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Middle Aged Dummies!! Artists #1's have been posted!! (5 Viewers)

adding to my sleep playlist
what's this now?

My spotify playlist for when I'm high and go to bed.
I have one of these that’s never been particularly worked on or fleshed out. I’d be interested in checking yours out. My contribution to the cause—- Brad’s Shame is a long time go-to for sleepy time. I think the first time I ever slept on a plane was assisted by this

I don’t know what it is about fn Cheez-Its and being stoned. So good.

I’ve liked about half of Phish, some catchy hooks in those big jams, I’d put them with Sigur, sometimes a little too much for my instant gratificationy ears
 
31. "Strobe" is an iconic electronic dance music (EDM) track produced by the Canadian artist Deadmau5, whose real name is Joel Zimmerman. Released in 2009, the song is considered one of Deadmau5's most influential and critically acclaimed works. Clocking in at over 10 minutes, "Strobe" is known for its progressive house style, mesmerizing melodies, and atmospheric soundscapes. The song's title, "Strobe," refers to the euphoric and hypnotic effect created by its pulsating beats and dazzling synths, which resonate with club-goers and music enthusiasts alike. The track's euphoric drops and ethereal breakdowns have made it a staple in dance music culture, often being played during peak moments of DJ sets or at music festivals. With its seamless blending of euphoria and introspection, "Strobe" remains a timeless masterpiece in the electronic music realm and a definitive highlight of Deadmau5's prolific career.

30. "4ware" is a captivating electronic track produced by Deadmau5, released in 2016. The song showcases Deadmau5's signature progressive and melodic style, combining intricate sound design and rhythmic patterns to create an immersive listening experience. With a runtime of over 8 minutes, "4ware" draws listeners into a dreamlike world with its uplifting and euphoric melodies. The track's intro sets a serene atmosphere, gradually introducing layers of synths and textures that build in complexity as the song progresses. "4ware" exhibits a sense of wonder and nostalgia, evoking emotions of joy and introspection, often making it a favorite among fans of Deadmau5's more emotive works. Throughout the song, Deadmau5 showcases his production prowess, utilizing intricate soundscapes and harmonies to create a lush and immersive sonic landscape. The infectious rhythm and captivating melodies make "4ware" a standout piece in Deadmau5's discography, appealing to both dedicated fans and newcomers to electronic music. In summary, "4ware" is a beautifully crafted electronic track that captures the essence of Deadmau5's musical style, blending uplifting melodies, intricate production, and an evocative atmosphere into a mesmerizing journey for the ears.

29. "Ghosts 'n' Stuff" is an immensely popular electronic dance track released by Deadmau5 in 2009. The song features vocals from Rob Swire, the frontman of the Australian drum and bass band Pendulum. It became one of Deadmau5's most recognizable and commercially successful works. The song effortlessly blends elements of progressive house and electro house, creating a high-energy and infectious dancefloor anthem. "Ghosts 'n' Stuff" opens with a catchy and memorable synth riff, setting the tone for the entire track. Rob Swire's captivating vocals add a haunting and introspective layer to the song's upbeat production. The lyrics touch upon themes of facing one's fears, confronting inner "ghosts," and finding strength to move forward. With its explosive drops, pulsating beats, and addictive melodies, "Ghosts 'n' Stuff" quickly became a staple in both mainstream and underground electronic music scenes. It received widespread radio play and earned Deadmau5 significant recognition beyond the electronic music community. The song's title, a playful reference to ghosts and supernatural phenomena, aligns with Deadmau5's penchant for incorporating whimsical and mysterious elements into his music and visual branding. Overall, "Ghosts 'n' Stuff" stands as a timeless classic, symbolizing Deadmau5's talent for crafting memorable and captivating dance tracks that resonate with audiences worldwide. Its infectious energy and catchy melodies continue to make it a go-to choice for DJs and a fan favorite in live performances.

