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General Malaise "vs." reading comprehension ; also some talk of skyim and the elder scrolls


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As several have mentioned efficient leveling in Oblivion was far from intuitive and a serious drawback, but as fasteddie mentioned, for PC gamers the modding community quickly deals with such problems. Things like the Skill Diary and Francesco's (or Oscuro's) leveling mods elevate the game immensely. I am confident the same will hold true for Skyrim.

Edited by Chaka
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The strategy guide is 650 pages. Jeebus.

And only $16.19 on Amazon. http://www.amazon.com/Elder-Scrolls-Skyrim-Prima-Official/dp/0307891372/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1320168495&sr=8-1

The GOTY game guide is going to well over 800 pages I would guess.

The CE version is only a couple of bucks more, hardback, and access to an interactive world map that shows as much or as little as you want it to. :thumbup:

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I don't understand why anyone would get a game guide. They take half the fun out of these games.

I don't have the time or the patience to figure out the minutiae of everything in games anymore, especially now given the breadth and complexity of the worlds these developers create. When I was 14, I was happy to spend 6 months of my life doing nothing but trying to burn down every bush and bomb every canyon wall in Zelda. Nowadays, if I can't figure out/kill/get past something in a videogame in about an hour, I look for an answer online. :shrug:
Agreed. I seldom use it for getting past bosses but it is too easy to miss good treasure because it is hidden in the most obscure places. Fin Gleam anyone?
Had to google that one. I get it. I use guides sometimes for 100%ing a game or if I've been stuck for a great while. But isn't part of the fun of playing the game through the first time not knowing where everything is?
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I don't understand why anyone would get a game guide. They take half the fun out of these games.

I don't have the time or the patience to figure out the minutiae of everything in games anymore, especially now given the breadth and complexity of the worlds these developers create. When I was 14, I was happy to spend 6 months of my life doing nothing but trying to burn down every bush and bomb every canyon wall in Zelda. Nowadays, if I can't figure out/kill/get past something in a videogame in about an hour, I look for an answer online. :shrug:

Agreed. I seldom use it for getting past bosses but it is too easy to miss good treasure because it is hidden in the most obscure places. Fin Gleam anyone?

Had to google that one. I get it. I use guides sometimes for 100%ing a game or if I've been stuck for a great while. But isn't part of the fun of playing the game through the first time not knowing where everything is?

Absolutely. You don't open with the answer.
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I don't understand why anyone would get a game guide. They take half the fun out of these games.

Not for me. I love reading the game guides as stand alone books, the Fallout 3 GOTY guide was so full of information it was incredible.

For games the size of Skyrim where serious players may put in more than 250 hours, the guides are needed just sometimes to see what you missed in the game. I am not talking about the main quest or the guild quests but some of the side quests that are easily missable.

I usually do these my second run through, and by then all that info is available online.

Game guides are a scam.

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I don't understand why anyone would get a game guide. They take half the fun out of these games.

Not for me. I love reading the game guides as stand alone books, the Fallout 3 GOTY guide was so full of information it was incredible.

For games the size of Skyrim where serious players may put in more than 250 hours, the guides are needed just sometimes to see what you missed in the game. I am not talking about the main quest or the guild quests but some of the side quests that are easily missable.

I usually do these my second run through, and by then all that info is available online.

Game guides are a scam.

You are correct the Wikias are wonderful. I still prefer holding a book if I can though.
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As several have mentioned efficient leveling in Oblivion was far from intuitive and a serious drawback, but as fasteddie mentioned, for PC gamers the modding community quickly deals with such problems. Things like the Skill Diary and Francesco's (or Oscuro's) leveling mods elevate the game immensely. I am confident the same will hold true for Skyrim.

Pretty sure they overhauled the leveling system in Skyrim.It was by far the worst thing about Oblivion. If you wanted to be an master marksmen you had shoot crabs and crap over and over and over and over.Or how about gaining merch skill?So repetitive. So annoying.
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I don't understand why anyone would get a game guide. They take half the fun out of these games.

Not for me. I love reading the game guides as stand alone books, the Fallout 3 GOTY guide was so full of information it was incredible.

For games the size of Skyrim where serious players may put in more than 250 hours, the guides are needed just sometimes to see what you missed in the game. I am not talking about the main quest or the guild quests but some of the side quests that are easily missable.

I usually do these my second run through, and by then all that info is available online.

Game guides are a scam.

