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The movie experience has to change (1 Viewer)

Society always messes this up.

I loved the movie theater with no parents from 6th-8th grade. Always packed with kids and sneaking into R rated movies etc.

Older people would tell stories of how great drive ins were.
 
Regal has
This theater is 4 miles from my home. The Regal that is less than 2 miles wants $19 a ticket everyday regardless of the time.
Regal has a movie pass, $21.99 a month, unlimited movies. Can cancel after 3 months or 1 month, I need to read the fine print. 2 movies a month make it worthwhile. I've heard that MoviePass is making a comeback.

Recently, I've seen Glass Onion, Triangle of Sadness, Knock at the Cabin, and a couple of others. The first 2 were good. I plan to buy a pass for the next couple of months. The Regal in Miami Beach is usually more than half empty. No problem with cell phones or noise. I also saw a movie in LA last Thanksgiving, it was fairly crowded, but no issues with the audience.
You know that’s not a bad deal at all if you plan on going to at least 3-4 movies minimum. But like I said we are highly selective about what we choose to see on the silver screen.

Maybe once we send my son off to college this August we will be going to a lot more movies lol.
 
Society always messes this up.

I loved the movie theater with no parents from 6th-8th grade. Always packed with kids and sneaking into R rated movies etc.

Older people would tell stories of how great drive ins were.
Some of this is just nostalgia for the past. I'm sure drive-ins were fun, and I enjoyed theaters too, but streaming is so, so much better. It's weird now to think about checking the newspaper (!) to see what time a certain movie was playing and having to plan your day around being in that one particular place at that one particular time. And if you missed it, you weren't seeing that movie ever unless you happened to catch it on network television. And then it was heavily edited and cropped. That sucks. It's infinitely better now.

Having said that, we never did come up with a way to replicate the "kids getting into trouble in a safe and socially-acceptable way" like sneaking in to see Porkys. Stuff like that was a good opportunity to bond with our friends and also experience the world as little mini-adults. Kids need to develop some independence from their parents and build strong social ties. That was a load-bearing wall that we knocked down several decades ago.
 
Seems like there needs to be an evolution in the movie seeing experience - lots of movies failing at the box office. Maybe some type of subscription model where you get one viewing at home. Any ideas.

and I still want my butter drenched popcorn

I don't think it's the actual experience; what with theatres having reclining seats/alcohol/assigned seating/stadium seating and more concession options. Most theatres I know also have 5.00 Tuesdays....for all their movies; regardless of how long the theatre has been out.

We went to see the new Indiana Jones. The audience overwhelmingly trended older. I'm 49 and was one of (what appeared to be) younger people. I'd imagine there's quite a few retirees filling up the theatres on Tuesdays. What I do think is that there's an entire generation of people who, except for maybe kids movies (and that's only for something to do with their kids) see no reason to go.

Maybe the theatres should be able to flex their schedule more and not fill up all of their auditoriums with the new releases?
 
Society always messes this up.

I loved the movie theater with no parents from 6th-8th grade. Always packed with kids and sneaking into R rated movies etc.

Older people would tell stories of how great drive ins were.
Some of this is just nostalgia for the past. I'm sure drive-ins were fun, and I enjoyed theaters too, but streaming is so, so much better. It's weird now to think about checking the newspaper (!) to see what time a certain movie was playing and having to plan your day around being in that one particular place at that one particular time. And if you missed it, you weren't seeing that movie ever unless you happened to catch it on network television. And then it was heavily edited and cropped. That sucks. It's infinitely better now.

Having said that, we never did come up with a way to replicate the "kids getting into trouble in a safe and socially-acceptable way" like sneaking in to see Porkys. Stuff like that was a good opportunity to bond with our friends and also experience the world as little mini-adults. Kids need to develop some independence from their parents and build strong social ties. That was a load-bearing wall that we knocked down several decades ago.
Kind of it’s own thread but yeah parents are totally to blame for that. The world is far safer than it was 30-60 years ago and yet parents are far more protective and allow kids much less freedom.
 
For those looking for a subscription model, MoviePass is back. Its obviously not as good - but I pay $10 per month for 2-3 movies.
 
For me the reserved seating (allowing you to stroll in when the movie is starting instead of having to get there 30 minutes early so you don’t end up in the front row) and the much larger reclining seats, coupled with the ability to purchase alcohol has vastly improved the theater experience for me.

