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Ran a 10k - Official Thread (1 Viewer)

pbm107

Footballguy
I would just run as much volume as you can at easy pace. You're not looking to PR, just cover the distance and enjoy it. Might as well make the training the same thing.
@gianmarco, this is better than what I was going to respond with. I'm happy to see that you're training for Berlin.
 

caustic

Footballguy
Finished week 2 (13 miles) on Monday. Not a whole lot to report as I'm still in the earliest of early stages. On my Saturday and Monday runs I started to feel a prickly/stabby sensation in the arch of my left foot -- not sure if that's anything, but I did extra stretching/icing just in case. It didn't come back during this morning's run. :shrug: Eager to get to the longer runs where these slow efforts really start to pay off.
 

bushdocda

Footballguy
Just run.
I was looking for something easier than this. :(
I think your first chunk of weeks should be whatever gets you to show up the next day. At some point when you feel like it, you would benefit from having the faster/GMP days but maybe work them in as progressions or alternating miles instead of the plan approach.

I think mixing those in and also dropping some hill strides (sound terrible but less injury risk than flat strides) like 4x20 seconds a time or two a week at the end of easy runs will get you to a spot where you can enjoy the raceday and not racedie.
#hug
 

ChiefD

Footballguy
Ok, gents.....****'s getting real.

Exactly 4 months out from race day in Berlin. Yay!!

But, in all seriousness, I've been getting out the last few days and I loaded up Hanson's beginner's plan on my calendar (btw, found a cool tool on reddit to import any plan onto your online calendar if anyone is interested). The first few weeks are pretty "easy" and should serve to get a little base that I should have already had in place but didn't. Whatever. I'm not saying I'm going to follow the entire plan without missing a workout but I am going to try pretty hard to do most of it, including adding a little bit more these first few weeks so it's not a big shock when it jumps up big in week 6.

My goals for this race are legit to:

1) Not die
2) Enjoy the race.

I have no time goals whatsoever. And I don't plan on running this thing "hard" either. I want to make this an "enjoyable" marathon, running at a mostly comfortable pace for most of it. I'll stop and take pictures and basically just take it in. At my best, running that downhill race, I managed just under 9:00/mile pace or just under 4 hrs. I'm nowhere near that kind of shape. If I can do this thing at even a 10:30 pace (just over 4 1/2 hrs) comfortably I'll be content (and if it's slower than that, I don't really care).

The question becomes, how do I train for this with the workouts? While not quite there yet, my easy run paces will basically be that 10-10:30 min pace. When I start doing GMP runs, should I use the same time and basically just keep all my runs these next 4 months "easy"? Or, should I push a bit more during training so that running that pace during the race will make it feel easier? Keeping in mind that, while I'm going to really try to do it, I'm not ecstatic about training anyway and I think I'll have a higher likelihood of success in getting these runs in if I'm not hating most of them while I'm doing them in the heat and humidity out here that's about to start.

TIA and happy to answer yours......
My first marathon was a 10:06 pace and finished in 4:31:41. And I remember that race to be HARD. There was walking the last 5 miles and I worked that whole race.

So I'd be careful about taking it easy during all the training runs and thinking you can just get in around 4:30 or 4:45. I'd think you'll still want to mix in some speed work when you feel like it and try and train this as if you are racing it. With the caveat that on the days you just aren't feeling it just substitute and easy run or just skip one.

I know you don't want the grind. But I'd still give yourself a little bit of grind to make race day a little bit easier for you to hit your plan.
 

gianmarco

Footballguy
Thanks, guys. That all helps.

Yeah, I'm under no illusion that even 4:30 will be a cakewalk. @bushdocda , your thought process is basically what I had in mind. Start with doing what will keep me out there (which is why I've slowed down a couple runs lately) and if/when it feels better, push some. If I keep getting out there, I'll get to that point as I actually do enjoy some of that.

