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The Question No One is Asking (1 Viewer)

How can an organization with supposedly one of the best front offices in the business, sign him to a $41M contract?

I can understand them taking him in the 4th round in the NFL Draft. Most scouts graded him as a 2nd-round talent with off-field concerns.

But this is the Patriots. They never pay people their worth. They usually have 10 back up strategies on speed dial should their veteran not resign for cheap.

How in the world did this organization NOT uncover that Hernandez was still living the life of a criminal?
Speak for yourself.

:coffee:

Drafting players is always risk/reward. There is a reason Hernandez dropped to the 4th round. NFL teams (and really all businesses) will always weigh the various risks v. rewards, and I doubt they ever eliminate all players of a certain risk level regardless of the talent level.

If anything, the Patriots failed when the re-signed Hernandez, not when they drafted him.
 
How can an organization with supposedly one of the best front offices in the business, sign him to a $41M contract?

I can understand them taking him in the 4th round in the NFL Draft. Most scouts graded him as a 2nd-round talent with off-field concerns.

But this is the Patriots. They never pay people their worth. They usually have 10 back up strategies on speed dial should their veteran not resign for cheap.

How in the world did this organization NOT uncover that Hernandez was still living the life of a criminal?
A common perception expressed many times is that good teams don't make mistakes and that bad teams don't make good moves but the reality is it happens more often than people realize.


At the time the Pats drafted Hernandez the perception was that Belichick did it again. I don't feel people now will do a 180 but maybe they will wait before passing judgement.

================================

A man named Sei Weng owned a beautiful mare which was praised far and wide. One day this beautiful horse disappeared. The people of his village offered sympathy to Sei Weng for his great misfortune. Sei Weng said simply, "That's the way it is."

A few days later the lost mare returned, followed by a beautiful wild stallion. The village congratulated Sei Weng for his good fortune. He said, "That's the way it is."

Some time later, Sei Weng's only son, while riding the stallion, fell off and broke his leg. The village people once again expressed their sympathy at Sei Weng's misfortune. Sei Weng again said, "That's the way it is."

Soon thereafter, war broke out and all the young men of the village except Sei Weng's lame son were drafted and were killed in battle. The village people were amazed as Sei Weng's good luck. His son was the only young man left alive in the village. But Sei Weng kept his same attitude: despite all the turmoil, gains and losses, he gave the same reply, "That's the way it is."

 
It's part arrogance, part desperation. It's very difficult for a great team to stay on top in today's NFL. You're drafting near the end of every round, every year. You're losing good players to the salary cap. You're losing good coaches and front office personell to other teams. On top of that, you're maybe not drafting as well as you should.

So you take shortcuts. Guys with big character red flags come at discounted prices. You have success with guys like Randy Moss. The media applauds your every "no risk" move like trading for Haynesworth and OchoCinco. Even if it doesn't work out, it really won't cost them anything, they say. "Classic Patriots. They're just smarter than everyone else. That lockerroom will keep him in line."

They played with fire once too often, and this time they got burned.

 
I think this issue will be the most difficult one BB and the organization has faced...it's very obvious that Hernandez is a bad guy and has been one for awhile...drafting him is one thing...teams roll the dice on "character issues" all the time...it's just a fact of life in pro sports today...the contract extension is a totally different issue...right now it appears only two things could have occurred...one, the Pats security/intelligence (or whatever you want to call it) totally whiffed on the gravity of Hernandez's thuggishness...for a team that dots every I and crosses every T I find that really hard to believe...so does that mean that the Pats were willing to give out big money to a guy that appears to have gang ties and has a lot of bad stuff going on around him...if he's out in Boston hanging with hoods there is absolutely no way the Pats would not know about this...Boston/Eastern Mass is a very close-knit community and these secrets are not easy to keep...especially on a very high profile player...BB likes to keep the media at bay and that strategy often makes a lot of sense regardless of how frustrating it can be...yet, there is absolutely no way that "no comments" or podium shrugs will suffice here...as a fan I want to know how you can let a good soldier like Welker walk for low money (or bench him for foot jokes) yet can give a big contract to what right now appears to be a murderer who was keeping company with some very, very bad people...sorry but Hernandez just did not turn into a bad guy 10 days ago and the Pats need to answer why they did not have better info or why they ignored the info they had...
Is it possible they didn't know Aaron's wherabout's every second of the day? Yes, it is. Maybe they just treated him like an adult.

