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Little Melvin can't be exposed to peanuts (1 Viewer)

Last night Mrs DW and I went to the indoctrination night for my 3 and 1/2 year old daughter's preschool.The evening opened with a benediction and then a prayer where we were supposed to join in with the Minister in beseeching the Lord that we don't screw up our kids by ever taking them to a "secular" preschool. I tell you now that man put more stink on the word "secular" than I have ever heard put on any word before. Next we were subjected to a 5 minute marketing presentation by a christian book seller. Seems some books is christian and some ain't, and it's real clear she not only sells the good stuff, but that she and the teachers are going to do every thing they can to bring peer group pressure to bear so that any kid not possessing the good stuff will be ostrasized. I was fascinated. With the Lord and the school as marketing partners I suspect she is going to do all right. I started to comment to Mrs. DW about the appropriateness of this type of marketing to young minds when I got the stare. Married guys know that stare. I was frightened.Then we moved on to the most remarkable part of the evening, at least in my mind. The director gets up, trundles up to the podium while the baby Elephant Walk song plays in my head, she opens her maw and tells us they have a new student. His name is Melvin. (now normally I would have something to say about parents naming their kid Melvin but with my wife having already used the stare I don't want to push it.) It seems Melvin has peanut allergies. Not just regular peanut allergies, but abnormally sensitive ones. This means, she says, that in addition to not being allowed to bring peanuts, peanut butter, or anything containing peanuts into the school, like say a snickers bar, (every one knows those are packed full of peanuts), we will have to check every product we use on our child for peanut based ingredients. Seems some sunscreens contain the stuff, some popcorns are popped with peanut oil, yada, yada, yada.About here I am busting. Clearly we have some obligations to our fellow man, but I am fairly certain it doesn't extend to checking whether our chld's lip balm or sun screen is thickened with hydrogenated peanut oil. If the kid is that sensitive maybe his parents ought to find other accomodations. It was right then that I am snapped out of my revery when the Director goes on to say that it would be good if we did not allow our kids to even eat peanut butter within a half an hour before going to school.I solicit your thoughts. Is it reasonable that a parent of a child so hypersensitive to a common substance and product to place that child in a setting where scores of other families will now be expected to examine the minutia of their lives to protect that child?Is it acceptable to use the schools to coercively market to kids and their families?

 
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Deranged Hermit

Not cool & Pissed
My wife's a teacher and she has a kid like this in her class. This kid is ULTRA sensitive to not only peanuts, but also a bunch of other stuff as well. Fortunatly the peanut allergy is the worst and is the only one that can hurt her by just being around it, the rest of the stuff needs to be swallowed.I really feel sorry for the poor girl. She's the cutest and happiest little kid you've ever seen. She never complains and always trying to help.

 
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Deranged Hermit

Not cool & Pissed
I solicit your thoughts.

Is it reasonable that a parent of a child so hypersensitive to a common substance and product to place that child in a setting where scores of other families will now be expected to examine the minutia of their lives to protect that child?

Is it acceptable to use the schools to coercively market to kids and their families?
Yeah, I think it's reasonable. It's not that kid's fault he's like that and he needs to be with his peers just like any other kid.As for the marketing, I don't agree with that even a little bit.

 

CletiusMaximus

Footballguy
Melvin's peanut allergy is part of God's plan and Melvin's purpose in the context of that plan, as are your actions, those of your children, and those of the school's administration. Therefore, I wouldn't worry about it. :thumbup:

 

Schlzm

Footballguy
I would suggest finding a normal pre-school for your daughter where kids eat playdough and the organizers wont comdemn you to hell for not buying their friends products.Schlzm

 

Deranged Hermit

Not cool & Pissed
Screw that kid. I would tell my child not to give him nuts or anything like that, but I am not going to alter how my kid eats or what he/she does just because we have the equivalent to the peanut bubble boy in their class.

Home schooling should be an option for the kid I think (I am referring to the peanut freak).
You do realize that the child can die if you send your kid to school with a PB&J sandwich just to prove your point, right? Peanut allergies are usually that bad.
 

PAO

Footballguy
Screw that kid.  I would tell my child not to give him nuts or anything like that, but I am not going to alter how my kid eats or what he/she does just because we have the equivalent to the peanut bubble boy in their class.

Home schooling should be an option for the kid I think (I am referring to the peanut freak).
You do realize that the child can die if you send your kid to school with a PB&J sandwich just to prove your point, right? Peanut allergies are usually that bad.
I'm not proving a point.The child should not be in a public environment if the risk is that great.

