What's new
Fantasy Football - Footballguys Forums

Welcome to Our Forums. Once you've registered and logged in, you're primed to talk football, among other topics, with the sharpest and most experienced fantasy players on the internet.

New Zealand - Anyone Been? What's It Like? (1 Viewer)

Joe Bryant

Guide
Staff member
Sadly, New Zealand's been in the news for tragic reasons. But it occurred to me I didn't really know much about what it's like there beyond the Lord Of The Rings scenery and the dance the Rugby team (and others) do that is a native New Zealand thing I think.

Anyone been? Or know much about it?  I know about Google but thought I'd ask here. 

 

CletiusMaximus

Footballguy
I lived there for a year when I was 16. It’s a tremendous place for outdoors stuff - skiing, hiking, rafting, climbing, biking, etc.  I had a great time, played lots of rugby, worked on a sheep farm, met lots of pretty girls, drank lots of beer. Highly recommended if you have the means.  

If you go, I recommend NOT referring to the Maori Hakka as a “dance.” 😉

 

Joe Bryant

Guide
Staff member
I lived there for a year when I was 16. It’s a tremendous place for outdoors stuff - skiing, hiking, rafting, climbing, biking, etc.  I had a great time, played lots of rugby, worked on a sheep farm, met lots of pretty girls, drank lots of beer. Highly recommended if you have the means.  

If you go, I recommend NOT referring to the Maori Hakka as a “dance.” 😉
Thanks. What do they call the Maori Hakka? 

For culture stuff, what's it like?

I see lots of beautiful rural stuff. Is there much urban life too?

What are your impression of the population demographics?

Any comparable places in the US?

Thanks CM

 

Riddick02

Footballguy
Thanks. What do they call the Maori Hakka? 

For culture stuff, what's it like?

I see lots of beautiful rural stuff. Is there much urban life too?

What are your impression of the population demographics?

Any comparable places in the US?

Thanks CM
There are more livestock than people in New Zealand.  Auckland and Wellington are very city like but not by the scale of Chicago or NY standards.  Places like Rotorua or Napier remind me of suburb cities but most others towns are smaller.  Only did the north island so can't say too much for the south island, but my understanding is it's even more rural. 

Fun fact, there are no indigenous predatory mammals in New Zealand.  Any that are there now were introduced by man, and I think the largest is wild dog sized. 

 

kutta

Footballguy
My wife and I took an Australia/New Zealand cruise a couple years ago. It was absolutely amazing. We started in Sydney, went to Melbourne, over to Tasmania, then over to New Zealand where we had 6 stops.

Our favorite town was called Akaroa, which actually is very close to Christ Church where the shootings happened. It is a beautiful little town with the prettiest water I’ve ever seen. Great fish and chips too.

We stayed in Auckland for 3 days. We really liked it there - it felt like a mini-New York. It had an edge we didn’t feel in any of the small towns we were in - but we liked it. It’s the sailing capital of the world, and our hotel had floor to ceiling sliding windows that opened all the way around, right on the water. It was the coolest hotel room I’ve ever stayed in.

The people in both Australia and NZ were the nicest people I’ve met anywhere. Just so accommodating and friendly everywhere. From the servers to the bus drivers to the people on the street, everyone was wonderful.

Great place, one of my absolute favorite places I’ve visited. 

 

Joe Bryant

Guide
Staff member
There are more livestock than people in New Zealand.  Auckland and Wellington are very city like but not by the scale of Chicago or NY standards.  Places like Rotorua or Napier remind me of suburb cities but most others towns are smaller.  Only did the north island so can't say too much for the south island, but my understanding is it's even more rural. 

Fun fact, there are no indigenous predatory mammals in New Zealand.  Any that are there now were introduced by man, and I think the largest is wild dog sized. 
Thanks. 

From a cultural vibe, is it fair to say Australia is similar? And how do Australia people feel about New Zealand? I always sort of thought it was a "little brother" type thing where there was some tension but didn't know if it was real or just smack talk. 

