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Middle Aged Dummies!! Artists #1's have been posted!! (2 Viewers)

29. Wishing You Were Here
Album: Chicago VII (1974)
Writer: Peter Cetera
Lead vocals: Terry Kath (verses), Peter Cetera (bridge)
Released as a single? Yes (US #11)

Wishing You Were Here was one of the last songs recorded for Chicago VII and features some of the Beach Boys, also clients of producer/manager Jim Guercio, on harmony vocals.
Peter Cetera: "There's two people that I always wanted to be, and that was a Beatle or a Beach Boy. I got to meet the Beach Boys at various times and got to be good friends with Carl [Wilson]. I remember I was living on the ocean, messing with the guitar one night, and the waves were rolling in, and I started learning that little lick that opens the song, and my then-lady was lying on the couch sleeping. We were going on the road within the next day or so, and with the waves coming in and that little lick, I wrote about the road."
The song was conceived as a Beach Boys-style thing, and when some of the Beach Boys stopped by Guercio's Caribou Ranch during the recording of Chicago VII, Cetera asked them to sing on the track. Cetera: "I always wanted the Beach Boys to sing on my song, and they said, 'Yeah, we'd love to sing backgrounds on that.' So, I got to do the background harmonies - myself and Carl and Dennis [Wilson] and Alan Jardine. For a night, I was a Beach Boy." It is one of the rare Cetera-penned songs where he does not handle the majority of the lead vocals; during recording, he realized the verses were written for a vocal lower than what he could provide, so he had Terry Kath sing them, and took the bridge for himself. In some more role switching, Kath played bass and Cetera and Guercio played guitar.
The lushness of the song's sound is the first step toward the Cetera balladry that would become the band's signature sound in the late '70s and '80s, but I forgive it for that, because it's executed so well. The vocal arrangement is every bit as good as it sounds like it would be on paper, and I love how the keening analog synth complements the wordless harmonies. Much of the rest of it is textbook what we would later call yacht rock, but it adeptly avoids the sludgy, overly layered production that would come to define the subgenre.
Live version with the Beach Boys on Chicago's New Year's Rockin' Eve 1975: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NlVD_m5KXjw
A while ago Zamboni alerted me to the existence of Leonid and Friends, a Moscow-based band that started out as a Chicago tribute act but has branched into other '70s artists as well. Their covers are stunningly well-executed and I will include links to their performances when they exist for any of my top 31. Here is their cover of Wishing You Were Here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aLAUyc64thU

The first three songs on my list have been Peter Cetera compositions. There are only two more, and they are both collaborations.

Chicago VII was a triumphant return to the strong songs, killer playing and experimental spirit of the band's first three albums -- and like them, it was a double. However, it did not have an auspicious beginning. It was born out of the band growing bored with their stage show and wanting to incorporate more of their jazz roots in it. They began including jazz-flavored instrumentals composed and workshopped during soundchecks, and after coming off the tour for Chicago VI, their second straight No. 1 album, many of the band members thought they were commercially invincible enough to release an album of all jazz instrumentals. After a few weeks in the studio, it was clear that not everyone was onboard with this idea. Cetera and Guercio thought most of the songs weren't working and that releasing an entire album of jazz instrumentals would be commercial suicide. The other members thought some of the material was too good to set aside. So a compromise was reached: the next release would be a double album including the best of the jazz instrumentals and vocal songs in their usual pop-rock style (which enabled Cetera, who had no interest in writing jazz, to get some of his compositions on the record). The experimentation isn't just on the first 1.5 sides of jazz instrumentals, though. Some of the songs on the other 2.5 sides venture into territories the band hadn't explored much before, including hard rock, salsa and funk. Percussionist Laudir de Oliveira played on most tracks, reflecting the band's interest in incorporating Latin rhythms more; he would become a full member of the band for its next album. And some of the original members took on new roles on some tracks: Lee Loughnane sang lead; Kath played bass; Cetera played acoustic guitar; Robert Lamm, who was working on a solo album at the same time, shared a guitar-less song from it; and Loughnane, Walter Parazaider and Danny Seraphine wrote songs.
The result was a triumph on the level of the band's first three albums. The experiments work brilliantly for the most part and some of my under-the-radar picks for the top 31 come from this album. My friend who is big into jazz-rock fusion loves the jazz material on this record, so I'll take his word that it was a success on those grounds. And for all the new directions the album explored, it still produced three hit singles (and a fourth that wasn't released as a single here but was a big hit in South America) and became their third straight No. 1 record.