They're are hundreds of guys in the NFL with 'character' concerns. Some of them get big contracts. How in the hell were the Patriots supposed to know this paticular knuckle-head would allegedly murder somebody?
Maybe you are not keeping up on the info that is coming out...this is not a good person and hasn't been for awhile...we're not talking about DUI's or strip-club nonsense...we're talking about legit gang-ties...not saying they should know he was going to kill someone...that's being a Monday morning QB...I am saying that this appears to be a guy that you don't give 40 mil to after you have had under your watch for 2+ years...
and you're saying it after he murders somebody, when I guarantee a few months ago you thought it was a steal for the pats.

list up here all other players in the nfl who hang with seedy riffraff and gang members -- or are you just going to wait for them to murder somebody and it gets blasted all over the news?
Who do you think should have more information about the behavior of Hernandez - the Pats organization, or FBG's poster Boston?

 
I think it's foolish for anyone to criticize the draft pick. The contract extension is the questionable move.
Agreed. Given the story about his altercation with Welker and what Matt Light said, it has to be a given that many in the Patriots locker room didn't like his attitude, and that is something an organization has to have a grip on. I am sure if there is a way, we can blame this on Josh McDaniels. :lol:

 
I think it's foolish for anyone to criticize the draft pick. The contract extension is the questionable move.
Agreed. Given the story about his altercation with Welker and what Matt Light said, it has to be a given that many in the Patriots locker room didn't like his attitude, and that is something an organization has to have a grip on. I am sure if there is a way, we can blame this on Josh McDaniels. :lol:
This is really the point Dodds was making and I agree. It was not about drafting him, that was a calculated risk that turned out "golden". But the contract extension is the issue. All of you complaining about the monday morning QB/ 20-20 hindsight crowd have to explain why in this $42 Million dollar extension NE did not put the normal (at least as I understand it) language to guard against paying "signing bonuses" or "guaranteed money" for acts like these. The Pats knew he still hung around a bad crowd. This is really at the core of the question Dodds is asking and I don't think it is an unfair criticism.

 
How can an organization with supposedly one of the best front offices in the business, sign him to a $41M contract?

I can understand them taking him in the 4th round in the NFL Draft. Most scouts graded him as a 2nd-round talent with off-field concerns.

But this is the Patriots. They never pay people their worth. They usually have 10 back up strategies on speed dial should their veteran not resign for cheap.

How in the world did this organization NOT uncover that Hernandez was still living the life of a criminal?
Because they knew his shady behavior would catch up with him and they'd never have to pay it?

 
I think it's foolish for anyone to criticize the draft pick. The contract extension is the questionable move.
Agreed. Given the story about his altercation with Welker and what Matt Light said, it has to be a given that many in the Patriots locker room didn't like his attitude, and that is something an organization has to have a grip on. I am sure if there is a way, we can blame this on Josh McDaniels. :lol:
This is really the point Dodds was making and I agree. It was not about drafting him, that was a calculated risk that turned out "golden". But the contract extension is the issue. All of you complaining about the monday morning QB/ 20-20 hindsight crowd have to explain why in this $42 Million dollar extension NE did not put the normal (at least as I understand it) language to guard against paying "signing bonuses" or "guaranteed money" for acts like these. The Pats knew he still hung around a bad crowd. This is really at the core of the question Dodds is asking and I don't think it is an unfair criticism.
I still think that the Pats at some point will argue (once this dies down some) that Hernandez broke the code of conduct provisions in the CBA BEFORE they released him and that therefore AH himself voided his contract. I certainly am neither an attorney nor a CBA expert, but I believe in the last version of the CBA they started transferring some rudimentary language from player contracts into the general CBA. Maybe that will gain traction, maybe it won't, but I suspect that the Pats are going to argue that.