 

rascal

Footballguy
I was there for a week and Australia for five weeks during college.  Absolutely loved it with beautiful scenery and the people were very nice.  Played a scrimmage game against some rugby guys that were trying to get onto the blacks squad.  Never had my ### kicked so thoroughly, and yet in a fun way, my entire life.  Went parasailing and toured the country and got to watch a Maori festival (boys coming of age i think).  Lots of sheep.  Stayed in northern island only before going to Australia.  I loved it and if US goes to hell they are on my shortlist of places to move to.

New Zealand and Australia are competitive, but nothing serious.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

rascal

Footballguy
Thanks. 

From a cultural vibe, is it fair to say Australia is similar? And how do Australia people feel about New Zealand? I always sort of thought it was a "little brother" type thing where there was some tension but didn't know if it was real or just smack talk. 
Smack talk.  As far as comparing the cultures of the two, they are similar in their white heritage but whereas Australia has ignored/purged its ethnic history new Zealand as more embraced it.  But both are very nice folks, spend lots of times outdoors, and welcoming of foreigners.  At least until a damn aircraft carrier shows up and the sailors piss off the locals and they no longer give you free drinks.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Joe Bryant

Guide
Staff member
Smack talk.  As far as comparing the cultures of the two, they are similar in their white heritage but whereas Australia has ignored/purged its ethnic history new Zealand as more embraced it.
Thanks. What's the relationship between White people and New Zealand's original people? What are the right words there?

And I know you're not the spokesperson. I should ask it better saying, "what's you're perception of it"

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Rodrigo Duterte

Footballguy
Auckland and Raglan.  It was like going back to the 80's, dug it, I could live there.  My friend married a local gal and never looked back.  One child, a home by the sea, a cabin on higher ground, and he could not be happier.

And yeah, the little/big brother thing with Oz is apropos.

 

Riddick02

Footballguy
Everywhere we went the Kiwis were welcoming to everyone, but a lot of them sure made it a point to emphasis that Aussies are #######s.  :shrug:

 
Last edited by a moderator:

gianmarco

Footballguy
I lived there for a year when I was 16. It’s a tremendous place for outdoors stuff - skiing, hiking, rafting, climbing, biking, etc.  I had a great time, played lots of rugby, worked on a sheep farm, met lots of pretty girls, drank lots of beer. Highly recommended if you have the means.  

If you go, I recommend NOT referring to the Maori Hakka as a “dance.😉
Pretty amazing video

 

CletiusMaximus

Footballguy
Thanks. What do they call the Maori Hakka? 

For culture stuff, what's it like?

I see lots of beautiful rural stuff. Is there much urban life too?

What are your impression of the population demographics?

Any comparable places in the US?

Thanks CM
I don't have much time today, but will hit a few of these for now.

The Maori are the NZ native people (similar to Aboriginal Aussies).  The hakka is a war ritual, a very cool, spiritual thing.  Most foreigners are familiar with it from the rugby team doing one before each game.

There are a couple big modern cities - Aukland, Wellington in the north island, Christchurch in the south, but for the most part it is rural, small cities.

NZ is two islands - two mountains sticking up out of the sea.  You can be skiing in legit alpine pro-level mountain resort in the morning, and be kayaking in the ocean a couple hours later - similar to the US Northwest or BC I suppose.

NZ is a member of the British Commonwealth (like Australia).  I lived there in 1982 during the Falkland Islands "war", and NZ sent troops to support the British as part of their obligations as members of the commonwealth.  The English queen is on their currency and the British royals are huge celebrities there.

NZ was a proud nuclear-free zone when I lived there - don't know if that's still the case.  This means that even the British navy could not dock their nuclear subs or even pass through NZ waters (or maybe they allowed it, but there was a huge protest or something, I can't quite recall.)

I absolutely love the country and the people.  I am still in touch with the family I lived with and several friends, although most of what we email about is rubgy, particularly these days the upcoming world cup this fall.

 

CletiusMaximus

Footballguy
If you ever meet a Kiwi, I would strongly advise against using a big brother/little brother analogy to describe their relationship with Australia.  While that may seem appropriate to us, no New Zealander would agree with that characterization in the slightest. They have a big chip on their shoulder on this topic. This would be like meeting someone from Philadelphia and saying their city is like a little brother to big New York.

