intelligence won it for ‘leave’” and clear evidence of the impact on Brexit and the US election result of people who previously did not vote. Such voters are disproportionately influenced by the internet and social media, election studies have shown.

Whoever is signing the cheques, the explosion in paid political campaigning on Facebook, with its massive reach and non-UK base, has dramatically eroded the decades-old rules — such as constituency spending limits, donor declarations and the television advertising ban — designed to limit the power of money in British elections. And if London does turn out to be the centre of a Kremlin operation to harm the West, there is a reason. For years Britain has enjoyed taking Russian money too much to ask awkward questions.

“Russian money in Britain is notoriously bloody everywhere,” said Ben Nimmo, information defence fellow at the Atlantic Council think tank. “When the British go to Ukraine or wherever and lecture them on money laundering, they just laugh. They say: you are the biggest money laundering place there is.”

Using leaked documents Bill Browder, a British-American financier and anti-corruption campaigner, has detailed how stolen Russian money has been laundered through a network of banks, companies and purchases in 12 countries, including Britain.

Eleven of those countries have begun criminal investigations and frozen the assets, Browder said. Only the UK has refused to act.

“Every single time we have filed a complaint, nobody has responded,” he said.

“They have always found excuses not to investigate. This country is levitating off 

the flow of dirty money. If that money was stopped, certain people would find themselves without businesses and I think those people have some political weight in this country.”

City of London police have now opened an investigation into another chunk of stolen money discovered by Browder.

The original source of some of Browder’s information, Alexander Perepilichnyy, was found dead near his Surrey home in 2012. Police still claim foul play was not involved despite an expert detecting signs of a poison in his stomach and intelligence agencies across the West concluding it was an assassination.

Perepilichnyy is one of 14 people connected with opposition to Putin to have died mysteriously in Britain in recent years. US intelligence sources told the BuzzFeed news website there is evidence that all the cases were assassinations by Russian state security or mafia groups. But none has been treated as murder by British police, to the anger of some of our allies.

A senior national security adviser to the British government told BuzzFeed that ministers were not prepared to take the “political risk of dealing firmly and effectively . . . with the activities of the Russian state and Russian-organised crime in the UK” because they were afraid. The Kremlin could, he said, inflict massive harm on Britain.

Maybe the investigations into Russian influence in British politics will end up in the same way. But Andrew Foxall, director of the Russia Studies Centre at the Henry Jackson Society think tank, said it is “highly unlikely that something will not be discovered”. And the vigour of the US inquiry could put some backbone into the weedy Brits.

The Americans might even have a British Papadopoulos for us, a secondary figure to flush out the bigger fry. Earlier this year George Cottrell, a close aide to Farage during the referendum campaign, received a remarkably light sentence after being caught offering to launder drug money in the US.

Cottrell’s plea bargain shows he provided unspecified “information” to the authorities and suggests the possibility that “additional agreements” exist under seal. It might be nothing, but it could put a few names in the dock.

 

 

Edited by SaintsInDome2006

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, cosjobs said:

Ross — a billionaire industrialist — retains an interest in a shipping company, Navigator Holdings, that was partially owned by his former investment company. One of Navigator’s most important business relationships is with a Russian energy firm controlled, in turn, by Putin’s son-in-law and other members of the Russian president’s inner circle.

A Sec. of Commerce who headed one of the world's most notorious money laundering banks, especially for Russians, was always wrong. But the fact he is actually in business [shares business interests] with Putin's own family is new. The press can dig as deep on this as they choose to.

Quote

Ross, through a Commerce Department spokesperson, issued a statement saying that he recuses himself as secretary from any matters regarding transoceanic shipping...

That's as bad as Sessions. We have a Commerce Secretary who has to recuse himself from decisions on a whole industry.

Quote

And a cursory look at Navigator’s annual reports reveal an apparent conflict of interest. Navigator’s second-largest client is SIBUR, the Russian petrochemical giant. According to Navigator’s 2017 SEC filing, SIBUR was listed among its top five clients, based on total revenue for the previous two years. In 2016, Navigator’s annual reports show SIBUR brought in $23.2 million in revenue and another $28.7 million the following year.