So while the media is reporting that the Pats were stupid for cutting AH before he got suspended by the league, the Pats case will hinge on AH breaking the league's code of conduct policies BEFORE they released him.

As far as other unique examples, Sean Taylor died . . . but didn't break the conduct policies of the NFL. Vick DID break those rules . . . but I believe they were ratcheted up in the latest CBA but may not have been written in the same manner back when Vick was arrested.

The Pats will try to argue that if Hernandez didn't break the conduct clauses of the CBA, they would never have released him. Again, beats me if they have a case or not and how successful they will be.

 
I am not amazed tha the Pats didnt know what was going on with Hernandez off the field.

The talk that he felt Loyd couldnt be trusted shows that he only kept a tight circle of friends he trusted. Friends and associates that would not allow what was going on to anyone outside the trusted group. These people were not going to tell the police or Patriots what was going on. I believe a lot of it was becaue of loyalty and some might of been fear what might happen to them. But word was not coming from this group if he was up to no good.

Not till the last 2 weeks has Hernandez been on the police plotter, so why would the Pats not lock up a key member of thier team. They need to keep the weapons they has since the lack of WRs on the roster was hurting them. This was not a gamble by the Pats giving him the contract anymore than the one they gave Gronk.

 
I think this issue will be the most difficult one BB and the organization has faced...it's very obvious that Hernandez is a bad guy and has been one for awhile...drafting him is one thing...teams roll the dice on "character issues" all the time...it's just a fact of life in pro sports today...the contract extension is a totally different issue...right now it appears only two things could have occurred...one, the Pats security/intelligence (or whatever you want to call it) totally whiffed on the gravity of Hernandez's thuggishness...for a team that dots every I and crosses every T I find that really hard to believe...so does that mean that the Pats were willing to give out big money to a guy that appears to have gang ties and has a lot of bad stuff going on around him...if he's out in Boston hanging with hoods there is absolutely no way the Pats would not know about this...Boston/Eastern Mass is a very close-knit community and these secrets are not easy to keep...especially on a very high profile player...BB likes to keep the media at bay and that strategy often makes a lot of sense regardless of how frustrating it can be...yet, there is absolutely no way that "no comments" or podium shrugs will suffice here...as a fan I want to know how you can let a good soldier like Welker walk for low money (or bench him for foot jokes) yet can give a big contract to what right now appears to be a murderer who was keeping company with some very, very bad people...sorry but Hernandez just did not turn into a bad guy 10 days ago and the Pats need to answer why they did not have better info or why they ignored the info they had...
Is it possible they didn't know Aaron's wherabout's every second of the day? Yes, it is. Maybe they just treated him like an adult.

They're are hundreds of guys in the NFL with 'character' concerns. Some of them get big contracts. How in the hell were the Patriots supposed to know this paticular knuckle-head would allegedly murder somebody?
Maybe you are not keeping up on the info that is coming out...this is not a good person and hasn't been for awhile...we're not talking about DUI's or strip-club nonsense...we're talking about legit gang-ties...not saying they should know he was going to kill someone...that's being a Monday morning QB...I am saying that this appears to be a guy that you don't give 40 mil to after you have had under your watch for 2+ years...
and you're saying it after he murders somebody, when I guarantee a few months ago you thought it was a steal for the pats.

list up here all other players in the nfl who hang with seedy riffraff and gang members -- or are you just going to wait for them to murder somebody and it gets blasted all over the news?
Who do you think should have more information about the behavior of Hernandez - the Pats organization, or FBG's poster Boston?
Who should know more about him killing someone - the police or his employer?