Come race day, if I need to run/walk, I will, but I'm truly going to try to get to a fitness level where I don't need to. I won't have a time goal even on race day and will run strictly by HR and feel. Get in decent enough shape and run whatever pace that day that keeps my HR in the low 150's and do that as long as I can. There will be no 2nd half in the mid 170's while you guys watch if the blue dot explodes on the screen.

And maybe it'll be over 64.7 degrees F and I'll get to run with @gruecd ......
 

tri-man 47

Footballguy
Finished week 2 (13 miles) on Monday. Not a whole lot to report as I'm still in the earliest of early stages. On my Saturday and Monday runs I started to feel a prickly/stabby sensation in the arch of my left foot -- not sure if that's anything, but I did extra stretching/icing just in case. It didn't come back during this morning's run. :shrug: Eager to get to the longer runs where these slow efforts really start to pay off.
Take care of those feet and ankles. Part of my first-in-the-morning and last-thing-at-night routine is to roll the feet in circles (both directions) and then simply wiggle the toes and flex the feet for a few seconds.
 

gianmarco

Footballguy
Finished week 2 (13 miles) on Monday. Not a whole lot to report as I'm still in the earliest of early stages. On my Saturday and Monday runs I started to feel a prickly/stabby sensation in the arch of my left foot -- not sure if that's anything, but I did extra stretching/icing just in case. It didn't come back during this morning's run. :shrug: Eager to get to the longer runs where these slow efforts really start to pay off.
Take care of those feet and ankles. Part of my first-in-the-morning and last-thing-at-night routine is to roll the feet in circles (both directions) and then simply wiggle the toes and flex the feet for a few seconds.
And what about your own feet?
 

MAC_32

Footballguy
Start with doing what will keep me out there (which is why I've slowed down a couple runs lately) and if/when it feels better, push some. If I keep getting out there, I'll get to that point as I actually do enjoy some of that.
:yes:

When I first read your text a couple weeks ago...then this earlier tonight...my mind immediately went to - it's gonna be July in St Louis pretty soon. Whatever gets you out there to net as many miles as possible is gonna do you better than any sort of structured plan. Do that long enough through The Suck then when you get that day that breaks just right for a few hours get a good night of sleep and cut it loose.
 

tri-man 47

Footballguy
Finished week 2 (13 miles) on Monday. Not a whole lot to report as I'm still in the earliest of early stages. On my Saturday and Monday runs I started to feel a prickly/stabby sensation in the arch of my left foot -- not sure if that's anything, but I did extra stretching/icing just in case. It didn't come back during this morning's run. :shrug: Eager to get to the longer runs where these slow efforts really start to pay off.
Take care of those feet and ankles. Part of my first-in-the-morning and last-thing-at-night routine is to roll the feet in circles (both directions) and then simply wiggle the toes and flex the feet for a few seconds.
And what about your own feet?
Well, of course ...I self-massage. NTTAWWT, amirite?
 

Juxtatarot

Footballguy
Finished week 2 (13 miles) on Monday. Not a whole lot to report as I'm still in the earliest of early stages. On my Saturday and Monday runs I started to feel a prickly/stabby sensation in the arch of my left foot -- not sure if that's anything, but I did extra stretching/icing just in case. It didn't come back during this morning's run. :shrug: Eager to get to the longer runs where these slow efforts really start to pay off.
I think that could describe plantar fasciitis. Be careful!
 

MAC_32

Footballguy
Much like this time last year I find this issue fascinatingly hilarious because I can do dynamic movements like russian speed lunges, pistol squats, single leg rdl's, etc at about 90% effort without issue. Try running though? Instant discomfort. But as I wrote above since I was smarter this year I think this will be short term instead of 6-8 weeks.

Still, how does just increasing time on feet for 4 weeks lead to this...
Age
Also, :yes:

The kids and other coaches (correctly) sassed me when I started showing up to practice with a porch rocker. I'd work with the kids through stairs and whatever middle distance workout we had planned for that day then when it was time for high jump practice it was time for my chair. I obviously couldn't get away with calling our 13 yo 'old man' anymore, but my back was much less problematic as I rocked along to the high jumping. Could used a cold beverage though.