At #28 is an underappreciated song with powerhouse performances from all three vocalists. If you were watching ABC's summer programming in 1973, you might have seen it on their airwaves.
 
The Decemberists
#29 Here I Dreamt I Was an Architect


Tip of the cap to @Zegras11 for (1) running this and (2) lining up the release schedule perfectly so that Here I Dreamt I Was an Architect pops up on a Sunday morning.

For me, the lyrics is where this song shines. So many clever little couplets that play so nicely with the music.

And here I dreamt I was a soldier
And I marched the streets of Birkenau
And I recall in spring
The perfume that the air would bring
To the indolent town
Where the barkers call the moon down
The carnival was ringing loudly now
And just to lay with you
There's nothing that I wouldn't do
Save lay my rifle down

And try one, and try two
I guess it always comes down to
Alright, it's okay
Guess it's better to turn this way
Hey, hey, hey, hey
Hey, hey, hey, hey

And I am nothing of a builder
But here I dreamt I was an architect
And I built this balustrade
To keep you home, to keep you safe
From the outside world
But the angles and the corners
Even though my work is unparalleled
They never seemed to meet
This structure fell about our feet
And we were free to go

And try one, and try two
Guess it always comes down to
Alright, okay
Guess it's better to turn this way
Hey, hey, hey, hey
Hey, hey, hey, hey

And here in Spain I am a Spaniard
I will be buried with my marionettes
Countess and courtesan
Have fallen 'neath my tender hand
When their husbands were not around
But you, my soiled teenage girlfriend
Oh, while you furrow like the lioness
And we are vagabonds
We travel without seat belts on
To live this close to death

And try one, and try two
I guess it always comes down to
Alright, it's okay
Guess it's better to turn this
But I won, so you lose
Guess it always comes down to
Alright, it's okay
Guess it's better to turn this way
Hey, hey, hey, hey
Hey, hey, hey, hey
 
29. Fear The Voices (B-side, here off The Music Bank, 1999)

(Youtube Version) Fear The Voices

Fear the voices
You hear today
If you steal our choices
We'll blow you away


This song was recorded in 1992, but didn’t make it onto Dirt. When released as a single in 1999, it hit the Mainstream Rock charts (as high as #11), though I don’t really remember hearing any radio play of it. This song’s lyrics were dated even when released, with references to Booth Gardener, who was Washington’s governor in 1992 (but not 1999). Because of that, I debated where it really belonged. In the end, every time I listened to it the groove and energy carried me through enough to slot it here.
 
Brainwashed (1969 - Arthur (Or the Decline of the British Empire))

Brainwashed is the 5th track on the concept album, Arthur, which was originally composed as the soundtrack for a television film that ended up never being produced. Powerful lyrics from Ray Davies on this one. Written in 1969, but do you see just a bit of today in it? Don’t be sheeple!!! The Kinks/Ray were way ahead of their time.

You look like a real human being
But you don't have a mind of your own
Yeah, you can talk, you can breathe
You can work, you can stitch, you can sew
But you're brainwashed
Yes you are, yes you are
Get down on your knees
You've got a job and a house
And a wife, and your kids and a car
Yeah, you're conditioned to be
What they want you to be
And be happy to be where you are
Yes you are
Get down on your knees
Get down on your knees

The aristocrats and bureaucrats
Are dirty rats
For making you what you are
They're up there and you re down here
You're on the ground and they're up with the stars
All your life they've kicked you around and pushed you around
Till you can't take any more
To them you're just a speck of dirt
But you don't want to get up off the floor
Mister you're just brainwashed
They give you social security
Tax saving benefits that grow at maturity
Yeah, you're conditioned to be
What they want you to be
And to do what they want you to
Yes you are, yes you are
Get down on your knees
 
A while ago Zamboni alerted me to the existence of Leonid and Friends, a Moscow-based band that started out as a Chicago tribute act but has branched into other '70s artists as well. Their covers are stunningly well-executed and I will include links to their performances when they exist for any of my top 31. Here is their cover of Wishing You Were Here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aLAUyc64thU
Thanks for giving them more love. Pip. I am in awe of Leonid & Friends and hope to see them again this summer if my schedule permits.
 