 
I think this issue will be the most difficult one BB and the organization has faced...it's very obvious that Hernandez is a bad guy and has been one for awhile...drafting him is one thing...teams roll the dice on "character issues" all the time...it's just a fact of life in pro sports today...the contract extension is a totally different issue...right now it appears only two things could have occurred...one, the Pats security/intelligence (or whatever you want to call it) totally whiffed on the gravity of Hernandez's thuggishness...for a team that dots every I and crosses every T I find that really hard to believe...so does that mean that the Pats were willing to give out big money to a guy that appears to have gang ties and has a lot of bad stuff going on around him...if he's out in Boston hanging with hoods there is absolutely no way the Pats would not know about this...Boston/Eastern Mass is a very close-knit community and these secrets are not easy to keep...especially on a very high profile player...BB likes to keep the media at bay and that strategy often makes a lot of sense regardless of how frustrating it can be...yet, there is absolutely no way that "no comments" or podium shrugs will suffice here...as a fan I want to know how you can let a good soldier like Welker walk for low money (or bench him for foot jokes) yet can give a big contract to what right now appears to be a murderer who was keeping company with some very, very bad people...sorry but Hernandez just did not turn into a bad guy 10 days ago and the Pats need to answer why they did not have better info or why they ignored the info they had...
Is it possible they didn't know Aaron's wherabout's every second of the day? Yes, it is. Maybe they just treated him like an adult.

They're are hundreds of guys in the NFL with 'character' concerns. Some of them get big contracts. How in the hell were the Patriots supposed to know this paticular knuckle-head would allegedly murder somebody?
Maybe you are not keeping up on the info that is coming out...this is not a good person and hasn't been for awhile...we're not talking about DUI's or strip-club nonsense...we're talking about legit gang-ties...not saying they should know he was going to kill someone...that's being a Monday morning QB...I am saying that this appears to be a guy that you don't give 40 mil to after you have had under your watch for 2+ years...
and you're saying it after he murders somebody, when I guarantee a few months ago you thought it was a steal for the pats.

list up here all other players in the nfl who hang with seedy riffraff and gang members -- or are you just going to wait for them to murder somebody and it gets blasted all over the news?
Who do you think should have more information about the behavior of Hernandez - the Pats organization, or FBG's poster Boston?
Who should know more about him killing someone - the police or his employer?
His #####

 
and you're saying it after he murders somebody, when I guarantee a few months ago you thought it was a steal for the pats.

list up here all other players in the nfl who hang with seedy riffraff and gang members -- or are you just going to wait for them to murder somebody and it gets blasted all over the news?
Ok, I'll bite. Your point has some small bit of merit, but you are taking it too far and end up comparing apples to oranges.

Right or wrong, the reason folks here say that they (the Patriot organization) should have seen something is because they are "there" and have access to AH that none of us do. If any of the folks here had the same access to the entirety of information that the Patriot organization has had, you would be spot on. As it is, that is clearly and obviously not the case.

So while your point does have some merit.... to see these continued ridiculous challenges for prognostication is either completely tongue-in-cheek... or a good bit over the top.

 
Serious question -> if Hernandez's contract had expired entering this off-season and, for no particular reason, the Patriots let him free agency, how many teams do you think would have aggressively pursued Hernandez?

 
Serious question -> if Hernandez's contract had expired entering this off-season and, for no particular reason, the Patriots let him free agency, how many teams do you think would have aggressively pursued Hernandez?
There would have been several teams after him with his talents. He has staid off the police plotter and their where no national rumors he was out of control.

 
Serious question -> if Hernandez's contract had expired entering this off-season and, for no particular reason, the Patriots let him free agency, how many teams do you think would have aggressively pursued Hernandez?
Tons of teams would have pursued him and signing him would have proved a poor choice based on his current situation. Just as the Patriots extending him was a VERY poor choice and will hurt the organization.

Not sure I see what you are getting at. Regardless, the team that signed him would have made a poor descision. In this case, the Patriots made a poor descision.

 
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and you're saying it after he murders somebody, when I guarantee a few months ago you thought it was a steal for the pats.

list up here all other players in the nfl who hang with seedy riffraff and gang members -- or are you just going to wait for them to murder somebody and it gets blasted all over the news?
Patriots gambled and lost. Its comical that you are having problems with this. The bottom line is they gave a huge very "Non-Patriot Way" contract to the worst person they could have, kind of ironic really. They have let plenty of guys walk, yet they loosen the purse strings a bit for Hernandez and he was clearly littered with red flags. We don't even know HALF the stuff the Patriots organization must. Very poor judgment was made in this instance.

 
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It's time to stop playing blame game for who failed with Aaron Hernandez

Gregg Doyel

Quote

Aaron Hernandez is not an indictment of Urban Meyer. He's not a stain on Bill Belichick. He's not a product of the SEC drug-testing policy.