Why should everyone else suffer?
:lmao: You must really love PBJ.
 
I solicit your thoughts. 

Is it reasonable that a parent of a child so hypersensitive to a common substance and product to place that child in a setting where scores of other families will now be expected to examine the minutia of their lives to protect that child?

Is it acceptable to use the schools to coercively market to kids and their families?
Yeah, I think it's reasonable. It's not that kid's fault he's like that and he needs to be with his peers just like any other kid.As for the marketing, I don't agree with that even a little bit.
I appreciate it is not the kid's fault. I just find it remarkable that they expect to change the eating and shopping habits of 100 other families to accomodate their child. Were it me I might try to keep my child in a somewhat more controlled environment were he that sensitive. Certainly, no matter hwo cautious people are this is an accident looking for a place to happen.
 
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Deranged Hermit

Not cool & Pissed
Screw that kid.  I would tell my child not to give him nuts or anything like that, but I am not going to alter how my kid eats or what he/she does just because we have the equivalent to the peanut bubble boy in their class.

Home schooling should be an option for the kid I think (I am referring to the peanut freak).
You do realize that the child can die if you send your kid to school with a PB&J sandwich just to prove your point, right? Peanut allergies are usually that bad.
I'm not proving a point.The child should not be in a public environment if the risk is that great.

Why should everyone else suffer?
:fishing: You have to be fishing. No one can be that dumb/ignorant.

 

lombardi

Footballguy
We had a kid like this in my sons pre-school class. Poor kid is allergic to everything but peanuts can kill him. We didn't mind checking stuff and not sending PBJ's to school. His mom goes to every class event, party, trip, or anything else where he is going to be around kids not in his class. They have an emergency shot in the classroom for him.I really do feel bad for the poor kid. His mom a WAY too overprotective, always hovering, never a foot from the kid. Gets this nervous panic attack look whenever another kid gets too close or touches him. He's going to have some serious issues in later life.My wife and I wonder what she's going to do when he is in later grades. She can't go to the cafeteria with him every day.I know it's wrong, and typing it I kind of feel bad about it. But when we talk about him, between ourselves out of the earshot of our kids, we refer to him as "bubble boy". Sad, but true.

 

glock

"Don't grumble, give a whistle!"
Screw that kid. I would tell my child not to give him nuts or anything like that, but I am not going to alter how my kid eats or what he/she does just because we have the equivalent to the peanut bubble boy in their class.

Home schooling should be an option for the kid I think (I am referring to the peanut freak).
Sweet. Looks like it would be secular school for your child then.
 

popeye.

Spinach Freak
Screw that kid.  I would tell my child not to give him nuts or anything like that, but I am not going to alter how my kid eats or what he/she does just because we have the equivalent to the peanut bubble boy in their class.

Home schooling should be an option for the kid I think (I am referring to the peanut freak).
You do realize that the child can die if you send your kid to school with a PB&J sandwich just to prove your point, right? Peanut allergies are usually that bad.
I'm not proving a point.The child should not be in a public environment if the risk is that great.

Why should everyone else suffer?
very :goodposting:
 

Jules Winnfield

Footballguy
I agree with the statement that this kid shouldn't be out in public at a school. Keep him at home and home school him. Question.When I was in school I never EVER remember any kid that was allergic to peanuts. I attended k-12 from 1975-1986 and I don't remember any kid ever being allergic to peanuts and if I am mistaken I remember kids having PB&J at school everyday. Did this allergy just pop up the past few years because I never heard of it til recently.

 
I feel for these parents. The hopes one has for ones children, and the concerns over their health consume parents. They don't have an easy row to hoe. They must have agonized about the risks associated with partially entrusting his welfare to 100 other families, many of whom they don't know.

 

SofaKings.

Footballguy
Wasn't this an episode on Freaks and Geeks?I have the same situation at my daughter's preschool. My daughter can't take her beloved PB&J to school but she knows it's because "Hailey might get sick". Very minor inconvenience on the scheme of things. On the other hand, I'm thinking pantagrapher would galvanize the parents to throw poor Melvin out of the program. Melvin isn't autistic or have cerbral palsy does he?

 

Capella

CAPELLODINHO
Screw that kid.  I would tell my child not to give him nuts or anything like that, but I am not going to alter how my kid eats or what he/she does just because we have the equivalent to the peanut bubble boy in their class.