But anyway, the weeks of harassment were worth it this week. When I set out for that jog Monday afternoon and everything on my left side hurt I was keenly reminded of being on the shelf this time last year. I'll never forget that old man shuffle I did from the van to my oldest when I picked him up from golf cause my back said nuh-uh, you're not walking tonight. When I set out for the run that set off that time bomb I pressed on anyway. This time? Quickly tapped out and quietly made my way to the gym. Backed off the upper body weights to about 80% of norm and mixed in some core. Next day stuck to lower at about 90% and was the same. Then today I went for that jog I intended to 2 days ago and while my left side still isn't 100% everything during and after's been fine.

So while I'm getting slower and fatter maybe I am getting wiser with age. Naaahhh...just lazier :rocks:
 

SteelCurtain

Footballguy
Ok, gents.....****'s getting real.

Exactly 4 months out from race day in Berlin. Yay!!

But, in all seriousness, I've been getting out the last few days and I loaded up Hanson's beginner's plan on my calendar (btw, found a cool tool on reddit to import any plan onto your online calendar if anyone is interested). The first few weeks are pretty "easy" and should serve to get a little base that I should have already had in place but didn't. Whatever. I'm not saying I'm going to follow the entire plan without missing a workout but I am going to try pretty hard to do most of it, including adding a little bit more these first few weeks so it's not a big shock when it jumps up big in week 6.

My goals for this race are legit to:

1) Not die
2) Enjoy the race.

I have no time goals whatsoever. And I don't plan on running this thing "hard" either. I want to make this an "enjoyable" marathon, running at a mostly comfortable pace for most of it. I'll stop and take pictures and basically just take it in. At my best, running that downhill race, I managed just under 9:00/mile pace or just under 4 hrs. I'm nowhere near that kind of shape. If I can do this thing at even a 10:30 pace (just over 4 1/2 hrs) comfortably I'll be content (and if it's slower than that, I don't really care).

The question becomes, how do I train for this with the workouts? While not quite there yet, my easy run paces will basically be that 10-10:30 min pace. When I start doing GMP runs, should I use the same time and basically just keep all my runs these next 4 months "easy"? Or, should I push a bit more during training so that running that pace during the race will make it feel easier? Keeping in mind that, while I'm going to really try to do it, I'm not ecstatic about training anyway and I think I'll have a higher likelihood of success in getting these runs in if I'm not hating most of them while I'm doing them in the heat and humidity out here that's about to start.

TIA and happy to answer yours......
The entire concept of Hanson's is the plan is built on different paces for different reasons and they all come together on raceday for a great race.

Therefore, its really not effective to not do the harder paces of this plan. Either you do Hanson's or you don't. If you don't, that's cool, but I don't think you can expect results if you blow off the tempo and/or interval work.

For me, I enjoy the grind of the plan and how it builds on each other and you get better each week. No doubt it is a grind though. I can't pretend it will be easy (to be fair, I do the higher mileage advanced plan).

Hanson's is frequently mentioned as not being accurate on the title of "beginner's plan". Do not think the beginners will be easy, because it is not.

If you want to run an "easy" 4.5 hour marathon, then you should train for a 4 hour marathon. If you train for a 4.5 hour marathon, you will find running that pace on raceday will be harder than you probably would like.

If you want to make the training easy for 4 months, then you can do that and just see what feels easy. Whatever that is, is probably likely going to be doable on race day. Because if you taper a bit and have race day energy, whatever pace you run for 20 in training....should translate to 26.2 on race day.

Hope this makes sense.
 

xulf

Footballguy
Ok, gents.....****'s getting real.

Exactly 4 months out from race day in Berlin. Yay!!