What is Aaron Hernandez? A murderer, prosecutors in Massachusetts say. A fairly large idiot in the best of circumstances, possibly a killer who should never breathe free oxygen again. The legal system will decide which, but it won't be soon.

While the case grinds slowly toward trial, that gives us time -- too much time -- to decide what Aaron Hernandez is. But already in some corners he has moved on from Aaron Hernandez: tight end. He's not even Aaron Hernandez: accused murderer.

Now he's Aaron Hernandez: convenient example of (your agenda here). He's Aaron Hernandez: excuse to bash (your target here).

He's an excuse to bash Urban Meyer, whose tenure at Florida was full of players being arrested or failing drug tests or both. It happens at big-time football programs all over, but it seemed to happen more commonly at Meyer's Florida, which means it's open season for people who don't like Meyer -- and that's a lot of you, for whatever reason -- to link Hernandez's alleged crime to Meyer's alleged discipline.

Hernandez was an adult of 23 when prosecutors say he and two other men picked up Odin Lloyd on June 17, drove him to an industrial park and executed him. You can say Meyer should have done more to punish his misbehaving players when they were at Florida. I've said that myself. But what you cannot do -- not in anything resembling good conscience -- is suggest that Odin Lloyd would be alive today had Meyer been harder on Hernandez or Chris Rainey or any of the other jerks on those Florida teams. Odin Lloyd is dead because he ran into evil. Evil doesn't become evil because it wasn't suspended for the Georgia game.

For some reason Aaron Hernandez is an excuse to bash Bill Belichick, whose tenure at New England has included players who were signed because they were sterling at football, if not life. It happens at franchises all over the NFL, more at New England than some others, which means it's open season for people who don't like Belichick -- and that's a lot of you, for whatever reason -- to link Hernandez's alleged crime to Belichick's philosophy.

Belichick can be cold to the media and ruthless to opposing teams and accepting of players with pock marks in their past, and his Patriots did cheat by videotaping opposing coaches during their 16-0 season of 2007, all of which has nothing to do with allegations that Aaron Hernandez filled Odin Lloyd with .45 caliber bullets until Lloyd stopped breathing.

For some reason Aaron Hernandez is an excuse to bash the SEC drug-testing policy, or lack thereof, which has created a competitive disadvantage whereby some schools are more willing than others to suspend players. One-time Heisman finalist Tyrann Mathieu says he failed more than 10 drug tests at LSU. Hernandez reportedly failed multiple times at Florida.

SEC football has its issues, whether it's rogue coaches or stupid boosters or the general feeling that too many resources -- legal and otherwise -- are being devoted to winning. None of which has a thing to do with allegations that Aaron Hernandez thought the proper way to deal with Odin Lloyd was to exterminate him.

I understand the news cycle, the temptation for easy clicks, the need to advance the fascinating, awful story of Aaron Hernandez. And there's lots of time between now and trial to do that. Hell, there's almost a month between now and his next scheduled court date, July 24, for a probable cause hearing. Then comes the possibility of a grand jury, indictment, depositions. Trial could be a year away.

Meantime there are stories to write and things to say, but Aaron Hernandez is not a mallet to be used to whack the moles in football's yard. He is not a device to further your agenda. He is not an excuse to mock the coaches, teams or leagues for whom he has played.

He is a cautionary tale, I'll go along with that, but not for the discipline of Urban Meyer or the roster of Bill Belichick or the drug-testing of the SEC. Hernandez is a cautionary tale for young men everywhere, athletes and otherwise, who think it's OK to settle their differences with deadly violence.

That's what happened to Odin Lloyd sometime after 2:30 a.m. on June 17. He ran into someone who thought five squeezes of a .45 caliber semi-automatic's trigger was the solution to a problem.

A jury will tell us whether that someone was Aaron Hernandez, but I can tell you this: Whatever the jury decides, Odin Lloyd is dead because he got too close to evil -- not too close to the wrong locker room.
 