Home schooling should be an option for the kid I think (I am referring to the peanut freak).
You do realize that the child can die if you send your kid to school with a PB&J sandwich just to prove your point, right? Peanut allergies are usually that bad.
I'm not proving a point.The child should not be in a public environment if the risk is that great.

Why should everyone else suffer?
:fishing: You have to be fishing. No one can be that dumb/ignorant.
Um...he's 100% correct. No way should that kid be in a school like that.
 

Nigel

Footballguy
Where were all the allergic kids when we were in prschool 20 - 30 yrs. ago? :confused: There's one of these genetic freaks in every class now.

 

zamboni

Footballguy
I don't have a problem with it. My son has been in pre-school the last few years with kids with peanut allergies, and we know several other children that have them. We just avoid sending peanut butter products to school. No biggie - there are plenty of other things to eat.It's easy to say "well, just make sure the other kids don't give the allergic kid peanut products", but with a bunch of young kids, we all know that the allergic kid could easily get a hold of a food that could severely hurt (or even kill) the kid.For those that have a problem with it, just imagine what the parents of allergic kids have to go through on a daily basis.

 
I agree with the statement that this kid shouldn't be out in public at a school. Keep him at home and home school him.

Question.

When I was in school I never EVER remember any kid that was allergic to peanuts. I attended k-12 from 1975-1986 and I don't remember any kid ever being allergic to peanuts and if I am mistaken I remember kids having PB&J at school everyday. Did this allergy just pop up the past few years because I never heard of it til recently.
In food service you are warned that certain products to extend the freshness of lettuce can be quite harmful to persons with such allergies. I learned this more than 25 years ago.Airlines began replacing peanuts as snacks for this reason more than 10 years ago.

I just can't concieve, however, of placing such a hypersensitive kid in a school with so many other kids. Seems destined for a bad end.

 

RoarinSonoran

Footballguy
Wow, talk about karma or :tinfoilhat: . I normally don't bring lunch to work, but today I brought TWO PB&Js! :DFeel free to pass that on to Melvin and the rest of the PB Nazis. :thumbup:Also, with regard to "the stare", it's less-effective if you don't look at her in situations that might bring it on. If you don't see it, she didn't do it.

 

Nigel

Footballguy
I had a lady come up to me in a public place, a freakin' arcade full of kids, when she noticed that my son had a bag of peanut M&Ms. She said "make sure your boy stays away from my boy, he's allergic to peanuts." I said "keep your kid away from my kid, my boy is not allergic." :loco:

 

roadeyes

Footballguy
Last September in my kid's Montessori class we got the same spiel about a new student. Were told to bring nothing with even a whiff of peanuts. Now this school has some of the most conscientious Type A's in the world (present party excluded), so the general belief was that the school could handle it. I was all worried because I just don't always remember stuff like that. I was sure I was going to bring some peanut-laced something when it was our kid's snack day. But I just went along silently and crossed my fingers.Well, after a week or so, several of the mommies started talking amongst themselves and realized that there was no way they could keep up with this, so of course, they went and complained.Turns out, the kid can hang with peanuts in the room, even slight amounts of peanuts are OK. So all was fine.But to expect an entire classroom to avoid all things peanut for the entire year is asking too much. #1, it's a long year.#2, once you ban peanut oil, it gets very difficult to find food that kids like and that can be prepared ahead of time. With all the typical rushing around, making arrangements, etc., no way does the room stay peanut free.

 
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If it were just keeping peanuts, PB&J sammiches, and snicker bars away from him this would not have caused that much of a blip on my radar, but to dictate what we eat at home and when, and to have us read the label of every product we or our duaghter use seems a little much.As for the book lady I am now wondering whether my daughters room might right now be filled with the wrong kind of literature. Does anybody know whether Good Night Moon, or If you give a Pig a Pancake are somehow anti-christian?

 

Kirby

Footballguy
I don't think it's a big deal to ask everyone to refrain from bringing the nuts to school.. but to ask them to check every product your child uses is too far. Also, it is a risk I wouldn't take if I was Melv's parents.

 

SofaKings.

Footballguy
If it were just keeping peanuts, PB&J sammiches, and snicker bars away from him this would not have caused that much of a blip on my radar, but to dictate what we eat at home and when, and to have us read the label of every product we or our duaghter use seems a little much.