28. "Right This Second" is a dynamic electronic masterpiece by Deadmau5, released in 2010. The track exemplifies Deadmau5's signature progressive house style while pushing the boundaries of sonic exploration and innovation. Opening with a mesmerizing arpeggiated melody, "Right This Second" immediately captivates listeners with its hypnotic and rhythmic energy. The song's title suggests an urgency, which is reflected in its high-tempo beats and pulsating bassline that keeps the momentum driving forward. Throughout the track, Deadmau5 showcases his expert production skills, crafting a seamless fusion of intricate sound design and captivating harmonies. The song exhibits a sense of constant movement, with layers of synths and textures building upon each other, creating an immersive and evolving sonic landscape. As the song progresses, it unleashes a euphoric and uplifting atmosphere, leaving the listener on an exhilarating musical high. The infectious energy and infectious melodies make "Right This Second" a favorite among both dedicated fans of electronic music and newcomers to the genre. Released as part of his fifth studio album "4x4=12," "Right This Second" solidified Deadmau5's status as a leading force in the electronic dance music scene. Its distinctive sound and infectious rhythms have made it a popular choice for DJs and continue to earn it praise and recognition within the electronic music community. In summary, "Right This Second" is a testament to Deadmau5's artistry and ability to create unforgettable electronic experiences. With its pulsating energy, mesmerizing melodies, and meticulous production, the track remains a timeless gem in Deadmau5's illustrious discography.

27. "Seeya" is a captivating electronic track by Deadmau5, featuring the vocal talents of Colleen D'Agostino, released in 2014. The song blends Deadmau5's signature progressive house style with emotive vocals, creating a captivating and emotionally resonant musical journey. Opening with lush atmospheric elements, "Seeya" sets a dreamlike and introspective tone. Colleen D'Agostino's haunting and ethereal vocals add a layer of emotion and vulnerability to the track, drawing listeners into its evocative narrative. As the song progresses, Deadmau5's masterful production skills take center stage, weaving together intricate melodies, pulsating beats, and rich textures. "Seeya" is a song that tugs at the heartstrings, exploring themes of longing, connection, and the complexity of human relationships. It strikes a balance between melancholy and euphoria, creating a bittersweet yet uplifting experience for the listener. Released as part of his seventh studio album "while(1<2)," "Seeya" received critical acclaim and further solidified Deadmau5's reputation as a versatile and emotive producer within the electronic music community. With its captivating vocals, intricate production, and evocative atmosphere, "Seeya" remains a standout piece in Deadmau5's extensive discography.

26. "Some Chords" is a high-energy and influential electronic track by Deadmau5, released in 2010. The song exemplifies Deadmau5's mastery of progressive house and his ability to craft infectious melodies that resonate with audiences worldwide. The track's title, "Some Chords," is a playful nod to its composition, which revolves around a series of captivating chord progressions. The song wastes no time in grabbing the listener's attention, immediately immersing them in a pulsating and rhythmic sonic landscape. "Some Chords" is characterized by its dynamic and relentless energy, with a driving bassline and infectious synth hooks that keep the momentum going throughout the track. The cleverly layered production builds upon itself, creating an ever-evolving soundscape that keeps listeners engaged from start to finish. As with many of Deadmau5's works, "Some Chords" showcases his exceptional talent for sound design and arranging elements in a way that feels both euphoric and hypnotic. Its lively and uplifting nature has made it a staple in dance music sets and a favorite among DJs and fans alike. Released as part of his fifth studio album "4x4=12," "Some Chords" played a significant role in solidifying Deadmau5's reputation as one of the most influential and forward-thinking producers in the electronic music scene. In summary, "Some Chords" is a testament to Deadmau5's artistry and skill in crafting infectious and captivating electronic dance music. Its relentless energy, memorable melodies, and expertly crafted chord progressions have earned it a lasting place as one of Deadmau5's most celebrated tracks.
 
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25. "Slip" is an electrifying and atmospheric electronic track by Deadmau5, released in 2008. The song showcases Deadmau5's distinctive progressive house style, characterized by its intricate sound design and captivating melodies. The track "Slip" begins with an otherworldly and mysterious ambiance, setting the stage for the mesmerizing journey that follows. As the song progresses, it gradually builds in intensity, introducing layers of pulsating beats, lush synths, and hypnotic textures. One of the standout features of "Slip" is Deadmau5's skillful use of soundscapes, which transport the listener into a dreamlike and immersive sonic experience. The carefully crafted arrangement creates a sense of constant motion and fluidity, keeping the energy dynamic and engaging. Released as part of his third studio album "Random Album Title," "Slip" contributed to Deadmau5's growing reputation as an innovative and genre-defining electronic music producer. The title "Slip" may evoke the idea of slipping into another realm or state of mind, which aligns with the track's ethereal and introspective qualities. Like many of Deadmau5's works, "Slip" blends an evocative atmosphere with infectious rhythms, resulting in a unique and unforgettable sonic journey. "Slip" is a captivating and atmospheric electronic track that showcases Deadmau5's talent for crafting immersive soundscapes and infectious melodies. Its mystical ambiance and dynamic energy make it a standout piece in Deadmau5's diverse discography, leaving a lasting impression on listeners.