I agree but not every system will let you functionally alt+tab back and forth between a game and other open windows. So you have to get the info down from the wiki before starting the quest.
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Re: Fin Gleam - was that connected to any quest or NPC conversations?

Seems like a very rare exception item that the gamemakers threw in for fun.

No mention of Fin Gleam in game play at all. But it is hardly the only item of that nature.

Also many of the free form quests are so random that you'll never find them without the guide or hundreds of hours of game time. Too inconvenient for people out of high school.

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Re: Fin Gleam - was that connected to any quest or NPC conversations?

Seems like a very rare exception item that the gamemakers threw in for fun.

No mention of Fin Gleam in game play at all. But it is hardly the only item of that nature.

Also many of the free form quests are so random that you'll never find them without the guide or hundreds of hours of game time. Too inconvenient for people out of high school.

I'm far gone from high school, so I understand. But to me these side quests and the such are an essential element in replay value. Make a new totally different character and explore. This is why I played Oblivion for years. It's not like I sit there after it first comes out playing on Mountain Dew crack until I slump over drooling on myself.
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As several have mentioned efficient leveling in Oblivion was far from intuitive and a serious drawback, but as fasteddie mentioned, for PC gamers the modding community quickly deals with such problems. Things like the Skill Diary and Francesco's (or Oscuro's) leveling mods elevate the game immensely. I am confident the same will hold true for Skyrim.

Pretty sure they overhauled the leveling system in Skyrim.It was by far the worst thing about Oblivion. If you wanted to be an master marksmen you had shoot crabs and crap over and over and over and over.Or how about gaining merch skill?So repetitive. So annoying.
:goodposting: I absolutely love this series but the leveling system in Oblivion absolutely ruined the game for me.
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As several have mentioned efficient leveling in Oblivion was far from intuitive and a serious drawback, but as fasteddie mentioned, for PC gamers the modding community quickly deals with such problems. Things like the Skill Diary and Francesco's (or Oscuro's) leveling mods elevate the game immensely. I am confident the same will hold true for Skyrim.

Pretty sure they overhauled the leveling system in Skyrim.It was by far the worst thing about Oblivion. If you wanted to be an master marksmen you had shoot crabs and crap over and over and over and over.Or how about gaining merch skill?So repetitive. So annoying.
It's unclear how much has changed in this regard.Trying to get a handle on exactly what is going on with skills/leveling is less than straightforward, but the way I read it is that you still have skill levels. The skill levels are determined by usage. So to become a master marksmen you're going to have to shoot ####.What's changed is how this plays into your overall leveling. Now all skill increases push you further up towards the next level with higher-level skill increases pushing you further than lower. So increasing a skill from 52 to 55 may have the same overall level increase as increasing a different skill from 5 to 18.
More info:What appears to be tossed was the moronic non intuitive major and minor skills and the weird calculation between skills and attributes. Now it appears basic. Increase your skills by use. As your skills increase you will level. When you level you choose to upgrade health, magic or stamina and then choose a perk. There are 250 perks with multiple levels which should lead to an enormous amount of different character builds. The game is designed such that you level faster than Fallout or Oblivion. Most players will max out at 50 but the game theoretically can keep going until the mid 70's according to reports. Also they removed the fact that everyone levels with you allowing the feeling of your character being stronger. The game counters the possibility of over leveling by being careful to send you on dungeon quests that are appropriate for your skill level.
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As several have mentioned efficient leveling in Oblivion was far from intuitive and a serious drawback, but as fasteddie mentioned, for PC gamers the modding community quickly deals with such problems. Things like the Skill Diary and Francesco's (or Oscuro's) leveling mods elevate the game immensely. I am confident the same will hold true for Skyrim.

Pretty sure they overhauled the leveling system in Skyrim.

It was by far the worst thing about Oblivion. If you wanted to be an master marksmen you had shoot crabs and crap over and over and over and over.

Or how about gaining merch skill?

So repetitive. So annoying.

It's unclear how much has changed in this regard.

Trying to get a handle on exactly what is going on with skills/leveling is less than straightforward, but the way I read it is that you still have skill levels. The skill levels are determined by usage. So to become a master marksmen you're going to have to shoot ####.

What's changed is how this plays into your overall leveling. Now all skill increases push you further up towards the next level with higher-level skill increases pushing you further than lower. So increasing a skill from 52 to 55 may have the same overall level increase as increasing a different skill from 5 to 18.

More info:

What appears to be tossed was the moronic non intuitive major and minor skills and the weird calculation between skills and attributes.

Now it appears basic.