As for the book lady I am now wondering whether my daughters room might right now be filled with the wrong kind of literature. Does anybody know whether Good Night Moon, or If you give a Pig a Pancake are somehow anti-christian?
Have them both.
 

roadeyes

Footballguy
If it were just keeping peanuts, PB&J sammiches, and snicker bars away from him this would not have caused that much of a blip on my radar, but to dictate what we eat at home and when, and to have us read the label of every product we or our duaghter use seems a little much.

As for the book lady I am now wondering whether my daughters room might right now be filled with the wrong kind of literature. Does anybody know whether Good Night Moon, or If you give a Pig a Pancake are somehow anti-christian?
Seriously?Good Night Moon and the entire "If You Give A...." series are classics. I can't imagine how they could possibly be construed as anti-christian.

Maybe because they aren't overtly christian? :shrug:

 
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dancingbones

Footballguy
Is this peanut allergy something that simply went undetected in the past and kids who had it just met a sudden death or illness? I'm curious if anyone has any theories about how this started to be a problem, and why now?As to the original post. I don't think it is unreasonable to ask other families to be aware of the problems that peanut products could cause - but ultimately it is the responsibility of the allergic child's parents (and later, of course, Melvin himself), to keep him in a peanut-free environment.For the marketing of the christian books and the disdain for all things "secular" - that would bother me more. If you don't get a good vibe from your child's pre-school, you should find another one that you're more comfortable with. .02

 
I wonder if the Wiccans have these issues in their preschools? Maybe this is some sort of Lutheran thing I hadn't heard about having been raised catholic and then having left the church upon reaching the age of reason.

 
If it were just keeping peanuts, PB&J sammiches, and snicker bars away from him this would not have caused that much of a blip on my radar, but to dictate what we eat at home and when, and to have us read the label of every product we or our duaghter use seems a little much.

As for the book lady I am now wondering whether my daughters room might right now be filled with the wrong kind of literature.  Does anybody know whether Good Night Moon, or If you give a Pig a Pancake are somehow anti-christian?
Seriously?Good Night Moon and the entire "If You Give A...." series are classics. I can't imagine how they could possibly be construed as anti-christian.

Maybe because they aren't overtly christian? :shrug:
I am rarely completely serious.
 

glumpy

breeze
I would suggest finding a normal pre-school for your daughter where kids eat playdough and the organizers wont comdemn you to hell for not buying their friends products.

Schlzm
:goodposting:
 

Koya

Footballguy
WTH is anyone doing sending there kid to such a school. Kid will start 5 steps behind humanity before they have a chance. the peanut thing is one thing - but goodness, your kid should be a good gay hating, prayer in school loving, lets pray for a SC justice to die to get more conservatives on the court winner after this indoctrination.

 

bialczabub

Lord of the Flies
This sounds like a good example of why religious institutions should not get tax-exempt status to further their beliefs in the public forum.Those peanut allergies are terrible. Kids have them in my mother's school, and they just don't keep kids' lunches in the same room. It seems unreasonable for them to tell you not to have peanut products in your lunch. I could see the chapstick request.Frankly, and sadly, I don't think that people with allergies that violent should be kept in normal classrooms. It's too much of a risk all the time, which is the way the real world is. It would seem silly for them to demand "normal" treatment when it seems obvous that they will be restricted to a highly abnormal life.

 

zamboni

Footballguy
Does anybody know whether Good Night Moon, or If you give a Pig a Pancake are somehow anti-christian?
:confused: In the great green room

There was a telephone

And a red balloon

And a picture of -

The cow jumping over the moon

And there were three little bears sitting on chairs

And two little kittens

And a pair of mittens

And a little toyhouse

And a young mouse

And a comb and a brush and a bowl full of mush

And a quiet old lady whispering hush

Goodnight room

Goodnight moon

Goodnight cow jumping over the moon

Goodnight light and the red balloon

Goodnight bears

Goodnight chairs

Goodnight kittens

And goodnight mittens

Goodnight clocks and goodnight socks

Goodnight little house and goodnight mouse

Goodnight comb and goodnight brush

Goodnight nobody, goodnight mush

And goodnight to the old lady whispering “hush”

Goonight stars

Goodnight air

Goodnight noises everywhere.

---------------------------------

I would alert the religious authorities right away ;)

 

glock

"Don't grumble, give a whistle!"
I don't have a problem with it.

My son has been in pre-school the last few years with kids with peanut allergies, and we know several other children that have them. We just avoid sending peanut butter products to school. No biggie - there are plenty of other things to eat.