Just got back to the hotel after spending all morning at the RRHOF. I wish I could have shared pics with you all as I was going along!

It was a moving experience for sure, for those of our ilk ❤️
I've never been to the RRHOF (or Cleveland), but I hope to one day. I loved visiting Ashtabula, Ohio, when I was little.
 
Intelligence

I never thought much either way about this Jason Reese yowlfest back when The Secret of Elena's Tomb EP was released, just after Source Tags & Codes had come along and blown a lot of our minds. But I have rediscovered it and think it's a pretty fun and interesting, albeit noisy and not particularly decipherable little piece. One more coming from Tomb, much later, a little more mainstream, and there had been a third on the bubble.
 
29. Fear The Voices (B-side, here off The Music Bank, 1999)

(Youtube Version) Fear The Voices

Fear the voices
You hear today
If you steal our choices
We'll blow you away


This song was recorded in 1992, but didn’t make it onto Dirt. When released as a single in 1999, it hit the Mainstream Rock charts (as high as #11), though I don’t really remember hearing any radio play of it. This song’s lyrics were dated even when released, with references to Booth Gardener, who was Washington’s governor in 1992 (but not 1999). Because of that, I debated where it really belonged. In the end, every time I listened to it the groove and energy carried me through enough to slot it here.
I saw your creepy dolls yesterday too!

That Seattle wall was killer
 
Here's a playlist for 29's, I may yet tinker with track order because I am **** *********
There was a playliat at the top of his post.;)
Oh crap, don't mind me then, I am just yanking my own crank as usual :lol:

There are worse ways to burn an hour on a Sunday morning I guess.
I think he will be sending me the songs and I will give the playlist in advance, so it should look like that going forward.
Perfect, sorry, I woke up got all excited and totally missed that
 
Ray Charles' Your Cheatin' Heart is a groundbreaking masterpiece.

From an NPR article:
Charles knew his country music; he'd listened to country radio growing up in Florida, and had already recorded Hank Snow's "I'm Moving On" while at Atlantic. But Modern Sounds is true to its title: It doesn't attempt to copy the originals or use "country" instruments like pedal-steel guitar or fiddles. Charles selected songs he could attack with utter mastery in big, bold, horn-driven arrangements, and his interpretations underscore the durability and power of the songs that he and producer Sid Feller chose to record. ... Ray Charles relishes the wordplay and deep blues in these heartfelt songs, and finds the spot where country and R&B pianos meet.
 
Ray Charles' Your Cheatin' Heart is a groundbreaking masterpiece.

From an NPR article:
Charles knew his country music; he'd listened to country radio growing up in Florida, and had already recorded Hank Snow's "I'm Moving On" while at Atlantic. But Modern Sounds is true to its title: It doesn't attempt to copy the originals or use "country" instruments like pedal-steel guitar or fiddles. Charles selected songs he could attack with utter mastery in big, bold, horn-driven arrangements, and his interpretations underscore the durability and power of the songs that he and producer Sid Feller chose to record. ... Ray Charles relishes the wordplay and deep blues in these heartfelt songs, and finds the spot where country and R&B pianos meet.
Legendary album. Ray was a genius.
 
Here's a playlist for 29's, I may yet tinker with track order because I am **** *********
There was a playliat at the top of his post.;)
Oh crap, don't mind me then, I am just yanking my own crank as usual :lol:

There are worse ways to burn an hour on a Sunday morning I guess.
I think he will be sending me the songs and I will give the playlist in advance, so it should look like that going forward.
Perfect, sorry, I woke up got all excited and totally missed that
No worries, I had to double check as well. Like you said- worse ways to spend time in the morning.
 
The links that I submitted in the Google Form are not the ones making it to the playlists. This has been true for the last two songs. I assume the playlist makers are just hunting down title and album? I had submitted live, later releases of the last 2 Kinks' songs that I intended for people to hear. The one I submitted is showing up in Zegras' posted list, but the Spotify playlists aren't getting made from the same links. I don't think it was a huge difference for Acute Schizophrenia, but I do think Brainwashed is affected more. Just an observation. I appreciate the work you all are doing. I put the intended link into my posts commenting about the songs, but those probably are likely to get lost in the mix.
 