Sure, but at what cost. Each of those conveniences/enhancements comes with an additional cost.

It is a few bucks more expensive per ticket and then you have to tip the waiter, but it is worth every penny. Just press a button and they bring me a new beer during the movie.
 
My house has more comfortable seats, a screen nearly as sharp and bright, and I can pause to go to the bathroom or rewind to hear missed dialog. What benefit does the theater have? Shoehorned in next to strangers is a plus??
I highly doubt your home set up is anywhere near the size and quality of the audio-visuals at a move theater.
It's gotta be a lot closer now. 4k with even a decent sound bar is way closer than 480p and some Klipsch horns in the 90s.
 
I cant believe people in this thread are saying there are less distractions in a theater compared to a home theater.

I'll take the home theater any day. Sure it's not quite the same experience, but the technology has made it close enough that the positives outweigh the negatives for me. I can watch a blockbuster movie in surround, OLED while sprawled out on the comfortable sofa in my underwear. That's the movie going experience I want. I can pause whenever there are boobs interesting things on the screen, and rewind for anything I missed. There is nobody giggling/talking/chewing on popcorn loudly right behind me.
 
I cant believe people in this thread are saying there are less distractions in a theater compared to a home theater.

I'll take the home theater any day. Sure it's not quite the same experience, but the technology has made it close enough that the positives outweigh the negatives for me. I can watch a blockbuster movie in surround, OLED while sprawled out on the comfortable sofa in my underwear. That's the movie going experience I want. I can pause whenever there are boobs interesting things on the screen, and rewind for anything I missed. There is nobody giggling/talking/chewing on popcorn loudly right behind me.
i have a 11 speakers and a 110" screen...... i'm quite satisficed with the home viewing experience
 
I still like the theater experience but pretty much reserved for big releases. I think Avatar 2 was the last one we saw (well we did go to the drive in to see the new Elemental movie and little mermaid)
 
I’ll echo the ridiculous prices, and the limited number of movies that truly interest me at those prices, as the main deterrents. Plus it used to be that you had to wait a long time to see them outside the theaters, but that’s all obviously changed.
 
I’ll echo the ridiculous prices, and the limited number of movies that truly interest me at those prices, as the main deterrents. Plus it used to be that you had to wait a long time to see them outside the theaters, but that’s all obviously changed.
We went yesterday. It was two of us. Got a free drink. Only got popcorn, still cost me about 50
 
Most annoying thing I see is every movie there’s always somebody in the wrong seat. Today……two couples were in the wrong seats. More comical than annoying and it’s before the movie even starts but still………is it that difficult to notice the huge letter on the floor next to each row and then the number directly on the seat?
Wait, they have assigned seats at movies now? I guess I haven't been to an actual theater in so long they actually changed the format.
 
Most annoying thing I see is every movie there’s always somebody in the wrong seat. Today……two couples were in the wrong seats. More comical than annoying and it’s before the movie even starts but still………is it that difficult to notice the huge letter on the floor next to each row and then the number directly on the seat?
Wait, they have assigned seats at movies now? I guess I haven't been to an actual theater in so long they actually changed the format.
Most do, yeah. Not so much assigned but you choose when you pay for them.
 
Wait, they have assigned seats at movies now? I guess I haven't been to an actual theater in so long they actually changed the format.
Locally: in 2017, the regular ol' AMC theaters (not premium or new theaters) ripped out their old seats and installed stadium-seating recliners. Part of this move was also drastically reducing the number of patrons any one theater could hold. Used to be around 150-250. Now they range from about 50 to maybe 100.

When people talk about crowded theaters today, or being able to count on hearing talking, chewing, and phones during the show ... I know they are talking about a completely different kind of experience than what we now have here. Even when one of the new recliner theaters is full up ... you still feel isolated. The person closest to me other than my wife** ... they're not even within arm's reach the way our recliner theaters are laid out now. And the people immediately in front and back feel like how people three rows away felt in the old-style theaters.


** the recliners are essentially paired. I think there are a few trios and singles scattered about.
 
I have always enjoyed going to the theater to see movies. But, the cost has made it so that it has to be a big draw for me to go.
I really enjoy the reserve your seat and the more comfortable seating.
The biggest drawbacks are personal things. I watch most of my TV with CC on, I just have a hard time with the loudness of current movies, I can't always follow what is being said. I know that is something I can't get in a theater.