It's easy to say "well, just make sure the other kids don't give the allergic kid peanut products", but with a bunch of young kids, we all know that the allergic kid could easily get a hold of a food that could severely hurt (or even kill) the kid.

For those that have a problem with it, just imagine what the parents of allergic kids have to go through on a daily basis.
Are you asking for a little empathy here? :lmao:

Tough crowd here.

 

Mrs DaVinci

Footballguy
I would do my best to not send in PBJ's etc, but you can only do so much. As far as accidents are concerned, I'ld hope that the parents have an epi-pen at the school so that Melvin would not die if he was exposed to peanut or peanut products.... :)

 

bialczabub

Lord of the Flies
Is this peanut allergy something that simply went undetected in the past and kids who had it just met a sudden death or illness? I'm curious if anyone has any theories about how this started to be a problem, and why now?

As to the original post. I don't think it is unreasonable to ask other families to be aware of the problems that peanut products could cause - but ultimately it is the responsibility of the allergic child's parents (and later, of course, Melvin himself), to keep him in a peanut-free environment.

For the marketing of the christian books and the disdain for all things "secular" - that would bother me more.

If you don't get a good vibe from your child's pre-school, you should find another one that you're more comfortable with. .02
I've thought the same thing about the peanut allergy. from wikipedia:
For reasons that are not understood, food allergies have become more common in Western nations in recent times. (This trend seems to apply to asthma as well.) In the United States, it is believe that about 4% of the population suffers from food allergies. In children, this number is believed to be significantly higher.

The most common food allergens include peanuts, milk, eggs, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, soy, and wheat - these foods account for about 90% of all allergic reactions.
then there's this theory:
Some recent research has also begun to show that some kinds of common parasites, such as intestinal worms (e.g. hookworms), secrete immunosuppressant chemicals into the gut wall and hence the bloodstream which prevent the body from attacking the parasite. This gives rise to a new slant on the hygiene hypothesis - that co-evolution of man and parasites has in the past led to an immune system that only functions correctly in the presence of the parasites. Without them, the immune system becomes unbalanced and oversensitive. Gutworms and similar parasites are present in untreated drinking water in undeveloped countries, and in developed countries until the routine chlorination and purification of drinking water supplies. This also coincides with the time period in which a significant rise in allergies has been observed. So far, there is only sporadic evidence to support this hypothesis - one scientist who suffered from seasonal allergic rhinitis (hayfever) infected himself with gutworms and was immediately 'cured' of his allergy with no other ill effects. Full clinical trials have yet to be performed however. It may be that the term 'parasite' could turn out to be inappropriate, and in fact a hitherto unsuspected symbiosis is at work.
and finally:
One theory that has been gaining strength is the "hygiene hypothesis". This theory maintains that since children in more affluent countries are leading a cleaner and cleaner life (less exposure to dirt, extra use of disinfectants, etc), their immune systems have less exposure to parasites and other pathogens than children in other countries or in decades past. Their immune systems may, therefore, have many "loaded guns", cells which might have targeted, say, the intestinal worms that no longer cause trouble in affluent neighbourhoods. Having no reasonable target, these cells inadvertently become activated by environmental antigens that might only cause minor reactions in others. It is the symptoms of this exaggerated response that is seen as the allergic reaction.

Many common allergies such as asthma have seen huge increases in the years since the second world war, and many studies appear to show a correlation between this and the increasingly affluent and clean lifestyles in the west. This is supported by studies in less developed countries that do not enjoy western levels of cleanliness, and similarly do not show western levels of incidences of asthma and other allergies. During this same period, air quality, at one time considered the "obvious" cause of asthma, has shown a considerable improvement. This has led some researchers to conclude that it is our "too clean" upbringing that is to blame for the lack of immune system stimulation in early childhood.

So far the evidence to support this theory is limited.

Another theory is the exponential use and abuse of chemicals in affluent nations since the second world war. Vast numbers of chemicals are introduced into our indoor and outdoor environments with little or no testing regarding their toxicity to living beings. Many believe that air quality is getting worse rather than better, particularly if one considers indoor air quality as well as outdoor. (Indoor air quality has become significantly worse since building codes changed in the 1970s to make buildings more air-tight to conserve energy. This affects buildings built since that time.) Adverse reactions to toxins vary considerably from one person to another, and can involve extremes in symptoms including the neurological and endocrine systems as well as the more commonly recognized allergy symptoms listed above.

