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Ran a 10k - Official Thread


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13 minutes ago, gianmarco said:

Most every watch/app/etc defaults to auto laps at 1 mile.  That's how we all get our mile splits and when you look at Strava you see the pace for each mile.  If you are trying to use the pacing on your watch, that's definitely what you want to pay attention to.  Even if you don't have a specific field for lap pace, it'll usually buzz at each mile and give you what the split was and you can see if you're running too fast or too slow for whatever you're trying to accomplish. 

And, I would suggest not trying for any specific pace for a full run.  For example, maybe you need a nice, slow 12 or 13 minute mile just to warm up.  That's not going to help the overall pace number but it's also pretty irrelevant if you run the next 5 miles at 9:30 pace.  Even if you want to set a goal of sub 10 minute runs, only apply it to when it matters, which is yet another reason to pay attention to the auto lap 1 mile splits. 

My goal of 6mph for the full run is totally arbitrary I just feel better knowing I ran 7 miles in 70 minutes than 71 (or 6.85 in 68:30 or whatever).  Same thing with my next goal of running that whole thing in an hour - I've flirted with 65 minutes or less, and going the other direction might help my speed by pushing the big uphills later in the run so that will probably help keep my heart rate in check.  I'll be flying blind a little because I know the route but don't really know what to expect in terms of pace yet - maybe 930 or 10 on the first mile and then some 9s for the next couple until I hit the uphills and then 11 or 12, followed by a fast final mile... it definitely sounds easier than starting with an uphill mile and being halfway gassed out of the gate... 

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10 minutes ago, bostonfred said:

My goal of 6mph for the full run is totally arbitrary I just feel better knowing I ran 7 miles in 70 minutes than 71 (or 6.85 in 68:30 or whatever).  Same thing with my next goal of running that whole thing in an hour - I've flirted with 65 minutes or less, and going the other direction might help my speed by pushing the big uphills later in the run so that will probably help keep my heart rate in check.  I'll be flying blind a little because I know the route but don't really know what to expect in terms of pace yet - maybe 930 or 10 on the first mile and then some 9s for the next couple until I hit the uphills and then 11 or 12, followed by a fast final mile... it definitely sounds easier than starting with an uphill mile and being halfway gassed out of the gate... 

My advice which is the same advice I got from most here, especially when I first started:  get rid of that arbitrary goal.  Just run.

The reasons for that:  1)  That may or may not be where your current level of fitness is.  Trying to hit some arbitrary round number doesn't help you.  2)  On any given day, due to numerous variables (stress, sleep, diet, hydration, weather, terrain, etc), you may be faster or slower than your current fitness pace.  Trying to hit the same number on every run is a recipe for disaster.  3) The more you run, the faster you will likely end up getting, especially in the beginning.

You should pull up your HR and simply run by that.  Some days that might be a 10:30 pace.  Another day it might be 9:45.  Another day it might be 10:00 exactly and make you incredibly happy.  But, just run by HR (and feel).  In other words, just run.  Keep it easy most of the time.  One day you might be feeling particularly spry and you can go faster and see how it goes.  Might be for the whole rest of the run.  Might just be for a mile or two.  Beauty of it is...it doesn't matter.  And then afterward, just run slowly again to recover. 

And with Strava, it'll keep track of all this data and you'll be able to go back and see how you're improving.  Or if you're not and if something might be going on.  But right now, just starting out, don't worry about the data and numbers.  Run first, analyze afterward.  This is coming from someone that wanted to do exactly what you do when I started. 

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3 minutes ago, gianmarco said:

My advice which is the same advice I got from most here, especially when I first started:  get rid of that arbitrary goal.  Just run.

The reasons for that:  1)  That may or may not be where your current level of fitness is.  Trying to hit some arbitrary round number doesn't help you.  2)  On any given day, due to numerous variables (stress, sleep, diet, hydration, weather, terrain, etc), you may be faster or slower than your current fitness pace.  Trying to hit the same number on every run is a recipe for disaster.  3) The more you run, the faster you will likely end up getting, especially in the beginning.

You should pull up your HR and simply run by that.  Some days that might be a 10:30 pace.  Another day it might be 9:45.  Another day it might be 10:00 exactly and make you incredibly happy.  But, just run by HR (and feel).  In other words, just run.  Keep it easy most of the time.  One day you might be feeling particularly spry and you can go faster and see how it goes.  Might be for the whole rest of the run.  Might just be for a mile or two.  Beauty of it is...it doesn't matter.  And then afterward, just run slowly again to recover. 

And with Strava, it'll keep track of all this data and you'll be able to go back and see how you're improving.  Or if you're not and if something might be going on.  But right now, just starting out, don't worry about the data and numbers.  Run first, analyze afterward.  This is coming from someone that wanted to do exactly what you do when I started. 

:goodposting:

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On 5/23/2021 at 9:20 AM, bostonfred said:

Do you guys use special running socks too or just regular socks or ?