24. "The 16th Hour" is a mesmerizing and progressive electronic track by Deadmau5, released in 2009. The song demonstrates Deadmau5's prowess as a masterful producer, combining intricate sound design with a captivating arrangement. The title "The 16th Hour" suggests a moment of reflection or a specific time within the day, hinting at the track's introspective and contemplative nature. The song opens with a haunting and ambient intro, drawing listeners into a hypnotic soundscape from the very start. As the track unfolds, Deadmau5 skillfully layers pulsating beats, ethereal synths, and subtle melodies, creating a sense of gradual progression and evolution. "The 16th Hour" stands out for its intricate arrangement, carefully designed to immerse the listener in a state of entrancing musical exploration. Released as part of his fourth studio album "For Lack of a Better Name," the track solidified Deadmau5's reputation as a trailblazer in the electronic dance music scene, with a penchant for pushing the boundaries of sonic innovation. "The 16th Hour" showcases Deadmau5's ability to craft deeply immersive and emotive electronic music that transcends conventional genres. The song's atmospheric and evocative qualities make it a favorite among both dedicated fans and new listeners to Deadmau5's music. In summary, "The 16th Hour" is a captivating and introspective electronic track that exemplifies Deadmau5's talent for crafting intricate soundscapes. Its haunting melodies, ethereal textures, and progressive arrangement contribute to its status as a standout piece in Deadmau5's diverse discography, leaving a lasting impression on those who listen to it.

23. "Not Exactly" is a mesmerizing and influential progressive house track by Deadmau5, released in 2008. The song exemplifies Deadmau5's signature style, combining intricate melodies, lush soundscapes, and infectious beats. The title "Not Exactly" reflects Deadmau5's playful and enigmatic approach to both his music and persona. The track opens with a captivating and euphoric synth riff that immediately draws listeners into its hypnotic allure. As the song progresses, "Not Exactly" builds upon its initial melody, layering intricate sound design and rhythmic elements to create a sense of continuous evolution and momentum. Deadmau5's masterful production skills are on full display, as he weaves together a rich and immersive sonic tapestry. Released as a single, "Not Exactly" quickly gained popularity and became one of Deadmau5's most celebrated tracks. Its infectious energy and emotive qualities have made it a favorite among electronic music enthusiasts and have earned it frequent play at festivals and dance events. The track's combination of uplifting melodies and captivating textures showcases Deadmau5's ability to craft music that resonates on both an emotional and danceable level. "Not Exactly" remains a timeless gem in Deadmau5's extensive discography, loved by fans new and old. In summary, "Not Exactly" is a mesmerizing and influential progressive house track that showcases Deadmau5's skill as a producer and his ability to create immersive and emotive electronic music. Its infectious energy, intricate sound design, and captivating melodies have solidified its place as one of Deadmau5's most cherished and acclaimed works.

22. "Superliminal" is a mind-bending and experimental electronic track by Deadmau5, released in 2012. The song showcases Deadmau5's penchant for pushing the boundaries of sound design and arrangement, creating a unique and immersive sonic experience. The title "Superliminal" is a clever wordplay, referencing the concept of "subliminal" messages while emphasizing something beyond the usual or expected. The track lives up to its name, immediately catching the listener's attention with its unconventional and mesmerizing sounds. From the start, "Superliminal" features an intriguing and disorienting intro, setting the stage for a journey through layers of intricate beats, glitchy effects, and unexpected twists. The track's experimental nature challenges traditional song structures, keeping the listener engaged and guessing what comes next. Released as part of Deadmau5's sixth studio album "Album Title Goes Here," "Superliminal" solidified his reputation as an innovative and boundary-pushing electronic music producer. The track's hypnotic and complex composition, combined with Deadmau5's meticulous production, has made it a favorite among fans of his more experimental works. "Superliminal" showcases Deadmau5's willingness to explore new sonic territories, making it a standout piece in his diverse discography. In summary, "Superliminal" is a mind-bending and experimental electronic track that exemplifies Deadmau5's creativity and willingness to break away from the norm. Its disorienting sounds, intricate arrangement, and unexpected twists create an immersive and unique listening experience that captivates and challenges the listener's perception of electronic music.