Increase your skills by use. As your skills increase you will level. When you level you choose to upgrade health, magic or stamina and then choose a perk.

There are 250 perks with multiple levels which should lead to an enormous amount of different character builds.

The game is designed such that you level faster than Fallout or Oblivion. Most players will max out at 50 but the game theoretically can keep going until the mid 70's according to reports.

Also they removed the fact that everyone levels with you allowing the feeling of your character being stronger. The game counters the possibility of over leveling by being careful to send you on dungeon quests that are appropriate for your skill level.

This is huge. It always felt like there was no reason to level up in Oblivion
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Also they removed the fact that everyone levels with you allowing the feeling of your character being stronger. The game counters the possibility of over leveling by being careful to send you on dungeon quests that are appropriate for your skill level.

This is huge. It always felt like there was no reason to level up in Oblivion
:goodposting:

Leveling up in Oblivion was often a mistake that could render the game practically unplayable if you weren't careful. Fallout 3 and Fallout: NV got it basically right, with enemies that leveled up a little but not as fast as your character.

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Re: Fin Gleam - was that connected to any quest or NPC conversations?

Seems like a very rare exception item that the gamemakers threw in for fun.

No mention of Fin Gleam in game play at all. But it is hardly the only item of that nature.

Also many of the free form quests are so random that you'll never find them without the guide or hundreds of hours of game time. Too inconvenient for people out of high school.

I'm far gone from high school, so I understand. But to me these side quests and the such are an essential element in replay value. Make a new totally different character and explore. This is why I played Oblivion for years. It's not like I sit there after it first comes out playing on Mountain Dew crack until I slump over drooling on myself.
I played Oblivion a ton (fired it up again a couple weeks ago in anticipation of Skyrim). I want to be clear that while I endorse using strategy guides I am by no means suggesting that you open it the first time through the main quest (what's the point of the game if you do that) or that you use it as some sort of step-by-step instruction guide (e.g. go to quest 1, then quest 2, then quest 3, repeat until all quests are finished). First time I usually will crack a guide would be after I finish the main quest the first time, at that point it provides me with insight into cool things I might have missed the first time through.

If you play Oblivion again I do strongly recommend acquiring Fin Gleam as soon as possible after you exit the sewers. Having night eye on command is a blessing in dungeons. I think Fin Gleam is my favorite piece of equipment after the Gray Cowl of the Nocturnal.

Another great bit of info I picked up from the strategy guide is how to complete the Thieves Guild quest without destroying the Boots of Springheel Jack, which are another fun bit of equipment for your arsenal.

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As several have mentioned efficient leveling in Oblivion was far from intuitive and a serious drawback, but as fasteddie mentioned, for PC gamers the modding community quickly deals with such problems. Things like the Skill Diary and Francesco's (or Oscuro's) leveling mods elevate the game immensely. I am confident the same will hold true for Skyrim.

Pretty sure they overhauled the leveling system in Skyrim.

It was by far the worst thing about Oblivion. If you wanted to be an master marksmen you had shoot crabs and crap over and over and over and over.

Or how about gaining merch skill?

So repetitive. So annoying.

It's unclear how much has changed in this regard.

Trying to get a handle on exactly what is going on with skills/leveling is less than straightforward, but the way I read it is that you still have skill levels. The skill levels are determined by usage. So to become a master marksmen you're going to have to shoot ####.

What's changed is how this plays into your overall leveling. Now all skill increases push you further up towards the next level with higher-level skill increases pushing you further than lower. So increasing a skill from 52 to 55 may have the same overall level increase as increasing a different skill from 5 to 18.

Also what's changed is the "perks" system which seems to have taken the place of most of the benefits of increasing your skill levels. Before, as you increased a certain skill up the levels, you got certain benefits. So if you mastered Destruction, those spells were a lot cheaper for you than they were before. Now you invest perks (which you get 1 per level) to lower destruction spell cost or somesuch. So I'm kinda thrown on what leveling your skills actually does other than factor into your overall leveling.

This does move things away from efficient leveling where you choose your primary skills that you're not going to use and/or can control to ensure that you didn't level too fast. So that's a plus. But the rest is kinda murky to me.

ETA: Another thing on efficient leveling (or maybe just another way to talk about it). The most annoying thing to me about leveling in Oblivion, and what this seems to do away with, is the primary stat/attribute increases... bumps to INT, END, DEX, etc. Because in Oblivion, I'd be playing the game, get close to a level, then stop "playing the game" to go put on heavy armor and get 200 times to make sure that my END saw a max +5 increase. And then I'd level and go back to playing the game. So maybe 80% of the time was spent enjoying the game and 20% of it was spent grinding it out to get the most out of each level. In Skyrim, all those player attributes have been removed. That's got to end up being a big plus even if it moves it away from the D&D roots.