But, in all seriousness, I've been getting out the last few days and I loaded up Hanson's beginner's plan on my calendar (btw, found a cool tool on reddit to import any plan onto your online calendar if anyone is interested). The first few weeks are pretty "easy" and should serve to get a little base that I should have already had in place but didn't. Whatever. I'm not saying I'm going to follow the entire plan without missing a workout but I am going to try pretty hard to do most of it, including adding a little bit more these first few weeks so it's not a big shock when it jumps up big in week 6.

My goals for this race are legit to:

1) Not die
2) Enjoy the race.

I have no time goals whatsoever. And I don't plan on running this thing "hard" either. I want to make this an "enjoyable" marathon, running at a mostly comfortable pace for most of it. I'll stop and take pictures and basically just take it in. At my best, running that downhill race, I managed just under 9:00/mile pace or just under 4 hrs. I'm nowhere near that kind of shape. If I can do this thing at even a 10:30 pace (just over 4 1/2 hrs) comfortably I'll be content (and if it's slower than that, I don't really care).

The question becomes, how do I train for this with the workouts? While not quite there yet, my easy run paces will basically be that 10-10:30 min pace. When I start doing GMP runs, should I use the same time and basically just keep all my runs these next 4 months "easy"? Or, should I push a bit more during training so that running that pace during the race will make it feel easier? Keeping in mind that, while I'm going to really try to do it, I'm not ecstatic about training anyway and I think I'll have a higher likelihood of success in getting these runs in if I'm not hating most of them while I'm doing them in the heat and humidity out here that's about to start.

TIA and happy to answer yours......

My first instinct would be to do your Hanson prescribed "GMP" runs at 9:30 and the rest of your runs at the 10:00-10:30 or slower.

That would be one faster run per week with a long run still thrown in there. Based on your experience, you should be able to handle that 9:30 pace and that will make your "true" GMP pace feel easier.
 

tri-man 47

Footballguy
Ok, gents.....****'s getting real.

Exactly 4 months out from race day in Berlin. Yay!!

But, in all seriousness, I've been getting out the last few days and I loaded up Hanson's beginner's plan on my calendar (btw, found a cool tool on reddit to import any plan onto your online calendar if anyone is interested). The first few weeks are pretty "easy" and should serve to get a little base that I should have already had in place but didn't. Whatever. I'm not saying I'm going to follow the entire plan without missing a workout but I am going to try pretty hard to do most of it, including adding a little bit more these first few weeks so it's not a big shock when it jumps up big in week 6.

My goals for this race are legit to:

1) Not die
2) Enjoy the race.

I have no time goals whatsoever. And I don't plan on running this thing "hard" either. I want to make this an "enjoyable" marathon, running at a mostly comfortable pace for most of it. I'll stop and take pictures and basically just take it in. At my best, running that downhill race, I managed just under 9:00/mile pace or just under 4 hrs. I'm nowhere near that kind of shape. If I can do this thing at even a 10:30 pace (just over 4 1/2 hrs) comfortably I'll be content (and if it's slower than that, I don't really care).

The question becomes, how do I train for this with the workouts? While not quite there yet, my easy run paces will basically be that 10-10:30 min pace. When I start doing GMP runs, should I use the same time and basically just keep all my runs these next 4 months "easy"? Or, should I push a bit more during training so that running that pace during the race will make it feel easier? Keeping in mind that, while I'm going to really try to do it, I'm not ecstatic about training anyway and I think I'll have a higher likelihood of success in getting these runs in if I'm not hating most of them while I'm doing them in the heat and humidity out here that's about to start.

TIA and happy to answer yours......
My thought: Since hills are “intervals in disguise,” make active use of the rolling hills in your area …either push hard’ish on a few hills during an occasional run or maybe once a week focus on some hill repeats.
 

caustic

Footballguy
Ok, gents.....****'s getting real.

Exactly 4 months out from race day in Berlin. Yay!!