21. "There Might Be Coffee" is an invigorating and uplifting progressive house track by Deadmau5, released in 2012. The song is a testament to Deadmau5's ability to craft infectious melodies and intricate arrangements that leave a lasting impact on listeners. The title "There Might Be Coffee" is a playful and whimsical reference to one of Deadmau5's quirky and humorous Twitter posts. It reflects his lighthearted approach to both his music and interactions with fans. The track opens with a catchy and upbeat melody, immediately setting a positive and energetic tone. As the song progresses, Deadmau5 introduces layers of pulsating beats, uplifting synths, and captivating soundscapes, creating a sense of constant motion and excitement. "There Might Be Coffee" stands out for its vibrant and joyous atmosphere, evoking a feeling of optimism and adventure. The track's seamless fusion of melodic elements and rhythmic prowess showcases Deadmau5's expertise in creating dancefloor anthems. Released as part of his sixth studio album "Album Title Goes Here," the song further solidified Deadmau5's status as a leading figure in the electronic dance music scene. Its infectious energy and uplifting spirit have made "There Might Be Coffee" a fan favorite, earning frequent play in his live performances and contributing to its status as a beloved track among his diverse discography. In summary, "There Might Be Coffee" is an invigorating and uplifting progressive house track that exemplifies Deadmau5's talent for crafting infectious melodies and captivating arrangements. Its vibrant energy and positive vibes make it a standout piece in Deadmau5's illustrious career, leaving listeners with a sense of euphoria and joy.

20. "Mercedes" is an electrifying and progressive electronic track by Deadmau5, released in 2014. The song demonstrates Deadmau5's skill for immersing the listener into a modern progressive house experience. The song opens with a mixture of ambient arpeggios, setting the scene mentally with both the catchy phrasal melody and the background noise. As the track unfolds, Deadmau5 skillfully layers pulsating kick beats, resolving basslines and uplifting synths, creating a sense of gradual progression and evolution. Released as part of his seventh studio album "while(1<2)," "Mercedes" showcases Deadmau5's ability to craft deeply immersive and progressive electronic music that uplifts the listener into mental soundscapes of his design. The song's atmospheric and pulsating qualities make it a favorite among both dedicated fans and new listeners to Deadmau5's music. "Mercedes" is a captivating and introspective electronic track that exemplifies Deadmau5's talent for crafting intricate soundscapes. Its persistent melodies, ethereal textures, and progressive arrangement contribute to its status as a standout piece in Deadmau5's diverse discography.
 
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There’s a tiny piece of some Sesame Street sketch in my head, where various muppets are being pressed or smacked in some way and making a sound like that

I could be making it up

Talking about cuica not deadmau5

There have been a few of his that have caught me and I noticed he has a song called The Veldt!
 
There’s a tiny piece of some Sesame Street sketch in my head, where various muppets are being pressed or smacked in some way and making a sound like that

I could be making it up

Talking about cuica not deadmau5

There have been a few of his that have caught me and I noticed he has a song called The Veldt!
you'll see The Veldt at some point
 
There’s a tiny piece of some Sesame Street sketch in my head, where various muppets are being pressed or smacked in some way and making a sound like that

I could be making it up

Talking about cuica not deadmau5

There have been a few of his that have caught me and I noticed he has a song called The Veldt!
you'll see The Veldt at some point

@scorchy tells this story better than I do, and it’s pretty early for storytelling, but we once saw a band called The Veldt
 
@scorchy tells this story better than I do, and it’s pretty early for storytelling, but we once saw a band called The Veldt

Perhaps we can coax it out of you two.
It’s not much of a story. They had a boombox in lieu of a drummer. I figured they must have been the fourth biggest black rock band of the Living Colour era (maybe not, what do I know). They were good, we were fully engaged, but we could never remember what they were called until he figured it out

eta- if the link doesn’t work I’ll have to fix it on the laptop

DuckDuckGo has been messing w me lately
 
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if the link doesn’t work I’ll have to fix it on the laptop

Link works. Good story. Actually, the thoroughness of it is what got me. That and scorchy had Google tracked himself for ten or so years. Difference between being a slightly illegal person and not? Turning those services off whenever they ask you if you want to be tracked.