But if you really want me to come to watch a 3+ hour movie, bring back intermissions!
You want to sell me popcorn and a big drink, ok. I am going to have to go to the bathroom. Give me an intermission.

The last move I think I may have seen was a Marvel one. I called my nephew that had already seen it, and asked for a clue as to the best spot to make a bathroom run. He told me where there would be a lull in important content.
 
I cant believe people in this thread are saying there are less distractions in a theater compared to a home theater.

I'll take the home theater any day. Sure it's not quite the same experience, but the technology has made it close enough that the positives outweigh the negatives for me. I can watch a blockbuster movie in surround, OLED while sprawled out on the comfortable sofa in my underwear. That's the movie going experience I want. I can pause whenever there are boobs interesting things on the screen, and rewind for anything I missed. There is nobody giggling/talking/chewing on popcorn loudly right behind me.
"Sit still and shush" can be more easily attainable at a movie theater.
At home, there's been times the kids were totally into it and times where I about spent the time of the movie telling them to get off their phones or somesuch.
At five they can't sit still. At 15 I'm reminded of my dad yelling at me for going in and out the door fifty times a day.
It's gotta be a parent's gut call on this
 
My house has more comfortable seats, a screen nearly as sharp and bright, and I can pause to go to the bathroom or rewind to hear missed dialog. What benefit does the theater have? Shoehorned in next to strangers is a plus??
I highly doubt your home set up is anywhere near the size and quality of the audio-visuals at a move theater.
It's gotta be a lot closer now. 4k with even a decent sound bar is way closer than 480p and some Klipsch horns in the 90s.
No doubt about it
 
Confluence of factors is killing them. Obviously streaming combined with cheaper and better/bigger tv’s home theater experiences hurt demand to go to a theater greatly. Streaming also killed dvd sales which had financed the explosion in so many good and different films in the pipeline during the 90’s & 00’s and hurt the end product selection to where so much is just blockbusters and franchises now. They killed the delayed distribution model during covid sending movies to streaming too soon now so people can just wait a month and a half to watch to save $. Admission Prices got way too high although the movie experience is better than ever with recliners, picking seats, smaller #’s of seats per theater, food and alcohol. The people bitching about bad experiences or rude patrons probably haven’t actually been much the last 5 or 10 years.

Although Streaming is hitting the skids and experiencing diminishing returns quickly so will be interesting to see what happens. Nearly all the streaming platforms are making major changes and trying to figure out a new working model that is profitable. Overbuilt areas like suburbs around me are closing theaters left and right to deal with the reduced demand. Entertainment is more fractured than ever with social media, youtube/tiktok, reality, cable, streaming, etc.
 
Last movie we went to was in our area's new theater and is high end with reclining seats, etc. Place was a disaster. Short staffed, barely any concessions, and the seats looked all torn up. It seemed they stopped caring coming out of the pandemic.

I like taking the kids to the drive-in occasionally, but the sound isn't that great for my old man ears.
 
We go to the movies a couple times a month--usually horror or the big name titles.

I am a snob when it comes to movies in that I will only pay to see them in XD/big screen formats Once a movie is only available in standard showings, I am willing to wait the 3 months for VOD. I am retiring here in a month and I have looked at the Moviepass type offers that are out there, but they are usually only tickets to older or SD showings, so I am not interested. Also I enjoy my home theater a lot, so I can be patient.

They are expensive. This last weekend for Indiana Jones was probably $80 all things considered for my daughter, wife and I. Multiple that by 2x if you have a couple extra kids and that becomes quite the expensive outing for a young family. The other critique is the length of previews and commercials prior to the movie starting. Indiana Jones was already 2 hours and twenty minutes and then there was at least 20 minutes of stuff before it. I was half way through my drink at this point. Prior to Covid, you could buy the large drink and get free refills, but that is a thing of the past.

Finally, movie studios are going to have to rethink what they are putting out. Disney re-imagining every character and feeling the need to include agendas in every one of their recent releases, families are not going to show up and spend that kind of money just to be lectured. Elemental (the latest flop ) reflects this. Also the days of having Pixar in the title doesn't guarantee a hit--see the new Ruby Gillman--Teenage Kraken move that just bombed this weekend. The latest Spiderman movie being the exception, people are also growing tired of Marvel/DC movies. We have movies for practically every minor superhero at this point.
 