The business relationship has been so profitable that in January, around the time Ross was being vetted for his Cabinet position, Navigator held a naming ceremony for two state-of-the-art tankers on long-term leases to SIBUR.

One of the owners of SIBUR is Gennady Timchenko, a Russian billionaire on the Treasury Department’s sanctions list. He has been barred from entering the U.S. since 2014 because authorities consider him a Specially Designated National, or SDN, who is considered by Treasury to be a member “of the Russian leadership’s inner circle.”

The Treasury Department statement said that Timchenko’s activities in the energy sector “have been directly linked to Putin” and that Putin had investments with a company previously owned by Timchenko, as well as access to the company’s funds.

...Another major SIBUR shareholder is Leonid Mikhelson, who, like Timchenko, has close ties to the Kremlin. One of his companies, Novatek, Russia’s second-largest natural gas producer, was placed on the Treasury’s sanctions list in 2014.

...A third shareholder of SIBUR – and deputy chairman of the board – is Kirill Shamalov, husband of Vladimir Putin’s daughter, Katerina Tikhonova. After the wedding, Shamalov’s meteoric rise to wealth led him to own as much as 21.3 percent of SIBUR’s stock until April, when he sold off around 17 percent for a reported $2 billion.

“It’s a new generation which is currently being prepared and groomed... to inherit whatever power and wealth Putin's team has accumulated over the past years,” said Vladimir Milov, a former deputy energy minister in Putin’s government who is now working with the opposition.

...Richard Painter, the chief White House ethics lawyer during the George W. Bush administration, said there needs to a close examination of whether Ross’ testimony to the Senate violated perjury laws. Painter also said Ross must recuse himself from all Russia-related matters because of the SIBUR connection.

“Secretary Ross cannot participate in any discussion or decision-making or recommendation about sanctions imposed on Russia or on Russian nationals when he owns a company that is doing business with Russian nationals who are either under sanctions or who could come under sanctions in any future sanctions regime,” Painter said. “That would be a criminal offense for him to participate in any such matter.”

 

Edited by SaintsInDome2006
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, cosjobs said:

America is facing an epistemic crisis

What if Mueller proves his case and it doesn’t matter?

Fwiw here is a piece on the impact of investigations into Russian influence in Brexit and how that might lead to a reversal of what happened there.

Quote

Putin’s self-harming passion for subversion seems to be the toxic product of a KGB background, a nationalist’s anger at the decline of the superpower and a lack of other, more acceptable, ways of advancing Russia’s agenda. As Putin pushes his spies, trolls, diplomats and lobbyists to take every opportunity to divide, distract and disrupt the west, whatever the long-term cost, he risks making his country into a pariah state.

It is possible that his active measures helped tip the balance in the Brexitreferendum. Even more likely, they will help tip the balance back.

- I realize that that's the UK not the US but I personally am not underestimating America's sense of pride and its determination to protect itself from foreign influence and corruption.

Edited by SaintsInDome2006
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not that I necessarily believe a word she says, but the Russian lawyer is talking again.  Something something about Donnie Jr requesting a quid pro quo:

Quote

A Russian lawyer who met with President Donald Trump’s oldest son last year says he indicated that a law targeting Russia could be re-examined if his father won the election and asked her for written evidence that illegal proceeds went to Hillary Clinton’s campaign.

The lawyer, Natalia Veselnitskaya, said in a two-and-a-half-hour interview in Moscow that she would tell these and other things to the Senate Judiciary Committee on condition that her answers be made public, something it hasn’t agreed to. She has received scores of questions from the committee, which is investigating possible collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign. Veselnitskaya said she’s also ready -- if asked -- to testify to Special Counsel Robert Mueller

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-11-06/trump-jr-said-anti-russia-law-may-be-reviewed-moscow-lawyer-says

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, SaintsInDome2006 said:

A Sec. of Commerce who headed one of the world's most notorious money laundering banks, especially for Russians, was always wrong. But the fact he is actually in business [shares business interests] with Putin's own family is new. The press can dig as deep on this as they choose to.

That's as bad as Sessions. We have a Commerce Secretary who has to recuse himself from decisions on a whole industry.