But, in all seriousness, I've been getting out the last few days and I loaded up Hanson's beginner's plan on my calendar (btw, found a cool tool on reddit to import any plan onto your online calendar if anyone is interested). The first few weeks are pretty "easy" and should serve to get a little base that I should have already had in place but didn't. Whatever. I'm not saying I'm going to follow the entire plan without missing a workout but I am going to try pretty hard to do most of it, including adding a little bit more these first few weeks so it's not a big shock when it jumps up big in week 6.

My goals for this race are legit to:

1) Not die
2) Enjoy the race.

I have no time goals whatsoever. And I don't plan on running this thing "hard" either. I want to make this an "enjoyable" marathon, running at a mostly comfortable pace for most of it. I'll stop and take pictures and basically just take it in. At my best, running that downhill race, I managed just under 9:00/mile pace or just under 4 hrs. I'm nowhere near that kind of shape. If I can do this thing at even a 10:30 pace (just over 4 1/2 hrs) comfortably I'll be content (and if it's slower than that, I don't really care).

The question becomes, how do I train for this with the workouts? While not quite there yet, my easy run paces will basically be that 10-10:30 min pace. When I start doing GMP runs, should I use the same time and basically just keep all my runs these next 4 months "easy"? Or, should I push a bit more during training so that running that pace during the race will make it feel easier? Keeping in mind that, while I'm going to really try to do it, I'm not ecstatic about training anyway and I think I'll have a higher likelihood of success in getting these runs in if I'm not hating most of them while I'm doing them in the heat and humidity out here that's about to start.

TIA and happy to answer yours......
The entire concept of Hanson's is the plan is built on different paces for different reasons and they all come together on raceday for a great race.

Therefore, its really not effective to not do the harder paces of this plan. Either you do Hanson's or you don't. If you don't, that's cool, but I don't think you can expect results if you blow off the tempo and/or interval work.

For me, I enjoy the grind of the plan and how it builds on each other and you get better each week. No doubt it is a grind though. I can't pretend it will be easy (to be fair, I do the higher mileage advanced plan).

Hanson's is frequently mentioned as not being accurate on the title of "beginner's plan". Do not think the beginners will be easy, because it is not.

If you want to run an "easy" 4.5 hour marathon, then you should train for a 4 hour marathon. If you train for a 4.5 hour marathon, you will find running that pace on raceday will be harder than you probably would like.

If you want to make the training easy for 4 months, then you can do that and just see what feels easy. Whatever that is, is probably likely going to be doable on race day. Because if you taper a bit and have race day energy, whatever pace you run for 20 in training....should translate to 26.2 on race day.

Hope this makes sense.
Just peeked at the Hanson's beginner plan for fun - HFS! :lmao: I think my calves would turn to stone.
 

gianmarco

Footballguy
Well, I just wanted to thank you guys again. I've looked over all the responses and this is basically what I've come up with using all the advice:

For the first few weeks, I'm going to just do what keeps me going out there, but I can't take it too easy because even running a 4:30 marathon won't be easy and if I train for a 4:30 marathon, it's going to not be as easy as I like, so I should run some of my runs at 9:30 GMP pace even though it's not really Hanson's if I don't do it all the way which is why I should also do hills since those are basically intervals and I have hills all over the place here and if I get a nice day of weather, I should let it rip.

Basically, I need to "just run".
 

ChiefD

Footballguy
Well, I just wanted to thank you guys again. I've looked over all the responses and this is basically what I've come up with using all the advice:

For the first few weeks, I'm going to just do what keeps me going out there, but I can't take it too easy because even running a 4:30 marathon won't be easy and if I train for a 4:30 marathon, it's going to not be as easy as I like, so I should run some of my runs at 9:30 GMP pace even though it's not really Hanson's if I don't do it all the way which is why I should also do hills since those are basically intervals and I have hills all over the place here and if I get a nice day of weather, I should let it rip.