Wait, they have assigned seats at movies now? I guess I haven't been to an actual theater in so long they actually changed the format.
Locally: in 2017, the regular ol' AMC theaters (not premium or new theaters) ripped out their old seats and installed stadium-seating recliners. Part of this move was also drastically reducing the number of patrons any one theater could hold. Used to be around 150-250. Now they range from about 50 to maybe 100.

When people talk about crowded theaters today, or being able to count on hearing talking, chewing, and phones during the show ... I know they are talking about a completely different kind of experience than what we now have here. Even when one of the new recliner theaters is full up ... you still feel isolated. The person closest to me other than my wife** ... they're not even within arm's reach the way our recliner theaters are laid out now. And the people immediately in front and back feel like how people three rows away felt in the old-style theaters.


** the recliners are essentially paired. I think there are a few trios and singles scattered about.
unless the guy next to you takes a nap in his recliner
 
I think streaming services are only struggling because they were at a fortunate time where they could try things and some of those ideas didn't work out. Their base business model is as secure as could be and an easy shift to go back to being quite profitable.

There may be some smaller brands that can't handle it but none of the big dogs should be concerned here.
 
I am sure I am in the minority here but for the most part I think the movie theater cranks the sound up way too high and it can become a bit much especially in action movies. It's just too loud.

I don't mind it being loud but most of the time it's just too much.


Don't you have a lawn to watch so you can yell at any kids that might be on it?
 
I am sure I am in the minority here but for the most part I think the movie theater cranks the sound up way too high and it can become a bit much especially in action movies. It's just too loud.

I don't mind it being loud but most of the time it's just too much.


Don't you have a lawn to watch so you can yell at any kids that might be on it?


Says the guy who needs closed captioning at his house.
 
I think streaming services are only struggling because they were at a fortunate time where they could try things and some of those ideas didn't work out. Their base business model is as secure as could be and an easy shift to go back to being quite profitable.

There may be some smaller brands that can't handle it but none of the big dogs should be concerned here.
The total reported streaming losses for Disney/Hulu , Discovery/HBO/Max, Peacock and Paramount is something like $20 billion since the pandemic. Netflix has been in a panic for about a year now as they have seen for the first time ever a decline in subscribers.
 
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I think streaming services are only struggling because they were at a fortunate time where they could try things and some of those ideas didn't work out. Their base business model is as secure as could be and an easy shift to go back to being quite profitable.

There may be some smaller brands that can't handle it but none of the big dogs should be concerned here.
The total reported streaming losses for Disney/Hulu , Discovery/HBO/Max, Peacock and Paramount is something like $20 billion since the pandemic. Netflix has been in a panic for about a year now as they have seen for the first time ever a decline in subscribers.

Can't speak to the others stuff, but I don't think Netflix subscriber loss meant much. Kind of to be expected after a huge outlier number of sign-ups, many temporary, while people were stuck at home. They pretty much bounced right back. In fact 2 quarters after that loss they posted I believe their 4th largest subscriber growth ever in a quarter, trailing only three from the heart of the pandemic.
 
It's almost a perfect storm killing the movie theater experience.
1. High def TV and a near infinite of on demand streaming programming
2. COVID lockdowns got people used to/preferring to stay home
3. A dearth of good product

I still enjoy going to the movies, especially when the movie really pops on the big screen / stellar sound system.
All I need is something worth seeing ...
 
I'm still a big fan of going to the movies, certain films are just better with a large screen and a crowd. Watched Creed III at home this weekend and wished I had seen it at the theater.

Captain America wielding Thor's hammer in Avengers:Endgame, the boulder chasing Indiana Jones in Raiders of the Lost Ark, Roy Hobbs hitting the homer in The Natural, the store owner and his wife helping their new employee in Debbie Does Dallas - all of these magical moments would not have been the same without a big screen and cheering audience sharing the experience with you.
 
I think streaming services are only struggling because they were at a fortunate time where they could try things and some of those ideas didn't work out. Their base business model is as secure as could be and an easy shift to go back to being quite profitable.

There may be some smaller brands that can't handle it but none of the big dogs should be concerned here.
The total reported streaming losses for Disney/Hulu , Discovery/HBO/Max, Peacock and Paramount is something like $20 billion since the pandemic. Netflix has been in a panic for about a year now as they have seen for the first time ever a decline in subscribers.

Can't speak to the others stuff, but I don't think Netflix subscriber loss meant much. Kind of to be expected after a huge outlier number of sign-ups, many temporary, while people were stuck at home. They pretty much bounced right back. In fact 2 quarters after that loss they posted I believe their 4th largest subscriber growth ever in a quarter, trailing only three from the heart of the pandemic.