 

I'm still in awe that his ownership in the Bank of Cyprus never got more scrutiny.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, SaintsInDome2006 said:

I personally am not underestimating America's sense of pride and its determination to protect itself from foreign influence and corruption.

I think this will split along the same Trump/not Trump fault lines as everything else. 

Edited by Dinsy Ejotuz
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Dinsy Ejotuz said:

I think this will split along the same Trump/not Trump fault lines as everything else. 

Yeah, that is by far the most likely outcome IMO. Fox will minimize and deflect even in the face of clear-cut guilt (and let’s be honest here, we’re really there already — no one can seriously believe that Trump himself didn’t know what was going on) and their viewers will swallow it down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Koya said:

Which raises the question, why didn't the authorities put the screws to him years ago? Everyone knew the guy was likely mafiad up, then Russia mobbed up.  Is it just that we don't really care about the very wealthy doing this crap, or perhaps there were other reasons Donnie was allowed to roam free and pillage the pockets of folks from around the globe through fraudulent business practices (and possible being at least tangentially involved in worse, as a result)

White collar money laundering is exceptionally hard to prove until it isn't (if that makes any sense).  You have umpteen layered LLCs (most of them in Delaware or Nevada to give the facade of legitimacy...since they are US entities they are given the benefit of the doubt 99 times out of 100) transacting with each other from bank accounts in Cyprus, Seychelles, Caymen, Isle of Man.  More often than not the LLCs are "owned" by US lawyers with the place of business as the Delaware registered company (the real minutes/ownership is only put in place after that initial filing, if even then).  That allows the LLC to get a US bank account and a US Tax ID.  Then you can deed over whatever you want.  WA LA a "clean" US entity that can start to launder money through more and more real estate transactions since no one is regulating the transactions (the only real trace is the bank wires).  You do it over and over with other LLCs owning, etc.

So it's very hard to unravel...that is until all the documents are in one place in front you (and I do mean all the docs...you need all the underlying LLCs that own the LLCs to get a full picture).  If you have them, the activity is painfully obvious (Manafort, Paul), but if you don't then it all looks legitimate.  

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, cosjobs said:

America is facing an epistemic crisis

What if Mueller proves his case and it doesn’t matter?

That's a really worrisome scenario to me. If there are no ramifications for him selling influence to Putin, then there are no ramifications for just about any authoritarian action he might want to take in the indefinite future (I think there's more to worry about than just the next seven years). The more bad behavior is normalized, the worse the bad behavior will become.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, roadkill1292 said:

That's a really worrisome scenario to me. If there are no ramifications for him selling influence to Putin, then there are no ramifications for just about any authoritarian action he might want to take in the indefinite future (I think there's more to worry about than just the next seven years). The more bad behavior is normalized, the worse the bad behavior will become.

It also says something when much of our country simply prefers to identify with Russian nationalists that share more of their world view than with actual American Patriots who wish to protect democracy and all its inherent messiness (especially diversity of views, people and culture).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Sammy3469 said:

Not that I necessarily believe a word she says, but the Russian lawyer is talking again.  Something something about Donnie Jr requesting a quid pro quo:

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-11-06/trump-jr-said-anti-russia-law-may-be-reviewed-moscow-lawyer-says

Hmmmmm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, roadkill1292 said:
8 hours ago, cosjobs said:

America is facing an epistemic crisis

What if Mueller proves his case and it doesn’t matter?

That's a really worrisome scenario to me.

It’s worrisome because it could effectively end American democracy as we know it, but also because it seems not just vaguely plausible, but actually pretty darn likely. (I really hope I’m being overly dramatic, but I don’t think I am.)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Maurile Tremblay said:

It’s worrisome because it could effectively end American democracy as we know it, but also because it seems not just vaguely plausible, but actually pretty darn likely. (I really hope I’m being overly dramatic, but I don’t think I am.)

Yeah, I worry about looking overly dramatic, too. But having said that, I think it's really odd that concerns about increasing authoritarianism -- with a commensurate decrease in representative democracy -- are being voiced all across the left-leaning spectrum but little is heard from the right. A more suspicious mind would suspect that those outlets have a particular interest in not bringing the subject up at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now