 

Rodrigo Duterte

Footballguy
If you ever meet a Kiwi, I would strongly advise against using a big brother/little brother analogy to describe their relationship with Australia.  While that may seem appropriate to us, no New Zealander would agree with that characterization in the slightest. They have a big chip on their shoulder on this topic. This would be like meeting someone from Philadelphia and saying their city is like a little brother to big New York.
Funny, I was going to use a similar analogy.  Vancouver / Toronto would also work.  The little brother thing I alluded to above was not a positive one.

 

msommer

Footballguy
Never been but worked with three or four guys that had lived there. Never heard a disparaging word. Not one.

It's on the list

 

Joe Bryant

Guide
Staff member
CletiusMaximus said:
I don't have much time today, but will hit a few of these for now.

The Maori are the NZ native people (similar to Aboriginal Aussies).  The hakka is a war ritual, a very cool, spiritual thing.  Most foreigners are familiar with it from the rugby team doing one before each game.

There are a couple big modern cities - Aukland, Wellington in the north island, Christchurch in the south, but for the most part it is rural, small cities.

NZ is two islands - two mountains sticking up out of the sea.  You can be skiing in legit alpine pro-level mountain resort in the morning, and be kayaking in the ocean a couple hours later - similar to the US Northwest or BC I suppose.

NZ is a member of the British Commonwealth (like Australia).  I lived there in 1982 during the Falkland Islands "war", and NZ sent troops to support the British as part of their obligations as members of the commonwealth.  The English queen is on their currency and the British royals are huge celebrities there.

NZ was a proud nuclear-free zone when I lived there - don't know if that's still the case.  This means that even the British navy could not dock their nuclear subs or even pass through NZ waters (or maybe they allowed it, but there was a huge protest or something, I can't quite recall.)

I absolutely love the country and the people.  I am still in touch with the family I lived with and several friends, although most of what we email about is rubgy, particularly these days the upcoming world cup this fall.
Awesome. Thanks.

 

Joe Bryant

Guide
Staff member
If you ever meet a Kiwi, I would strongly advise against using a big brother/little brother analogy to describe their relationship with Australia.  While that may seem appropriate to us, no New Zealander would agree with that characterization in the slightest. They have a big chip on their shoulder on this topic. This would be like meeting someone from Philadelphia and saying their city is like a little brother to big New York.
That's what I meant. Of course I'd never say that to a New Zealand person but the little brother with a chip on his shoulder thing was what I'd heard. 

 

Major

Footballguy
Still on the my bucket list to visit but I have some really good friends from there.  All the Kiwis I've met are really friendly and humble people.  I'd say they're more Canada while the US is Australia.  Always good schtick to call them Aussies.  

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Joe Bryant

Guide
Staff member
Still on the my bucket list to visit but I have some really good friends from there.  All the Kiwis I've met are really friendly and humble people.  I'd say they're more Canada while the US is Australia.  Always good schtick to call them Aussies.  
Sorry for dumb question. Is "Kiwi" an ok word to use for all New Zealanders?

 

peaces

Footballguy
kutta said:
My wife and I took an Australia/New Zealand cruise a couple years ago. It was absolutely amazing. We started in Sydney, went to Melbourne, over to Tasmania, then over to New Zealand where we had 6 stops.

Our favorite town was called Akaroa, which actually is very close to Christ Church where the shootings happened. It is a beautiful little town with the prettiest water I’ve ever seen. Great fish and chips too.

We stayed in Auckland for 3 days. We really liked it there - it felt like a mini-New York. It had an edge we didn’t feel in any of the small towns we were in - but we liked it. It’s the sailing capital of the world, and our hotel had floor to ceiling sliding windows that opened all the way around, right on the water. It was the coolest hotel room I’ve ever stayed in.

The people in both Australia and NZ were the nicest people I’ve met anywhere. Just so accommodating and friendly everywhere. From the servers to the bus drivers to the people on the street, everyone was wonderful.

Great place, one of my absolute favorite places I’ve visited. 
What cruise line did you go on? My wife and I are seriously considering something along the lines of yours. Thanks for the info and the thread op.

 

kutta

Footballguy
What cruise line did you go on? My wife and I are seriously considering something along the lines of yours. Thanks for the info and the thread op.
We used Holland America for that cruise. It was very cool - the only downside was there was a LOT of old folks on the cruise. We are 53 and 47, so no spring chickens,  but we felt very young.