Such was my former life.

On another note, that thread was an enjoyable re-read on the page you linked to. Had Ramsay Hunt Experience talking about the Mr. T Experience. Good stuff.
 
The Decemberists
#19 June Hymn


The second selection from 2011's The King Is Dead, June Hymn just missed being timely by 4 days 😥
(Can't argue with the release timing of these playlists; maybe I should have ranked it lower? Nah.)

Decemberists frontman Colin Meloy moved to a rural location north of Portland, Oregon in late 2009 with his wife and young son. Meloy penned this song chronicling the changing of seasons just as the snow was meting during the first spring that he and his family spent in their new home. "It sounds so hokey, but it was just about sitting out there," Meloy told The Guardian nodding towards the view out over rich green woodland. "I think I was just really attached to this area, coming out of that winter and seeing how that environment changed every month, learning more about your surroundings, just kind of watching and witnessing what happens over the course of the seasons.

Here's a hymn to welcome in the day
Heralding a summer's early sway
And all the bulbs all comin' in
To begin
The thrushes' bleeding battle with the wrens
Disrupts my reverie again


The song features a harmonica intro played by Meloy. It was the first time the Decemberists frontman had picked up the instrument in years. "I thought it'd be fun to try again," he told Spin magazine. "Adding a harmonica — it has a rank-and-file sort of 80's cow-punk thing to it. That was a nice color to add."
 
I agree with most of this....although I like Doolittle and Surfer Rosa a bit more

Yeah, my love of this is because of its newness to me at the time. I borrowed and it dubbed it on cassette (back when scarcity of music was a real thing!) from this guy who was into music I liked, and I wore that thing out my freshman fall of college. He had Trompe Le Monde and the Bosstones on one ninety minute cassette (Devil's Night Out) and I was hooked on both. So I have attachments to the album from the process of getting it and being young. It probably isn't better than Doolittle or Surfer Rosa for fans already into those two albums.
Was thinking about this last night and I don't completely remember exactly why Trompe Le Monde didn't hit for me and haven't really ever re-visited, but I have a few theories:

1) Way too much Frank, not nearly enough Kim.

2) I was all-in on the Pixies from the jump after hearing about Come on Pilgrim on 120 Minutes. I loved Surfer Rosa and Doolittle (even though all my Zep/Dead-loving HS friends rolled their eyes) and Bossanova - though a couple of steps back - still has a couple of my favorite songs. Maybe I was just done with them by 1991? Or maybe blame it on Nevermind?

3) I hate, hate, hate the JaMC cover. Head On is one of the few songs that brings on a pure sense of euphoria for me (it's an odd bunch that also includes School of Fish) and the cover getting more play than the original just angered my 19 year-old brain.

All that said, I'll give it another listen once this thread kicks the bucket.
 

Link works. Good story. Actually, the thoroughness of it is what got me. That and scorchy had Google tracked himself for ten or so years. Difference between being a slightly illegal person and not? Turning those services off whenever they ask you if you want to be tracked.
I'm nothing if not thorough. Drives most everyone else in my life a little nutty though.

So, if asked - which you're didn't - I can expound on the joys of Google location services for days. Just last weekend, Jen and I were disagreeing on whether we'd already been to a certain Chicago restaurant so I pulled up Google Maps and, boom, all the evidence from 6 years prior was right there. Or if I want to find my pics of the Matterhorn, zoom in on Zermatt on the map and all the details plus pics emerge. It's an amazing tool for those of us with failing memories.

As for the illegal stuff, I figure my phone is tracking me anyway, so what the hell.
 
Had a chance to listen closer to the last couple playlists.