Netflix juiced their numbers by cracking down on shared logins. Thats unlikely to help them longterm growth-wise and alienated a lot of now former customers too. All the other streamers treat their channels either as loss leaders (like Apple or D+) and/or are cutting back massively on content production or selling things off in an effort to get profitable (WB & Paramount). Streaming is here to stay but it’s definitely about to change and/or likely consolidate down the number of options.
 
The total reported streaming losses for Disney/Hulu , Discovery/HBO/Max, Peacock and Paramount is something like $20 billion since the pandemic.
This doesn't make intuitive sense unless this is from sheer overspending when creating new content.
 
I think streaming services are only struggling because they were at a fortunate time where they could try things and some of those ideas didn't work out. Their base business model is as secure as could be and an easy shift to go back to being quite profitable.

There may be some smaller brands that can't handle it but none of the big dogs should be concerned here.
The total reported streaming losses for Disney/Hulu , Discovery/HBO/Max, Peacock and Paramount is something like $20 billion since the pandemic. Netflix has been in a panic for about a year now as they have seen for the first time ever a decline in subscribers.

Can't speak to the others stuff, but I don't think Netflix subscriber loss meant much. Kind of to be expected after a huge outlier number of sign-ups, many temporary, while people were stuck at home. They pretty much bounced right back. In fact 2 quarters after that loss they posted I believe their 4th largest subscriber growth ever in a quarter, trailing only three from the heart of the pandemic.

Netflix juiced their numbers by cracking down on shared logins. Thats unlikely to help them longterm growth-wise and alienated a lot of now former customers too. All the other streamers treat their channels either as loss leaders (like Apple or D+) and/or are cutting back massively on content production or selling things off in an effort to get profitable (WB & Paramount). Streaming is here to stay but it’s definitely about to change and/or likely consolidate down the number of options.
Yeah I think several of them at this point hope to just be bought out or will sell parts for money. It’s all just going to end up back where it started with a model similar to cable.
 
What is the best movie out right now that's in theaters?
Probably either Asteroid City or Past Lives. Most fun movie? Spider-Man: Across the Spider-Verse
People seemed to like Guardians 3 and Super Mario, those are still out. Is The Flash good? Depends who you ask. Kids probably like Elemental or Little Mermaid.

Past Lives and Across the Spiderverse are probably the objective best movies. Both will be in the Best Picture convo.
 
I think streaming services are only struggling because they were at a fortunate time where they could try things and some of those ideas didn't work out. Their base business model is as secure as could be and an easy shift to go back to being quite profitable.

There may be some smaller brands that can't handle it but none of the big dogs should be concerned here.
The total reported streaming losses for Disney/Hulu , Discovery/HBO/Max, Peacock and Paramount is something like $20 billion since the pandemic. Netflix has been in a panic for about a year now as they have seen for the first time ever a decline in subscribers.

Can't speak to the others stuff, but I don't think Netflix subscriber loss meant much. Kind of to be expected after a huge outlier number of sign-ups, many temporary, while people were stuck at home. They pretty much bounced right back. In fact 2 quarters after that loss they posted I believe their 4th largest subscriber growth ever in a quarter, trailing only three from the heart of the pandemic.

Netflix juiced their numbers by cracking down on shared logins. Thats unlikely to help them longterm growth-wise and alienated a lot of now former customers too. All the other streamers treat their channels either as loss leaders (like Apple or D+) and/or are cutting back massively on content production or selling things off in an effort to get profitable (WB & Paramount). Streaming is here to stay but it’s definitely about to change and/or likely consolidate down the number of options.

The shared logins thing was just implemented a few weeks ago, correct? That doesn't affect their numbers from two quarters ago in terms of new subscriber count, which were very good. If anything it probably HURT their numbers during that very good quarter because they had announced it at that point (which led to some people canceling out of anger) but they hadn't actually implemented it yet and seen any of its benefits in the numbers.

If anything, the sharing crackdown went WAY smoother than anyone anticipated which is probably a good thing for them because most people were expecting a much bigger pushback on that.

Regardless, the "declining subscribers" nonsense was mostly spin. They got a huge outlier number of new subscribers that only intended to stay temporarily due to a global pandemic that forced everyone to stay inside for a year. The fact that they ended up retaining the vast majority but not all of those temporary subscribers and convert most of them into long-term customers somehow being spun into being a bad thing is interesting.