Something that's moisture-wicking for sure.  I run exclusively in Balega Hidden Comfort.  They're pricey, but like most things, you get what you pay for.

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45 minutes ago, gianmarco said:

My advice which is the same advice I got from most here, especially when I first started:  get rid of that arbitrary goal.  Just run.

The reasons for that:  1)  That may or may not be where your current level of fitness is.  Trying to hit some arbitrary round number doesn't help you.  2)  On any given day, due to numerous variables (stress, sleep, diet, hydration, weather, terrain, etc), you may be faster or slower than your current fitness pace.  Trying to hit the same number on every run is a recipe for disaster.  3) The more you run, the faster you will likely end up getting, especially in the beginning.

You should pull up your HR and simply run by that.  Some days that might be a 10:30 pace.  Another day it might be 9:45.  Another day it might be 10:00 exactly and make you incredibly happy.  But, just run by HR (and feel).  In other words, just run.  Keep it easy most of the time.  One day you might be feeling particularly spry and you can go faster and see how it goes.  Might be for the whole rest of the run.  Might just be for a mile or two.  Beauty of it is...it doesn't matter.  And then afterward, just run slowly again to recover. 

And with Strava, it'll keep track of all this data and you'll be able to go back and see how you're improving.  Or if you're not and if something might be going on.  But right now, just starting out, don't worry about the data and numbers.  Run first, analyze afterward.  This is coming from someone that wanted to do exactly what you do when I started. 

100% this.

I do observe some runners looking at their watch or phone every 50 yards.  They always look miserable. 

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@bostonfred - just run.  Do a RPE test (info:  https://www.verywellfit.com/rating-of-perceived-exertion-scale-3119445).  I prefer to just use a 5 point scale, YMMV.  Point of this is to start framing your exerction.  You dont want to be in tempo/race pace all the time.  I would recommend 80% of time in easy running and 20% of time not in easy running.  Quick article:  https://lonelygoat.com/80-20-training#:~:text=Simply put%2C the 80%2F20,the athlete's ventilatory 'threshold'.

Then just run.  Go by comfort and HR.  Dont want to run?  Dont.  Want to run?  Go.  Worst case is you grow to hate running.  Lets not do that :)

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Just now, Juxtatarot said:

In all honesty, I don’t see Boston Fred as someone who can Zen-out and follow the “Just run!” advice. NTTAWWT.

Agree.  That's why I said to put the HR on and run by that.  It'll give him an objective measure he can check every 17 seconds and still do well with.  Some people need real-time feedback ( :hey:) and that would hopefully satisfy that and still serve him well.  Plus, he's already familiar with it having done an MAF approach. 

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11 minutes ago, gianmarco said:

Agree.  That's why I said to put the HR on and run by that.  It'll give him an objective measure he can check every 17 seconds and still do well with.  Some people need real-time feedback ( :hey:) and that would hopefully satisfy that and still serve him well.  Plus, he's already familiar with it having done an MAF approach. 

I’m sure I’ve posted about this before but I often think about how I trained for my first marathon. No heart rate monitor. No running watch. Sometimes I ran with a stopwatch in my pocket but usually not. I did have a nice Sony Discman.  Mostly stuck to the same routes that I knew the approximate distance from driving them in my car.

In many ways I think the old school approach can be better for new runners. (Except for the Discman.)

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58 minutes ago, Brony said:

100% this.

I do observe some runners looking at their watch or phone every 50 yards.  They always look miserable. 

Yeah I try to not look at my watch for pacing.  Another reason metric is so awesome is that I get frequent-enough feedback with each "lap"/km being read to me over bluetooth, that it's enough to keep me from looking at my watch.

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I have never treated running as a sport before..  it was always just exercise.. now that I'm actually trying to get better at this I know that bonking 3.5 miles in to a 7 mile run is super inefficient and I need to figure out why that happens and fix it, and reading a random article that said running with my front foot under me would keep me from ####### up my knees made me want to talk it out with people who are much better at this than I am.  

But when I am actually running I'm mostly getting lost in thought about other stuff, work or that girl I used to like or the thing I'm working on at the house or that book I'm going to write eventually.  I don't wear headphones yet but will eventually once I figure out how to play music or audio books from my watch.  I really do just run most of the time it's just that my version of just running hasn't been that good and I think I can make real improvements fairly quickly by improving a few things here and there before settling into the routine. 

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Not sure what you mean by "bonking". Perhaps it's you running too fast and wearing out? Or is it getting into an uncomfortable feeling? Bonking from a race standpoint is going out way too fast and not being able to finish well (or at all) as a result. That's unlikely to be happening to you based on the HR and paces from your runs. Can you describe what you mean by that?

Otherwise, you might just need to run the whole 7 miles slower to get to the end without that feeling and build from there.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, gianmarco said:

Not sure what you mean by "bonking". Perhaps it's you running too fast and wearing out? Or is it getting into an uncomfortable feeling? Bonking from a race standpoint is going out way too fast and not being able to finish well (or at all) as a result. That's unlikely to be happening to you based on the HR and paces from your runs. Can you describe what you mean by that?