The links that I submitted in the Google Form are not the ones making it to the playlists. This has been true for the last two songs. I assume the playlist makers are just hunting down title and album? I had submitted live, later releases of the last 2 Kinks' songs that I intended for people to hear. The one I submitted is showing up in Zegras' posted list, but the Spotify playlists aren't getting made from the same links. I don't think it was a huge difference for Acute Schizophrenia, but I do think Brainwashed is affected more. Just an observation. I appreciate the work you all are doing. I put the intended link into my posts commenting about the songs, but those probably are likely to get lost in the mix.
This is 100% the case.

Sorry, my assumption was that album cuts were fine for the Spotify list and people were playing a little with YouTube links and such, and the live ones werent on spotify . Bad assumption on my part. I will be doing most of them going forward and am happy to put different versions on the playlist if wanted.
 
#29 - Ray Charles - Your Cheatin' Heart Spotify

Ray was a big fan of country music. He was born in Albany, Ga, but moved to Greenville, Florida, when he was around six months old. He said Greenville was a small poor village. He listened to the radio all the time, and in the daytime country music was played on every dial. He said he loved it. On Saturday nights the Grand Ole Opry would come on, and he said his mom would let him stay up past nine to hear it. He said country music fascinated him. He loved the banjos, fiddles, steel guitars and lyrics. He said the lyrics were like having an every day conversation with someone. His mom died when he was around 14 or 15, and he moved to Jacksonville where her BFF lived. He moved in with her and her husband, and he joined a band that played country music called the Florida Hillbillys.

I just want to mention that while growing up in Greenville, Ray said he would hear jazz on the radio in the night time (unless it was Saturday night). People like Benny Goodman and Count Basie would be on the airwaves live from a hotel or nightclub. He said everybody in Greenville sang the blues, so he heard that in the neighborhood, and he heard gospel in church on Sundays and at revivals. All of that exposure would eventually mix together for him when he played music himself.

Your Cheatin' Heart. Ray decided in 1961 that he wanted to record an album of country and western songs. He was with the ABC label then, and he had a great run with Atlantic prior to that. He had established himself in the music industry at this point, and the President of ABC was concerned when he told him he wanted to do a country album, but he didn't say no. He told Ray that he was a "Rhythm and Blues" singer, and that he could lose a lot of his audience doing a country record. Ray told him that was true, but he could also gain an audience if he did it right. So Ray got the green light to do it.

He was a lyric man, so that was the first thing he looked for in choosing country songs to cover. He loved Hank Williams, and he would end up doing three of Hank's songs on Vol. 1 and 2 of his Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music albums. Both albums were released in 1962. On "Your Cheatin' Heart" which is on Vol.2, Ray changed the chords around and arranged it until it sounded like himself. He did this with all the songs. He took the hillbilly sound out, and gave it an infusion of soul, r&b, a bit of jazz and country, and it sounded magnificent, and he conveyed the words of the writers in a convincing and beautiful way. Ray said that blues and country were close in many ways, which I think is why Ray had such a strong feel for them, and why he expressed them so well while singing. Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music was a huge hit. Both volumes were. To this day it is one of the most successful and important albums in music history.

Willie Nelson said that Ray did more for country music than anyone else. Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music brought Ray's audience to country music, and also brought the country music audience to Ray. There was a particular song on the album that catapulted country music worldwide (it is coming up later on the list), and Willie said that Ray's version of that song is when country music was heard by more people than ever. He also said, "He (Ray) kicked country music forward 50 years. Before him, a lot of people had probably never heard of songs by Don Gibson or Hank Williams." Anyway, I love Ray's version of Hank's "Your Cheatin' Heart."
 
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I think most people know that Ray lost his sight by the time he was 7. They think it was from glaucoma. He started gradually losing it a couple years prior, and he credits his mother for preparing him for it. He said she used to have him practice getting around, because she wanted to make sure he could be independent. She enrolled him in the school for the Deaf and Blind. The first year there he learned to play the clarinet and sax. He wanted to learn the piano, but the class was full. The second year he was able to enter the piano program, and he also kept up with the clarinet and sax. He stayed at the school until his mom died when he was 14 or 15. He said the most tragic thing in his life wasn't losing his sight, it was losing his mom and brother. He said it would have been more shocking losing his sight if he were older and had been able to see for a much longer period of time. Kids adapt much easier to many things.