Yeah, I think this became pretty common among regular players of Oblivion. It's a PITA and I hope it improves in Skyrim but I also viewed it as paying your dues. Sometimes in life you just gotta grind through it.
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I don't understand why anyone would get a game guide. They take half the fun out of these games.

I can see why folks use them, but I feel like it would take something away from the game for me too. Never used one.
I'm like some of the others in that I never used these except for the ones that were annoying to figure out. I.E., you must be in this exact spot at this exact time of the day to complete the quest. A puzzle or something, yah, I'd like to figure it out. A random solution that it would take hours of game play to stumble upon, yah, I'll look it up on a wiki or something.
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As several have mentioned efficient leveling in Oblivion was far from intuitive and a serious drawback, but as fasteddie mentioned, for PC gamers the modding community quickly deals with such problems. Things like the Skill Diary and Francesco's (or Oscuro's) leveling mods elevate the game immensely. I am confident the same will hold true for Skyrim.

Pretty sure they overhauled the leveling system in Skyrim.

It was by far the worst thing about Oblivion. If you wanted to be an master marksmen you had shoot crabs and crap over and over and over and over.

Or how about gaining merch skill?

So repetitive. So annoying.

It's unclear how much has changed in this regard.

Trying to get a handle on exactly what is going on with skills/leveling is less than straightforward, but the way I read it is that you still have skill levels. The skill levels are determined by usage. So to become a master marksmen you're going to have to shoot ####.

What's changed is how this plays into your overall leveling. Now all skill increases push you further up towards the next level with higher-level skill increases pushing you further than lower. So increasing a skill from 52 to 55 may have the same overall level increase as increasing a different skill from 5 to 18.

Also what's changed is the "perks" system which seems to have taken the place of most of the benefits of increasing your skill levels. Before, as you increased a certain skill up the levels, you got certain benefits. So if you mastered Destruction, those spells were a lot cheaper for you than they were before. Now you invest perks (which you get 1 per level) to lower destruction spell cost or somesuch. So I'm kinda thrown on what leveling your skills actually does other than factor into your overall leveling.

This does move things away from efficient leveling where you choose your primary skills that you're not going to use and/or can control to ensure that you didn't level too fast. So that's a plus. But the rest is kinda murky to me.

ETA: Another thing on efficient leveling (or maybe just another way to talk about it). The most annoying thing to me about leveling in Oblivion, and what this seems to do away with, is the primary stat/attribute increases... bumps to INT, END, DEX, etc. Because in Oblivion, I'd be playing the game, get close to a level, then stop "playing the game" to go put on heavy armor and get 200 times to make sure that my END saw a max +5 increase. And then I'd level and go back to playing the game. So maybe 80% of the time was spent enjoying the game and 20% of it was spent grinding it out to get the most out of each level. In Skyrim, all those player attributes have been removed. That's got to end up being a big plus even if it moves it away from the D&D roots.

Yeah, I think this became pretty common among regular players of Oblivion. It's a PITA and I hope it improves in Skyrim but I also viewed it as paying your dues. Sometimes in life you just gotta grind through it.
I hope they didn't change it too much, though. The developers - going all the way back to Arena and Daggerfall - wanted people to just play, and the stats will generally take care of themselves. If you want to be a mage, be a mage, and your mage stats will increase/etc. It's actually a pretty cool way to look at it, but it's not a system that goes well with min/maxing.

The one part I didn't like was having skills increase because you ran and jumped. THAT was really silly, because it made you "level" way too fast.

Also, put me down for hating the enemies that leveled right with you - having bandits in glass armor (etc) was ridiculous. That said, in a game like this, you do have to have some kind of auto-leveling, less the game would become a complete bore later on. Exploring should always be somewhat dangerous, no matter your "level". Wildlife and bandits should always pose some kind of threat.

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Here is some summarized skill info from a Wiki for Skyrim

*Mysticism is no longer a school of magic, but the spells under it have been moved to other schools of magic

*Acrobatics and Athletics skills have been removed (you now have a fixed jumping height, running speed is increased by upgrading stamina,also depends on the armor type used)

*Skyrim will have a total of 18 skills (Oblivion had 21, Morrowind had 27 )

*Enchanting is back

*No Major/Minor Skills. (every skill advancement will contribute to leveling up.)