I’m not sure if it was the cruise location or the cruise line that attracted the old folks. And it didn’t really bother us - we’d rather it that way than a bunch of young folk anyway, but it was a bit odd.

Overall, it was the trio of a lifetime. I can’t recommend it enough.

 

Drunken Cowboy

Footballguy
New Zealand is awesome. I have only visited in winter though. I really want to go back in warmer weather to get to do more outdoor activities. The South Island is one of the most beautiful places on Earth. They also have some great fishing. I liked Auckland, but it is really a pretty generic city. It doesn't feel very Kiwi. I liked Christchurch a lot. Had a day in Wellington, so don't know much about it. I spent a week in Dunedin. It is a fun college town.

 

Atomic Punk

Footballguy
My wife and I are going for a month in March with a pretty even split between the two islands. Lots of hiking and wineries are on the itinerary.  Any suggestions are welcome!

 

Da Guru

Fair & Balanced
Was in NZ for a week and Australia for a week 10 years ago.  If all my family and friends were there could live in both easily.

New Zealand is about 2 times smaller than California and has 32 million less people so there is plenty of open space and coast line. People are basically laid back and openly friendly.   It also is a no tipping culture. Nobody tips for anything.

One problem is grocery items are very expensive.  Everything is at least 25% higher.

 

Terminalxylem

Footballguy
Spent our honeymoon on the South Island. Beautiful scenery and very few people. Some of the best hiking in the world. We rented a camper an alternated cushy camping with a couple nights at several resorts around the island. Highly recommend touring the island like that. And try to get a manual transmission for the full effect of driving on the “wrong” side of the road.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Atomic Punk

Footballguy
We’ve booked Air BNB’s and driving around both islands. Booked a mid size SUV. Was going to do the camper van but it was kind of pricy in comparison for what you get compared to Air BNB. I love driving but a little nervous driving on the wrong side of the car just as much as I am on the wrong side of the road. We’re planning on lots of hiking and a few wineries. Hopefully still catch some beach weather on the north island.

 

Ted Stickles

Footballguy
New Zealand is about 2 times smaller than California and has 32 million less people so there is plenty of open space and coast line. 
While accurate, this is very misleading when driving there.  New Zealand roads are different, Allow extra time.

My girlfriend and I spent three weeks there two years ago.  We flew into and rented a station wagon in Christchurch and did a large circle of the South Island in about ten days.  We took the car on the ferry and did the North in 10 days.  Three weeks and we felt very rushed and missed a ton of stuff.  We stayed at a mix of AirBnB's and camping at the holiday parks. 

Driving in NZ was one of my favorite memories.  It was completely stress-free.  Every driver on the road went at the same posted speed limit pace.  It was the exact opposite of road rage America.  There are only single-lane highways for 98% of the country with very slow maximum speed limits but these posted speeds are respected by all drivers.  If you were constantly passing, you would stick out like a sore thumb and be easily identified as a tourist.  There are passing lanes and the slower drivers would pull over to the slow lane immediately.

I miss the stress-free simplicity of those NZ roads.  I loved the country and that  was one of our most memorable trips.  We definitely preferred the more scenic, natural beauty of the less populated South Island.  Highly recommend going, but try to double the amount of time you are thinking of going for. 

 

msommer

Footballguy
We’ve booked Air BNB’s and driving around both islands. Booked a mid size SUV. Was going to do the camper van but it was kind of pricy in comparison for what you get compared to Air BNB. I love driving but a little nervous driving on the wrong side of the car just as much as I am on the wrong side of the road. We’re planning on lots of hiking and a few wineries. Hopefully still catch some beach weather on the north island.
Don't worry about driving on the wrong side of the road. You'll get it fast. What guaranteed will happen are three things

1: You keep going to the wrong side of the car when it is parked

2: When wanting to signal a turn, you'll turn on the windshield wipers

3: When wanting to cross a road on foot you'll almost be run over at least once since you'll be looking left and then stepping out in traffic 

Assuming you survive 3, you'll be fine

;)

 

FreeBaGeL

Footballguy
Don't worry about driving on the wrong side of the road. You'll get it fast. What guaranteed will happen are three things

1: You keep going to the wrong side of the car when it is parked

2: When wanting to signal a turn, you'll turn on the windshield wipers

3: When wanting to cross a road on foot you'll almost be run over at least once since you'll be looking left and then stepping out in traffic 

Assuming you survive 3, you'll be fine

;)
Yeah the only thing that ever really freaked me out a little was similar to #3, in that the first few times I came up to a large roundabout while driving I would look the wrong way for oncoming traffic in the roundabout.