His real name is Ray Charles Robinson. He dropped Robinson from his name when he started playing music professionally, because he didn't want people to mix him up with the boxer Sugar Ray Robinson.
 
#29 Sigur Ros - Hafssól (Seasun) - Hvarf/Heim - 2007

Ok, time to start the actual rankings part of the list. I figured the first two songs would have a generally positive reaction and that was the case, now at the true end of my rankings I'm curious what kind of response these will get.

Hafssól is actually a song from their debut album, but that album is a bit of an electronic ambient mess. This version, from their concert film is totally different and is what gets played live.
Around this time, the band was playing their live performances with a 4 piece string quartet from Iceland called Amiina. The added depth and orchestration helped produce some of their best live recordings.

This song really tests frontman Jonsi's falsetto voice. I don't know musical terms much but if there's something beyond falsetto, I think he hits it here. I doubt even a swift kick to the balls could get me to hit these notes. Stick with it and you get treated to a symphonic explosion at about 6:45. Maybe my favorite part is at the very end of the song where the flutist keeps going as if so caught up in everything they forget to stop.

Anyway, this sort of song structure where the first part of the song slowly develops into something that ultimately explodes into greatness is very common with Sigur Ros, and I guess post rock in general.


Hafssól
Bakvið skýjaból vaknar sól úr dvala
Svalar sér við kalda dropa regnsins
leikur sér við heita loga eldsins
Býr til regnboga

Sea Sun
Behind a vessel of clouds, a sun wakes up from its lethargy
Refreshes itself with some little raindrops
Plays with the hot flames of the fire
Makes rainbows
 
#29.

No Name 3- Elliott Smith


"Watched the dying day blushing in the sky.
Everyone is uptight. So, come on night."


Elliott Smith wrote 6 untitled songs that are called the No Names songs. four of which appear on the Roman Candle Album. If your a fan of Elliott or the movie Good Will Hunting you might remember that this track plays during the famous "How bout them apples" scene.

What I like most about this track is that it feels both melancholy and comforting at the same time. It is very soothing and one of my favorite to play on guitar,
 
The links that I submitted in the Google Form are not the ones making it to the playlists. This has been true for the last two songs. I assume the playlist makers are just hunting down title and album? I had submitted live, later releases of the last 2 Kinks' songs that I intended for people to hear. The one I submitted is showing up in Zegras' posted list, but the Spotify playlists aren't getting made from the same links. I don't think it was a huge difference for Acute Schizophrenia, but I do think Brainwashed is affected more. Just an observation. I appreciate the work you all are doing. I put the intended link into my posts commenting about the songs, but those probably are likely to get lost in the mix.
I am gonna have to give a heads up to playlist makers when some Ray songs come up that have different versions of them. The versions I picked are the ones i gave Zegras, and I made sure to pick a YouTube and Spotify version that were the same. I PMd KP the other day to let him know that the remastered version that I gave Zegras sounded much better than the one he used, and being the nice feller that he is, he changed it. Ray has some old songs. The main thing is some songs are completely different versions as in they have remakes done in a different style. I think I have 5 on there that are like that. Whatever Zegras post, is the version I chose, but I'll try to get word to the playlist person when it comes up, although I'm not sure who it will be.
 
How about to keep it consistent, I do the playlists and slow down to make sure I add the specific version people included to zegrass?

If people have questions or changes they know who to PM, and if there are versions linked I can't find in Spotify, I can PM that person.

Playlists will improve from here on out!
 
How about to keep it consistent, I do the playlists and slow down to make sure I add the specific version people included to zegrass?

If people have questions or changes they know who to PM, and if there are versions linked I can't find in Spotify, I can PM that person.

Playlists will improve from here on out!
Fyi to all. I'm sending the next list to karmass in advance and will be posting list and playlist in same post from now on. Thanks Plinkoass for helping so far. Just having done fun with zegrass also. Lol.
 
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There are a few of my Chicago selections that are one track on YouTube but divided up into multiple tracks on Spotify. I will advise Zegras and KP beforehand when one of those is coming up.
 
As to the ambient music (Sigur Ros) and electronic music (Daft Punk and deadmau5) I don’t think I’m “sophisticated” enough to see much difference from song to song but enjoying each selection, individually.

I am looking forward to bookmarking those three playlists at the end of this as there are times I can see myself throwing it on when I want to relax or feel like I’m walking through a video game. I can do that with a random playlist now but I like these are coming from fans.
 