*No Birth Signs.

*Guardian Stones exist that allow you to increase the speed at which you raise certain skills.

*Advancing a skill from 30-31 will contribute more to a level-up than advancing a skill from 10-11.

*A soft level-cap at 50, meaning you can still level-up after this, but it will go extremely slow. A mathematical cap exists around level 75.

*Leveling is faster than in previous games.

*Eight attributes from Oblivion (Strength, Endurance, etc.) have been "removed." The effects from these attributes have been moved to other areas (skills and perks).

*At each level you gain a small amount of health, magicka, and stamina; and the choice to increase one of them by more.

*6 Magic Schools: Destruction, Alteration, Conjuration, Restoration, Enchanting, & Illusion.

*There's a total of around 220 Perks (Including Ranks). - For instance, one perk will decrease the sound of your footsteps.

*It is possible to raise all skills to 100 but not possible to get all perks.

*Pickpocket is a separate skill (in contrast to Oblivion where a successful pickpocket attempt depended on Sneak).

*Hand to Hand is no longer a skill. It has been confirmed however that bar fights using your fists are possible in Skyrim.

*There will be a One Handed skill. (Blade,axe,etc are now specialized with perks)

*There won't be any spears in Skyrim.

Edited by NewlyRetired
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Here is some summarized skill info from a Wiki for Skyrim *Mysticism is no longer a school of magic, but the spells under it have been moved to other schools of magic *Acrobatics and Athletics skills have been removed (you now have a fixed jumping height, running speed is increased by upgrading stamina,also depends on the armor type used) *Skyrim will have a total of 18 skills (Oblivion had 21, Morrowind had 27 ) *Enchanting is back *No Major/Minor Skills. (every skill advancement will contribute to leveling up.) *No Birth Signs. *Guardian Stones exist that allow you to increase the speed at which you raise certain skills. *Advancing a skill from 30-31 will contribute more to a level-up than advancing a skill from 10-11. *A soft level-cap at 50, meaning you can still level-up after this, but it will go extremely slow. A mathematical cap exists around level 75. *Leveling is faster than in previous games. *Eight attributes from Oblivion (Strength, Endurance, etc.) have been "removed." The effects from these attributes have been moved to other areas (skills and perks). *At each level you gain a small amount of health, magicka, and stamina; and the choice to increase one of them by more. *6 Magic Schools: Destruction, Alteration, Conjuration, Restoration, Enchanting, & Illusion. *There's a total of around 220 Perks (Including Ranks). - For instance, one perk will decrease the sound of your footsteps. *It is possible to raise all skills to 100 but not possible to get all perks. *Pickpocket is a separate skill (in contrast to Oblivion where a successful pickpocket attempt depended on Sneak). *Hand to Hand is no longer a skill. It has been confirmed however that bar fights using your fists are possible in Skyrim. *There will be a One Handed skill. (Blade,axe,etc are now specialized with perks) *There won't be any spears in Skyrim.

Everything here sounds great.I do have to say this for Bethesda - they definitely have improved the overall game each time (for most things, anyway). And if they do make a mistake (like nerfing enchanting/etc), they put it back. The one part I miss is the scale of Daggerfall. I loved that HUGE scale. Even Morrowind seemed to have a pretty large sense of scale, despite actually being smaller than Oblivion. Oblivion got annoying in that there was a fort/dungeon/ruin every 50 feet. The sense of discovery that Daggerfall had was diminished. I hope this one is a little better in terms of scale. But that's a minor quibble.Can't wait - this might be a midnight purchase and day off the next day for me. Edited by jwb
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The one part I miss is the scale of Daggerfall. I loved that HUGE scale. Even Morrowind seemed to have a pretty large sense of scale, despite actually being smaller than Oblivion. Oblivion got annoying in that there was a fort/dungeon/ruin every 50 feet. The sense of discovery that Daggerfall had was diminished. I hope this one is a little better in terms of scale. But that's a minor quibble.

From what I have read the general size of the land is similar to Oblivion. But the developers think it will feel bigger to the players because the terrain (outside bad guys) are going to make moving though a mountain more difficult and will force players to take different longer paths.
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It certainly seems from our discussion and some of the tidbits we read online that you will level faster with a one dimensional character than if you try and balance your characters skills.