Basically, I need to "just run".
and don't be a pooosay.
 

tri-man 47

Footballguy
Doing you proud, @pbm107 . A student of mine from a fall class at North Central College is a top runner for this accomplished school. I'd posted that he achieved All-American status in the fall following a really strong performance at the national XC meet in the snow and extreme cold. He just ran the 10K at the spring D III outdoor nationals up in Rochester, NY and finished 12th overall. He ran a 29:36 ...4:46/mile for the 10K. Basically - 70/71 seconds per 400m. :loco: And during the last 200 meters ...he vomited. :thumbup:
 

xulf

Footballguy
Well, I just wanted to thank you guys again. I've looked over all the responses and this is basically what I've come up with using all the advice:

For the first few weeks, I'm going to just do what keeps me going out there, but I can't take it too easy because even running a 4:30 marathon won't be easy and if I train for a 4:30 marathon, it's going to not be as easy as I like, so I should run some of my runs at 9:30 GMP pace even though it's not really Hanson's if I don't do it all the way which is why I should also do hills since those are basically intervals and I have hills all over the place here and if I get a nice day of weather, I should let it rip.

Basically, I need to "just run".

Glad to see you embracing the wisdom of the thread :hifive:
 

pbm107

Footballguy
Doing you proud, @pbm107 . A student of mine from a fall class at North Central College is a top runner for this accomplished school. I'd posted that he achieved All-American status in the fall following a really strong performance at the national XC meet in the snow and extreme cold. He just ran the 10K at the spring D III outdoor nationals up in Rochester, NY and finished 12th overall. He ran a 29:36 ...4:46/mile for the 10K. Basically - 70/71 seconds per 400m. :loco: And during the last 200 meters ...he vomited. :thumbup:
I am glad I am not alone, but it’s the most frustrating vomiting before the finish. Your student is crazy fast, I love that I’m the vomit guy around here.
 

xulf

Footballguy
Signed up for a 5k on 6/3.

Weirdly, I've never really raced this distance...just the solo virtual one we did during COVID.

This appears to be a new event, so I don't know anything about it. It's run by "Hometown" that puts these on all over the country, so hopefully they know what they are doing. It's also a 10k and HM, so it should have a decent number of people.

I wanted to do something fast since I've been doing so much distance training. We will see how it goes :oldunsure:

Suck. It's going to be hot - hi/lo of 90/64 on the day. It's a morning race, but still...
 

-OZ-

Footballguy
Out here watching / volunteering as a court marshal for the para cycling World Cup is inspiring. Various handicaps, amputees, back injuries, etc. had the opportunity to talk a bit with a couple of the coaches from Belgium and the Netherlands. Truly inspirational.
I’m not sure I’m adding any value “blocking traffic” At this spot, with 8-10 coaches, paramedics and a tv crew right here but it’s been fun to watch.
 

Dr_Zaius

Footballguy
Got back out twice over the long weekend, although was 0/2 on successfully getting to 7 miles. Cut short at 6 and 5 on the two days. It was warm both days, but for whatever reason things went from feeling fine to being cooked between the 3 and 5 mile mark. I guess I'm not fully recovered yet. Deep breaths still feel off, so it's probably related. The other weird thing is that sometime in my hiatus I developed tightness/slight pain in my right hamstring. I could feel it during my runs, but no pulling or sharp pains, so I'm hopeful it will be fine as long as I don't do anything stupid. Still, good to be back out there. Also, laying out on the porch with a glass of ice water post-run on a hot day is about as good as it gets.
 

Dr_Zaius

Footballguy
Basically, I need to "just run".
I think you've gotten all of the good advice you need out of the smart folk here, but I just wanted to add 1) it's good to see you back on my strava feed, and 2) I think you might surprise yourself at the end of this cycle. You've got a lot of built-up fitness locked away from your past exploits, and it may come back more quickly than you expect.
 

Dr_Zaius

Footballguy
You've got a lot of built-up fitness locked away from your past exploits, and it may come back more quickly than you expect.
Does that go for me, too?
Prefacing it with the fact that I know nothing, but I think it all depends on your expectations. If you're trying to challenge your past PRs, obviously that's a much longer path back. If you're trying to get in the realm of the last time you ran Boston, you might not be that far off.
 

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