Like all things but especially these streaming businesses they'll all hit a point of diminishing returns on new subscriber sign-ups eventually (how many people do you know that don't already have Netflix) and they'll have to keep increasing revenue by increasing margins. But that's just capitalism and it's not unique to streaming. It's the same reason you have to pay for reach on Facebook now, the same reason bowling costs 4x as much now despite there being half as many workers there to run the place, the same reason a pizza costs 2x as much as it used to despite using mass produced cheap cheese instead of the good local stuff now, etc.

Price will go up, product quality will go down pretty consistently on everything until we get another big recession where customer retention becomes important again.
 
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Like all things but especially these streaming businesses they'll all hit a point of diminishing returns on new subscriber sign-ups eventually (how many people do you know that don't already have Netflix) and they'll have to keep increasing revenue by increasing margins.
Yeah, I think Netflix could make half as many TV shows as they are, and no one would notice.
 
I watch most of my TV with CC on, I just have a hard time with the loudness of current movies, I can't always follow what is being said. I know that is something I can't get in a theater.
Last time I was in the theater, I noticed someone that had a portable teleprompter thing that provided closed captioning. It plugged into the armrest with a arm on it so you could adjust it to whatever position you want. I think you just have to request when buying the ticket, or possibly just when entering the theater. I imagine not all theaters provide this feature but it seemed pretty neat.
 
Films like Oppenheimer will occasionally attract me into theatres but not much else. The experience has become much too expensive for the average family, particularly concessions.
 
I think streaming services are only struggling because they were at a fortunate time where they could try things and some of those ideas didn't work out. Their base business model is as secure as could be and an easy shift to go back to being quite profitable.

There may be some smaller brands that can't handle it but none of the big dogs should be concerned here.
The total reported streaming losses for Disney/Hulu , Discovery/HBO/Max, Peacock and Paramount is something like $20 billion since the pandemic. Netflix has been in a panic for about a year now as they have seen for the first time ever a decline in subscribers.
That sounds high n all but they went into the "we're movie makers" business and everytime I see the cost of a movie it's an absurd amount.
Any idea what they made on just their streaming services?
If they spend 50 bil on an Adam Sandler movie that never makes the theater...I'm not sure they should be in that business.

The market is pretty saturated and they're the endpoint not the beginning(theater). How many new subscribers can Netflix even gain?
 
I think streaming services are only struggling because they were at a fortunate time where they could try things and some of those ideas didn't work out. Their base business model is as secure as could be and an easy shift to go back to being quite profitable.

There may be some smaller brands that can't handle it but none of the big dogs should be concerned here.
The total reported streaming losses for Disney/Hulu , Discovery/HBO/Max, Peacock and Paramount is something like $20 billion since the pandemic. Netflix has been in a panic for about a year now as they have seen for the first time ever a decline in subscribers.
That sounds high n all but they went into the "we're movie makers" business and everytime I see the cost of a movie it's an absurd amount.
Any idea what they made on just their streaming services?
If they spend 50 bil on an Adam Sandler movie that never makes the theater...I'm not sure they should be in that business.

The market is pretty saturated and they're the endpoint not the beginning(theater). How many new subscribers can Netflix even gain?
That was reported on a website, can’t remember which one and it was the losses they report for streaming. I mean Prime (which is its own beast) spend a billion on a terrible LOTR series hardly anyone watched. These people are crazy how they spend.
 
If they spend 50 bil on an Adam Sandler movie that never makes the theater
Sandler's movies (and more movies of that type) should be pretty cheap to make and I believe they rate very well for Netflix (FWIW). Not sure if the monetization works out right, but just looking at surface info ... I'd think Netflix would want to bankroll as many Sandler films as he can crank out.
 
I mean Prime (which is its own beast) spend a billion on a terrible LOTR series hardly anyone watched.
Wait ... what?

Is that strictly movie-making budget -- like they basically made 3 to 5 Marvel tentpoles, and spent like it? Or was that also rights, marketing (which should be cheap for a streaming service -- are you paying yourself for on-service ads?), etc.

(My wife and I enjoyed that series, for what that's worth. Even liked the recent Willow series. I guess we're easy)

EDIT:

"Amazon said the season was the most-watched of any Prime Video original series ..."

Maybe that's like "the tallest Smurf" -- I don't know.
 

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