I'd guess it would actually be about the same. In past games, it took a lot more effort to move up from L48 of a skill to L49 than it did to move from L4 to L5. I'd imagine that's still true.
Yeah that is a good point now that you mention it. Can't wait for you guys to try this game and report back with definitive answers on these things.
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It certainly seems from our discussion and some of the tidbits we read online that you will level faster with a one dimensional character than if you try and balance your characters skills.

I'd guess it would actually be about the same. In past games, it took a lot more effort to move up from L48 of a skill to L49 than it did to move from L4 to L5. I'd imagine that's still true.
Yeah that is a good point now that you mention it. Can't wait for you guys to try this game and report back with definitive answers on these things.
Looks like RedBox is getting this on release day. Looks like I have my weekend filled! :thumbup:
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Didn't read all the replies, but wanted to pass this along. If you want to run a system check to see if your computer will be able to run a specific game, try this:

System Check

Thanks for this.

Can a GB out there tell me if playing this on my PC is a smart move?

I meet all the min requirements and most of the recommended. But there's a few oddities with the two specs I fail.

1.

CPU

Recommended: Quad-core Intel or AMD CPU

You Have: Intel® Core2 Duo CPU T9600 @ 2.80GHz

However, it says my CPU speed is fine. It's just not "quad-core." Is this a big deal?

2.

VIDEO CARD

Recommended: DirectX 9 compatible NVIDIA or AMD ATI video card with 1 GB of RAM (NVIDIA GeForce GTX 260 or higher; ATI Radeon HD 4890 or higher)

You Have: ATI Mobility Radeon HD 4650

However, I exceed various video card requirements -

Video RAM 1 GB (req) --- you have 3.7 GB

Pixel Shader version 3.0 (req) ---- you have 4.1

Vertex Shader version 3.0 (req)---- you have 4.1

WTF?

Everything else measures up to the recommended requirements. I even exceed the rec. RAM by 2 GB.

Thanks for any responses.

Edited by dharmapunk
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Didn't read all the replies, but wanted to pass this along. If you want to run a system check to see if your computer will be able to run a specific game, try this:

System Check

Thanks for this.

Can a GB out there tell me if playing this on my PC is a smart move?

I meet all the min requirements and half the recommended, but there's a few oddities.

1.

CPU

Recommended: Quad-core Intel or AMD CPU

You Have: Intel® Core2 Duo CPU T9600 @ 2.80GHz

However, it says my CPU speed is fine. It's just not "quad-core." Is this a big deal?

2.

VIDEO CARD

Recommended: DirectX 9 compatible NVIDIA or AMD ATI video card with 1 GB of RAM (NVIDIA GeForce GTX 260 or higher; ATI Radeon HD 4890 or higher)

You Have: ATI Mobility Radeon HD 4650

However, I exceed various video card requirements -

Video RAM 1 GB (req) --- you have 3.7 GB

Pixel Shader version 3.0 (req) ---- you have 4.1

Vertex Shader version 3.0 (req)---- you have 4.1

WTF?

Everything else measures up to the recommended requirements. I even exceed the rec. RAM by 2 GB.

Thanks for any responses.

RAM is meaningless above a certain threshold. Throw unlimited RAM on an old video processor and it won't perform any better. You have a mobility processor (i.e., laptop) which is going to purposefully be slower to avoid heat buildup and reduce power consumption.
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RAM is meaningless above a certain threshold. Throw unlimited RAM on an old video processor and it won't perform any better. You have a mobility processor (i.e., laptop) which is going to purposefully be slower to avoid heat buildup and reduce power consumption.

Ok. So will Skyrim run poorly on my laptop? I really like playing RPGs on the PC. It isn't the mods as much as the comfort of playing at my desk, while visiting the in-laws, etc. Playing on the console limits me to the living room madness of my house. That's fine for sports and stuff, but for an immersion RPG, I like the PC. Edited by dharmapunk
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RAM is meaningless above a certain threshold. Throw unlimited RAM on an old video processor and it won't perform any better. You have a mobility processor (i.e., laptop) which is going to purposefully be slower to avoid heat buildup and reduce power consumption.

Ok. So will Skyrim run poorly on my laptop? I really like playing RPGs on the PC. It isn't the mods as much as the comfort of playing at my desk, while visiting the in-laws, etc. Playing on the console limits me to the living room madness of my house. That's fine for sports and stuff, but for an immersion RPG, I like the PC.
Yes, I'd imagine Skyrim would run poorly on nearly any laptop.I prefer pc also, because of mods but also because in the past games had UIs designed with the pc in mind. Now, unfortunately, it's gone the other way and pc gamers just take the ported version from the console so the UIs are crap.
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