Kool-Aid Larry said:
It's time to stop playing blame game for who failed with Aaron Hernandez

Gregg Doyel

Quote

Aaron Hernandez is not an indictment of Urban Meyer. He's not a stain on Bill Belichick. He's not a product of the SEC drug-testing policy.

What is Aaron Hernandez? A murderer, prosecutors in Massachusetts say. A fairly large idiot in the best of circumstances, possibly a killer who should never breathe free oxygen again. The legal system will decide which, but it won't be soon.

While the case grinds slowly toward trial, that gives us time -- too much time -- to decide what Aaron Hernandez is. But already in some corners he has moved on from Aaron Hernandez: tight end. He's not even Aaron Hernandez: accused murderer.

Now he's Aaron Hernandez: convenient example of (your agenda here). He's Aaron Hernandez: excuse to bash (your target here).

He's an excuse to bash Urban Meyer, whose tenure at Florida was full of players being arrested or failing drug tests or both. It happens at big-time football programs all over, but it seemed to happen more commonly at Meyer's Florida, which means it's open season for people who don't like Meyer -- and that's a lot of you, for whatever reason -- to link Hernandez's alleged crime to Meyer's alleged discipline.

Hernandez was an adult of 23 when prosecutors say he and two other men picked up Odin Lloyd on June 17, drove him to an industrial park and executed him. You can say Meyer should have done more to punish his misbehaving players when they were at Florida. I've said that myself. But what you cannot do -- not in anything resembling good conscience -- is suggest that Odin Lloyd would be alive today had Meyer been harder on Hernandez or Chris Rainey or any of the other jerks on those Florida teams. Odin Lloyd is dead because he ran into evil. Evil doesn't become evil because it wasn't suspended for the Georgia game.

For some reason Aaron Hernandez is an excuse to bash Bill Belichick, whose tenure at New England has included players who were signed because they were sterling at football, if not life. It happens at franchises all over the NFL, more at New England than some others, which means it's open season for people who don't like Belichick -- and that's a lot of you, for whatever reason -- to link Hernandez's alleged crime to Belichick's philosophy.

Belichick can be cold to the media and ruthless to opposing teams and accepting of players with pock marks in their past, and his Patriots did cheat by videotaping opposing coaches during their 16-0 season of 2007, all of which has nothing to do with allegations that Aaron Hernandez filled Odin Lloyd with .45 caliber bullets until Lloyd stopped breathing.

For some reason Aaron Hernandez is an excuse to bash the SEC drug-testing policy, or lack thereof, which has created a competitive disadvantage whereby some schools are more willing than others to suspend players. One-time Heisman finalist Tyrann Mathieu says he failed more than 10 drug tests at LSU. Hernandez reportedly failed multiple times at Florida.

SEC football has its issues, whether it's rogue coaches or stupid boosters or the general feeling that too many resources -- legal and otherwise -- are being devoted to winning. None of which has a thing to do with allegations that Aaron Hernandez thought the proper way to deal with Odin Lloyd was to exterminate him.

I understand the news cycle, the temptation for easy clicks, the need to advance the fascinating, awful story of Aaron Hernandez. And there's lots of time between now and trial to do that. Hell, there's almost a month between now and his next scheduled court date, July 24, for a probable cause hearing. Then comes the possibility of a grand jury, indictment, depositions. Trial could be a year away.

Meantime there are stories to write and things to say, but Aaron Hernandez is not a mallet to be used to whack the moles in football's yard. He is not a device to further your agenda. He is not an excuse to mock the coaches, teams or leagues for whom he has played.

He is a cautionary tale, I'll go along with that, but not for the discipline of Urban Meyer or the roster of Bill Belichick or the drug-testing of the SEC. Hernandez is a cautionary tale for young men everywhere, athletes and otherwise, who think it's OK to settle their differences with deadly violence.

That's what happened to Odin Lloyd sometime after 2:30 a.m. on June 17. He ran into someone who thought five squeezes of a .45 caliber semi-automatic's trigger was the solution to a problem.