21s:
Again, the Brandi Carlile song kicked ***. I had to listen to that one a few times.
Warren Zevon has been one I've been on the edge of, but this one really hit. Solo is great
Another Blur song that I added. Not a band I paid attention to besides their hits, but I've liked a few here, and I remember one or two popping up in the GPs that I liked as well.
**** me, that groove on Midnight Cruiser. Another I listened to multiple times. I think the 8 year old said something about adding it to her playlist.
Speaking of her, I think ELO is becoming one of her most played artist or most added to her playlist. She also still listens to her Sun Studio playlist a fair amount.

20s:
I think the theme in this one was amazing surprises by bands I thought I mostly knew.

Middletown Dreams - love the 80s synth and feel here (to be fair it starts to overpower Geddy's voice, so that could be part of it ;) ), but great work from the trio here. Especially the love the last 1:30 from the rhythm section. I THOUGHT I had listened to all of Rush, but when I clicked on Power Windows, I didn't recognize a song besides Manhattan Project, so I think I missed this mid-80s output.
Iron Eagle!!! I've heard this song dozens of times, mostly from watching that dumb movie too many times in my youth, but I had 0 clue that was a Queen song. I've been naturally digging through Queens' albums as I realize in drafts and GPs how much I dig them, but I'm still being shown some great phases/sounds from them I hadn't gotten to yet.
Heart - holy, **** - where did this come from? I thought I saw a post stating as much, but I had to verify that indeed this was from the last 20 years. Bluesy groove with a bit of Robert Plant upper end mixed with 90s alternative guitar? However you describe it, it was awesome.
Red Giant I'm not keeping a top 10 or anything but this one might be one of my favorites of the countdown so far. Speaking of verifying, I had to make sure this wasn't some b-sides I missed in the 90s, as I thought I was listening to Layne a bit. Loved everything about this.


General thoughts/rambles:

As we have been going, I've been noticing and writing down albums that I am gravitating towards. Even playlists that I am not 100% clicking with there are albums forming that I've liked a couple songs from or at least liked the sound more from. Prodigy is one of these, as I've liked the songs off Always Outnumbered more and I've realized that I slept on 21st Century Breakdown from Green Day. Some I will wait to listen to until after the draft, but others I will sprinkle in as we are going. Power Windows is one I will listen to soon. I liked the back to back Bruce selections from born in the U.S.A., but when I was thinking his music it seems to be that I like the sentiment of his songs or the feeling of nostalgia they give me more than I do the actual songs if that makes sense. That applies to these two, and my preference of his songs is the darker stuff like State Trooper. Tonight, Tonight, Tonight was always my favorite from Invisivible Touch. I love the whole song, but I weirdly play 5:00 - 5:10 over and over. Walk is one of my favorite Foos we've had so far, and it hit me nicely this weekend as it as one of those general choruses that you could apply to your situation. I don't feel like I knew the song, but it also has that very Foo feel to it, so I'm not sure. I think I've listened to Wasting Light at least once, or it could have been more ubiquitous than I realized.
 
Maybe I was just done with them by 1991? Or maybe blame it on Nevermind?

This happens to me with bands. Ironically, I never loved Nirvana's Nevermind, even though I'd been following that Seattle scene for a couple of years when it came out. I was just done with most of it (besides Mudhoney). So it all comes full circle, I guess. Just done with it for no real reason other than you're always evolving and changing and things don't fit the current program.
 
Maybe I was just done with them by 1991? Or maybe blame it on Nevermind?

This happens to me with bands. Ironically, I never loved Nirvana's Nevermind, even though I'd been following that Seattle scene for a couple of years when it came out. I was just done with most of it (besides Mudhoney). So it all comes full circle, I guess. Just done with it for no real reason other than you're always evolving and changing and things don't fit the current program.
Honestly, I never loved Nevermind either. When my much cooler friend Kyle bought it on the day it came out and came over to our dorm to listen, my first reaction was "Sounds like the Pixies." Not exactly a controversial opinion, I guess. Bob just said, "Bahhh", pressed rewind, then picked up his guitar and played along to ...Teen Spirit after only hearing it once.
 
Nirvana was my least favorite of the core Seattle bands as well. Didn't hate them, just didn't get universal praise they got. I was coming from more metal before the early 90s, so I think I clung to the heavier sound from Soundgarden and Alice In Chains more. Pearl Jam grew on me later and I was a big fan during Vs./Vitalogy. Of those bands I listen to Soundgarden and PJ by far the most still (soon to be replaced by Dino ;) ), and I still don't fully click with Nirvana.
 