Here's a playlist for 29's, I may yet tinker with track order because I am **** *********
Please don't as I'm halfway through it.
TIA
I thought most people were shuffling anyway

I like to try to find a flow, that is fun to me, but I won’t be offended if folks prefer I just set it in Zegras’ order the times I do it
Fyi. The playlist was posted with all thr 29s. In the same post.
As always, just a little slow on the uptake here

Thanks again for all your hard work gb..
 
New Orleans is Sinking - The Tragically Hip. I wonder if I’ve heard this before. Probably somewhere, but I can’t be sure. Regardless, I definitely enjoyed this song. So far, this group’s left a pretty strong impression!

Verdis Quo - Daft Punk. Coming into this, I could name, oh, maybe 5 Daft Punk songs. Definitely a learning experience. Randomness brought me here, but I think this is also the one (of three) that I’ve connected to the most.

Riff Raff - AC/DC. Admittedly, Powerage is in a blind spot for me, so I didn’t really remember this one. It’s got that blues rock feel that you expect from this group. As someone who also posted a deep(er) cut today, I’ve gotta appreciate it!

Under the Westway - Blur (/Damian Alborn). Instantly light and dreamy. You can definitely hear influences from other artists, but also how this might have influenced future songs. It’ll be intriguing hearing things beyond the song or two they’re famous for.

Ghost of a Chance - Rush. Another deeper cut. Roll the Bones (either the album or the song) isn’t going to get much love, but I’ve enjoyed this song. Then again, I’m someone who didn’t find a lasting love until my late 30s, so it’s speaking to the choir here.

Rift - Phish. This band probably carries more labels than they know what to do with. Still, this song felt familiar in a progressive sense, complete with letting one or two of the instruments shine for parts of the song. Putting this on my list for a re-listen.

I’ll try to throw out some more <3 to both well-known songs and new discoveries from the 29s. But this will have to do for now.
 
Ghost of a Chance - Rush. Another deeper cut. Roll the Bones (either the album or the song) isn’t going to get much love, but I’ve enjoyed this song. Then again, I’m someone who didn’t find a lasting love until my late 30s, so it’s speaking to the choir here.
I’m not a big post-Signals fan, but this is probably top 3 for me of that era.
 
New Orleans is sinking is fantastic. Surprised it came this low as I think of it as a marquee song of theirs but I also don’t know if the intended order for The Tragically Hip is ranked or something else. Either way, a great song.
 
Foo FightersJust Win BabyLet It Die

This is the first of 3 songs in my top 31 from the album Echoes, Silence, Patience & Grace, which won the Grammy for Best Rock Album and was also nominated for Album of the Year. This song made it to #1 on the US Alternative Rock chart and peaked at #5 on the US Mainstream Rock chart.

I love the slow build of the song. The previous album, In Your Honor, was a double album, with one disc of 10 rock songs and a second disc of 10 acoustic songs. As noted by Consequence of Sound:

Before recording Echoes, Silence, Patience & Grace, Dave Grohl revealed that the band wanted to squeeze the tonal variances on In Your Honor — a double album — into a single disc. With “Let It Die,” they squeeze it into a single song. The end result is one of the Foos’ better exercises in soft-loud dynamics.

Here is a quote from Grohl about the song:

"It's a song that's written about feeling helpless to someone else's demise. I've seen people lose it all to drugs and heartbreak and death. It's happened more than once in my life, but the one that's most noted is Kurt. And there are a lot of people that I've been angry with in my life, but the one that's most noted is Courtney. So it's pretty obvious to me that those correlations are gonna pop up every now and again."

He doesn't specifically say that the song is about Kurt and/or Courtney, and many have speculated that it was about Taylor Hawkins, who had a long battle with heroin addiction and actually spent two weeks in a coma after an overdose while the Foos were touring in 2001. Given that, I seriously doubt they will ever play the song again in concert.
 
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Riff Raff - AC/DC. Admittedly, Powerage is in a blind spot for me, so I didn’t really remember this one. It’s got that blues rock feel that you expect from this group. As someone who also posted a deep(er) cut today, I’ve gotta appreciate it!
I see the playlist has the album version. I prefer the Live version and had submitted it with my list to Zegras. As a concert opener I think it kicks ***. :headbang:
 

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