A jury will tell us whether that someone was Aaron Hernandez, but I can tell you this: Whatever the jury decides, Odin Lloyd is dead because he got too close to evil -- not too close to the wrong locker room.
This article is a separate issue -- as to why we can't blame others for the decisions Aaron Hernandez made. What we can do is criticize the decision the Patriots made in giving Hernandez guaranteed money and a contract extension, with the assumption that they were aware of his background and that he wasn't exactly highly regarded by his teammates. If they weren't aware of any of these signs (and I'm of the opinion the Patriots have the resources to thoroughly vet their players), it makes the Patriots look even worse.

 
This article is a separate issue -- as to why we can't blame others for the decisions Aaron Hernandez made. What we can do is criticize the decision the Patriots made in giving Hernandez guaranteed money and a contract extension, with the assumption that they were aware of his background and that he wasn't exactly highly regarded by his teammates. If they weren't aware of any of these signs (and I'm of the opinion the Patriots have the resources to thoroughly vet their players), it makes the Patriots look even worse.
I don't care how much a bad seed a player appears to be, I think it's pretty much impossible to predict that someone will actually commit murder. I don't know how many players have played in the NFL and how many have been charged with murder while still a player, but I'm guessing the percentage is really, really small. Granted, the likelihood might be higher than the average citizen given the violent nature of the game, but still I don't think teams enter contract negotiations wondering if the player is going to off someone.

Sure, NE likely had more knowledge on AH having been a troublemaker when he was younger, but maybe they actually did think he had matured and turned the corner and was being a better person and better teammate. AFTER THE FACT, Pats players are now suggesting he was a problem. But where were they prior to the murder one charges? Why didn't they speak out then?

The Patriots may also be able to, or at least try to, get some of their money back. Pats beat writer recently posted this on his blog for ESPN . . .

Q. With the release of Hernandez, can the Patriots recoup any of the signing bonus or recover any of the cap charge due to the reason he was released? How does that process work? Whatever happened with Jonathan Fanene's signing bonus? Did the Pats get relief from that as well? -- Jan, Auburn, N.H.

A. That’s another layer to this situation that has come into focus as the Patriots cut ties with one of the highest-paid players on the roster. The salary cap can be tricky in the NFL, and I spent time on the phone with a league contact Wednesday to dig deeper into the ramifications. Based on what we know, the Patriots’ decision to cut Hernandez yesterday prevents them from recouping any of the guaranteed money paid out to him already. They’re on the hook for a cap hit of more than $5 million for 2013 and $7.5 million in 2014.

What we don’t know is how much, if any, communication the team has had with the NFL since the investigation began. It is possible that conversations took place regarding the situation and my understanding is that there may be avenues for the team to take to get some of this money back. Salary cap matters are always complicated and often involve deliberate processes. That’s something we’ll be following up on in the coming weeks.

As a testament to the deliberate manner in which these processes take place, the Fanene situation remains ongoing, with the door still open to the team getting money back from his signing bonus.

 
I still think The Patriots should have had some knowledge and known better before giving him the big contract. As previously mentioned, you don't throw out that kind of money to a player with his questionable past without covering all the angles. If the Boston radio show caller is to be believed, "gang-banging" seemed like a pretty regular occurrence for AH.

http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/story/aaron-hernandez-first-degree-murder-gun-charges--bill-belichick-robert-kraft-should-have-known-better-062613

 
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this isnt like Joe Paterno keeping quiet about child rape at PSU. The Patriots didnt know he was murdering people and hide it then all of a sudden decide to cut him. He seemed to have turned his life around, and earned a big contract but he just simply fooled everyone. It happens in all walks of life.

 
Hard to predict this IMO. I'm sure they knew the crowd he was running with. I'm sure they knew the risk of a weed suspension, or a bar fight, maybe a gun charge. And in today's NFL that stuff is a pretty good risk to take IMO -- tons of criminals suiting up every week.

This case is just so bizarre that it's almost hard to believe even now. Hard to see how anyone could have seen this coming.
Agreed. Probably had some idea he was still hanging with the bad crowd, but I bet a ton of NFL players are. No way of predicting that he would be stupid enough to murder a person, or people.
I agree. From the reports I've read he put on a good face leading all the way up to his big contract, at which point he reverted back to his old gangster ways.

 

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