I thought I might do a live listen/track commentary, at the risk of being too brutally honest with my opinions, if we got a new playlist this morning.
That would be fun.

It would be awesome to have a MAD cornhole and listen to one of these playlists for the first time with you all. Probably harder to stick to the Thumper Rule when we see each other's real reactions, though. ;)
 
I thought I might do a live listen/track commentary, at the risk of being too brutally honest with my opinions, if we got a new playlist this morning.
That would be fun.

It would be awesome to have a MAD cornhole and listen to one of these playlists for the first time with you all. Probably harder to stick to the Thumper Rule when we see each other's real reactions, though. ;)
This might be a good exercise in diplomacy. In person my face would give me away :lol:
 
I thought I might do a live listen/track commentary, at the risk of being too brutally honest with my opinions, if we got a new playlist this morning.
That would be fun.

It would be awesome to have a MAD cornhole and listen to one of these playlists for the first time with you all. Probably harder to stick to the Thumper Rule when we see each other's real reactions, though. ;)
This might be a good exercise in diplomacy. In person my face would give me away :lol:
There would be a lot of polite bathroom breaks. :lol:
 
Tip of the cap to @tuffnutt
Great timing on Elliot Smith's Independence Day! Great tune as well. Nice addition to 1998 - Disrupt the whole scene :thumbup:
Look at this teacher's pet doing starting on the lesson early. ;)

I had to laugh when I saw that as I was loading the playlist.
I was up at 0 dark hundred and had already listened to the 20s. Twice and then some.
I was going to offer, but forgot. I have the ability to post his usual post, and I have the playlist obviously - I could do them if he is busy. I didn't want to step on toes, though.
 
I thought Nirvana would be a flash in the pan, for a while, until they weren't.

To me Pearl Jam and especially Soundgarden had a lot more heft.

Against all odds I somehow still have my tickets to the Nirvana show in London the day after he died.
Thumper Rule for me on Pearl Jam. The others are at least boring (I mean that in the best possible way).
 
I mean, the top of my pecking order for "90s Seattle bands" is hopefully revealed from my artist selection.
That said, I listen(ed) to a lot of Soundgarden also, and would put them second on that list. Other than Ten, Pearl Jam proved hit-or-miss for me. Nirvana was always a like more than a love. Obviously full credit for their Unplugged performance.
 
ELO - Don't Bring Me Down

Their highest charting hit, and the one heavy rock song on the otherwise disco-influenced Discovery album. If I were doing a real countdown it'd be top 3, but enjoy it here.

Of course it's ELO, so there has to be a little something "off" in the song - in this case, the made up word "grooos" in the chorus.
I know it’s wrong, but I refuse to budge from “bruce” as I first heard it.
 
Regarding 90s Seattle bands, here is my top 5 in order:
  1. Pearl Jam - one of my top 5 all time bands
  2. Temple of the Dog - incredible mashup of Pearl Jam and Soundgarden
  3. Soundgarden
  4. Alice in Chains
  5. Nirvana - but I like Nirvana a lot, which shows how much talent there was in Seattle in the 90s
Sad that the lead singer / frontman for each of the last 3 bands died early. Plus, TOTD was formed as a tribute to another Seattle lead singer, Andrew Wood.
 
Regarding 90s Seattle bands, here is my top five in order

1. Mudhoney
2. Nirvana
3. The Fastbacks
4. Love Battery
5. Green River or Mother Love Bone

Actually, make The Fastbacks number one on the strength of Zücker alone.

eta* You can tell that a lot of pain, sweat, and blood went into this list.

eta2* Considering Hole, AIC, Pearl Jam, and L7 (and otb's favorite, Babes In Toyland) don't even make the list, that's a fertile as heck scene, now that I think about it for more than a second.

eta3* Make The Dancing French Liberals Of '48 the number one band and bump the Fastbacks down to second. Move Mudhoney to third, Nirvana to fourth, and Love Battery to fifth. Invoke the mercy rule after and I'm only letting my pitchers pitch to one batter and then I want lefty-lefty match-ups all the way down for the rest of the game.

eta4* Then take out Nirvana and replace with Hole, because that's the way the cookie crumbled.