In 2004, a joint Swedish-Danish research team (Bornehag et al.) found a very strong link between allergies in children and the phthalates DEHP and BBzP, commonly used in PVC.

Allergies are also viewed by some medical practitioners as a negative consequence of the use and abuse of antibiotics and vaccinations. This mainstream Western approach to treatment and prevention of infectious disease has been used in the more affluent world for a longer period of time than in the rest of the world, hence the much greater commonality of allergies there. It is hypothesized that use of antibiotics and vaccination affect the immune system, and that allergies are a dysfunctional immune response. There is, however, very little evidence to support this view.
 

zamboni

Footballguy
I don't have a problem with it.

My son has been in pre-school the last few years with kids with peanut allergies, and we know several other children that have them. We just avoid sending peanut butter products to school. No biggie - there are plenty of other things to eat.

It's easy to say "well, just make sure the other kids don't give the allergic kid peanut products", but with a bunch of young kids, we all know that the allergic kid could easily get a hold of a food that could severely hurt (or even kill) the kid.

For those that have a problem with it, just imagine what the parents of allergic kids have to go through on a daily basis.
Are you asking for a little empathy here? :lmao:

Tough crowd here.
I'm not the one whose son has the allergies, but yes, as a parent, I do have empathy for those parents whose kids do.
 
The religious nature of the preschool is irrelevant to us. The school is close, clean, and extemely well accredited. If she draws noah's arc and creche scenes with her crayons I am fine with that. Beats drawing Barney.One mornig a week she will also be attending a preschool associated with a temple. Why? because it is an excellent school and again the religious indocrtination is minimal at that age. Our daughter has never been in any form of daycare or pre-schooling before so perhaps I am just too much of a rookie. Perhaps these types of issues are more common than I know.

 
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Schlzm

Footballguy
My theory is that Clorox an dLysol will singlehandedly destroy western society by over sterilization. Kids today are wusses. I'm also a little confused by the schools stance on the peanut issue. With their obvious ultra religious condemning ways they seem to embrace the "It takes a villiage" mentality quite readily. Maybe you should tell them that Hillary would be proud and see if they backpeddle their requests? Could be an interesting social / religious experiment. Schlzm

 

glock

"Don't grumble, give a whistle!"
I don't have a problem with it.

My son has been in pre-school the last few years with kids with peanut allergies, and we know several other children that have them. We just avoid sending peanut butter products to school. No biggie - there are plenty of other things to eat.

It's easy to say "well, just make sure the other kids don't give the allergic kid peanut products", but with a bunch of young kids, we all know that the allergic kid could easily get a hold of a food that could severely hurt (or even kill) the kid.

For those that have a problem with it, just imagine what the parents of allergic kids have to go through on a daily basis.
Are you asking for a little empathy here? :lmao:

Tough crowd here.
Empathy is fine.I feel bad for the kid and the parents to deal with that.

But asking others to go out of their way for one child is too much.
Why is it too much? Curious. What defines too much for you?I think for the kid to be born with this syndrom to be too much. For you, it's watching that your child doesn't bring peanut based products to school.

Nothing like a little perspective.

 

Mrs DaVinci

Footballguy
The religious nature of the preschool is irrelevant to us. The school is close, clean, and extemely well accredited. If she draws noah's arc and creche scenes with her crayons I am fine with that. Beats drawing Barney.

One mornig a week she will also be attending a preschool associated with a temple. Why? because it is an excellent school and again the religious indocrtination is minimal at that age.

Our daughter has never been in any form of daycare or pre-schooling before so perhaps I am just too much of a rookie. Perhaps these types of issues are more common than I know.
I think you are going to run into this a lot now that you are in the system. I had never heard of it until I put my 3 year olds into a similiar program. Now I hear about it every year.
 
The religious nature of the preschool is irrelevant to us.  The school is close, clean, and extemely well accredited.  If she draws noah's arc and creche scenes with her crayons I am fine with that.  Beats drawing Barney.

One mornig  a week she will also be attending a preschool associated with a temple.  Why? because it is an excellent school and again the religious indocrtination is minimal at that age. 

Our daughter has never been in any form of daycare or pre-schooling before so perhaps I am just too much of a rookie. Perhaps these types of issues are more common than I know.
I think you are going to run into this a lot now that you are in the system. I had never heard of it until I put my 3 year olds into a similiar program. Now I hear about it every year.
Serves me right for having kids at my advanced years. 20 some years ago this was not an issue, at least not one I remember.
 

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