 

FreeBaGeL

Footballguy
My wife and I are going for a month in March with a pretty even split between the two islands. Lots of hiking and wineries are on the itinerary.  Any suggestions are welcome!
If you're making a stop in Wanaka I would highly recommend this.  Probably my wife and I's favorite thing we did in 10 days on the South Island.

It's an amazing place, you will have a blast.

 

Atomic Punk

Footballguy
Thanks for the advice on the driving. I’m probably overthinking it and will manage fine. We’ve built in a lot of extra time to get to places. I’m not one for rushing and want to experience the land and people more than anything.

 

NutterButter

Footballguy
If you're making a stop in Wanaka I would highly recommend this.  Probably my wife and I's favorite thing we did in 10 days on the South Island.

It's an amazing place, you will have a blast.
That looks absolutely amazing and really might be one of the coolest things I've ever seen on the net.   That is an absolute bucket list item.   

 

PlayaHata

Footballguy
NutterButter said:
That looks absolutely amazing and really might be one of the coolest things I've ever seen on the net.   That is an absolute bucket list item.   
HFS that looks incredible, but I am pretty scared of heights.  Not sure I'd be able to handle that.  I did the Sydney Bridge climb when we were in Australia a few years ago and was able to manage that though.  @FreeBaGeL do you remember which of the 3 climbs you did?

 
Last edited by a moderator:

NutterButter

Footballguy
HFS that looks incredible, but I am pretty scared of heights.  Not sure I'd be able to handle that.  I did the Sydney Bridge climb when we were in Australia a few years ago and was able to manage that though.  @FreeBaGeL do you remember which of the 3 climbs you did?
I'm a little myself but I still feel I need to do this.   That is my idea of an experience of a lifetime.   A lot more affordable than I would've thought.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

FreeBaGeL

Footballguy
HFS that looks incredible, but I am pretty scared of heights.  Not sure I'd be able to handle that.  I did the Sydney Bridge climb when we were in Australia a few years ago and was able to manage that though.  @FreeBaGeL do you remember which of the 3 climbs you did?
I did the middle one.  The very top one was actually closed for repairs when we were there but I don't think we'd have done that one anyways as my wife and upper body strength don't really go together and it sounded like you needed a decent amount of that at the very top.  I have to admit though the idea of climbing so high you have to be picked up by a helicopter was pretty darn appealing.

I am moderately afraid of heights and this was very doable for me.  I don't really know how to define fear of heights but for instance I've done the Angel's Landing hike and I was scared as heck doing it, but I wasn't one of those people that just froze up and had to have their friends help them back down.  If you get that paralyzed by heights than this may be too much, but with merely a moderate fear of heights it was not really a problem.  My hands were definitely shaking the first time I clipped in on the first "cliff" but at that point it's still low enough that there isn't the sense of vertigo from being up really high.  By the time we got to the really hair raising parts it had been an hour or so and I was moving like a well oiled machine and totally comfortable with it and wasn't really scared at that point.

We had an overweight woman that was very afraid of heights in our group and while she needed extra attention from the guide (the guide basically stayed on her hip the whole time) I'm convinced that if she can get up there without any major problems than pretty much any able bodied person can.

 

Buttonhook

Footballguy
Don't worry about driving on the wrong side of the road. You'll get it fast. What guaranteed will happen are three things

1: You keep going to the wrong side of the car when it is parked

2: When wanting to signal a turn, you'll turn on the windshield wipers

3: When wanting to cross a road on foot you'll almost be run over at least once since you'll be looking left and then stepping out in traffic 

Assuming you survive 3, you'll be fine

;)
4.  You'll have to drive through a herd of sheep (especially on the more remote parts of the South Island).

 

Tick

Footballguy
Can anyone find the old thread when someone was preparing for a trip to New Zealand?  I listed the rundown of where my family went on the south island in that thread, now I can't find it.

 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top