Lisztomania:

1. Dancing French Liberals Of '48
2. The Fastbacks
3. Mudhoney
4. Nirvana Hole
5. Love Battery

And Olympia had a bunch of bands if you wanna fold them into it all. Guess when it rains all day, ya gotta do something.
 
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I was Soundgarden all the way back then, but in today's trying times, to me Pearl Jam is the all time greatest American rock band

Mark Arm did some great stuff, starting with Green River and even today I'll check out some new Mudhoney but it generally has little staying power for me

Every Good Boy .. can hang with anything from that gaggle
 
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I was Soundgarden all the way back then, but in today's trying times, to me Pearl Jam is the all time greatest American rock band
Talking whole package, I wouldn't argue much. Music and longevity is one thing, but just how accessible they are with their fans. Just a great band in total.
 
Every Good Boy .. can hang with anything from that gaggle

Yeah, that one is my favorite by them. I have no idea where the inspiration came from (Mark Arm's arm?), but it was definitely my late-night go-to rockfest my PG year of high school in '91-'92.

Thankfully, Arm kicked his habit and is still hanging around, working for Sub Pop last I heard (in their mailroom -- which is seriously a rousing success story compared to where he was going to wind up).
 
I swear I'm not even sure what playlist we're on or talking about right now but highlights on what I listened to this morning:

Decemberists/O New England - the song itself is another great one (looking forward to when entire band playlists drop at the end) but this is more to recount a convo from last night. At a pre-July 4th party, I was talking about this thread with a friend I go to shows with and mentioned a couple of new-to-me bands I was particularly enjoying. When I said "The Decemberists," he gave me a dirty look and replied "Dude, I've been trying to get you to go see them when they're in town for like the last dozen years." Whoops. In my defense, he's mainly into uber-indie rock bands that I find completely boring and depressing, so I just figured The Decemberists were another one of that ilk.

Taylor Swift/champagne problems - I was never dismissive of Taylor Swift or anything but also never really paid her any attention. My god this song is amazing and painful and relatable and a zillion other adjectives. Makes me happy that the most popular artist in the US (the planet?) is so worthy of the hype.

Slade/My Oh My - was listening on random and maybe Taylor put me in a melancholy mood, but My Oh My following on her heels was note perfect. Was shocked to check my phone and see it was Slade.

AC/DC/Dirty Deeds... - Dirty Deeds was the first non-KTel album I ever bought. Picked it up at a crappy local dept store called Ames when my dad took me out to get more whiffle balls - I was 8. Luckily, my dad didn't care nearly as much as my mom about age-appropriateness or else it would have been years before I was exposed to the glory of the title track or Big Balls (apologies if a spolier). My first cassette was the Go-Go's Beauty and the Beat, which seems less unseemly, but Belinda Carlisle may have been just as wild as Bon Scott.

Ray Charles/Hardhearted Hannah - I kept laughing on the dog walk because I pictured Simey choosing this one b/c she identified with the protagonist: "Leather is tough, but Simey's heart is tougher, she's a gal who loves to see men suffer."

Also, I already proclaimed my love for Bauhaus/Crowds in a previous post.
 
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Grunge got off on the wrong foot with me.

Grunge's ascendence seemed to cut off the ascendence of my beloved Smithereens. They were slowly expanding their niche sound and had even been asked by movie director Cameron Crowe to provide a song for his upcoming movie Say Anything. The song they came up with, A Girl Like You, was deemed too on the nose and was rejected. It would have been a coup of sorts if they had been embraced by the mainstream by providing an iconic song to a movie set in the birthplace of Grunge, but it didn't happen, Grunge became vogue and the rest is history. I took that very hard and didn't really give any of those bands a chance after that; they all just sounded like angry gargling that I couldn't connect with. I've softened a little, but that's just a big hole in my shared experience with my fellow Gen-Xers.
 
I definitely can remember Slade playing "My Oh My" on Solid Gold. No youtube of this. They had been on Solid Gold previously, playing the song that gave them a resurgence in the US. I had the US issue of that record, on a tape that somebody who wasn't dirt poor recorded onto a blank tape for me.

It was the flip side of Heartbeat City which kinda changed my life a little
 

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