Otherwise, you might just need to run the whole 7 miles slower to get to the end without that feeling and build from there.

Yes I mean going out too fast and wearing out.  I'm starting with a long uphill, then it gets flatter and I feel good and go a little too fast, then there's a couple down hills and I inevitably go way too fast on one of them, slow down a little and then get back to it only to find I'm out of gas.  I'm able to get back to it eventually but I'm definitely wearing myself out early.  Last run I did the uphill at 10:29, ran the next two at 9:39 and 8:53, set a "record" for my fastest single mile at 8:31 and then when I got back to the flats I was back to 10:29, the same pace I ran uphill on my first mile.  That's not terrible but I feel like I should be able to run faster on the flats than up a hill and faster on later miles than the sucky first mile if I'm pacing right.  So I'm probably going too fast on one of those earlier miles and I'm not sure if it's the up or the down or both. Maybe using heart rate would help me answer that.  

I think doing the course backwards will help with that because most of the hills will be at the end and I will finish downhill so it's ok if I wear myself out going hard on the last mile. 

Edited by bostonfred
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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, gianmarco said:

Not sure what you mean by "bonking". Perhaps it's you running too fast and wearing out? Or is it getting into an uncomfortable feeling? Bonking from a race standpoint is going out way too fast and not being able to finish well (or at all) as a result. That's unlikely to be happening to you based on the HR and paces from your runs. Can you describe what you mean by that?

Otherwise, you might just need to run the whole 7 miles slower to get to the end without that feeling and build from there.

See, all this talk of bonking reminds me of the movie Four Weddings and a Funeral.

"What's bonking?"

"It's kind of like table tennis, only with slightly smaller balls"

Edited by Alex P Keaton
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28 minutes ago, Alex P Keaton said:
2 hours ago, bostonfred said:

or that girl I used to like 

Maybe we could just focus on the most important part here, and expand on this topic for a few posts before getting lost in all this running nonsense.

/checks notebook

Wasnt @bostonfredthe one who introduced the looping GIF of the girl removing shirts?

:wub:

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Am I the dumbest person to ever walk the Earth? My 245 was over a half mile off this morning on a short, easy 4 mile loop that I know by heart. This is the second Garmin that I've had this exact issue with after 1.5-2 years. It always starts with me getting weirdly slow paces for a couple of weeks, and then deciding to check it against a route I know that I know for 100%.

I'm not a 100 mile a week master man, so I have zero idea what the issue is. It has to be me at this point. Or am I being a diva about how long these babies should last?

Anybody like their Suunto? I really only care about the distance and time being correct. The other bells and whistles are great and I love looking at the data, but jeez.

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21 minutes ago, Rirruto said:

I'm not a 100 mile a week master man, so I have zero idea what the issue is. It has to be me at this point. Or am I being a diva about how long these babies should last?

This doesn't seem like a feature that should degrade over time.  Either it works, or it doesn't.  Is the area you're running in heavily-treed?  Maybe in summer it has less of a view of the sky?

I'm not sure if the 245 lets you choose which satellite network to use.  My Fenix will let me choose:

Go Run --> Options (up button) --> Run Settings --> GPS, and it will give you your GPS options.  I use "GPS + GALILELO" but I can choose any combination of GPS/GLONASS/GALILEO.  

Maybe change that up and see how it performs.

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Posted (edited)

Injury + lost fitness + heat + humidity = my first 160 peak HR in a year.  Ugh.  At (what was) an ER pace pre-injury/break.

ETA:  Bright side is that I burn 200 more calories on my standard 11.6km run now than I used to, pre-injury?

Edited by Zasada
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34 minutes ago, Rirruto said:

Am I the dumbest person to ever walk the Earth? My 245 was over a half mile off this morning on a short, easy 4 mile loop that I know by heart. This is the second Garmin that I've had this exact issue with after 1.5-2 years. It always starts with me getting weirdly slow paces for a couple of weeks, and then deciding to check it against a route I know that I know for 100%.

I'm not a 100 mile a week master man, so I have zero idea what the issue is. It has to be me at this point. Or am I being a diva about how long these babies should last?

Anybody like their Suunto? I really only care about the distance and time being correct. The other bells and whistles are great and I love looking at the data, but jeez.

What does the map look like on Garmin Connect? Do you see where it’s off? On my old watch I used to have occasional problems (often near the same spot) but my new watch is OK.

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3 minutes ago, Juxtatarot said:

What does the map look like on Garmin Connect? Do you see where it’s off? On my old watch I used to have occasional problems (often near the same spot) but my new watch is OK.

Yeah I should have noted that my watch will always track me wrong in one section of my run consistently.  Almost all of my runs see a spike in my pace near my house, on the return, because of this.  No idea why.

Not a huge deal, though.

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1 hour ago, Juxtatarot said:

What does the map look like on Garmin Connect? Do you see where it’s off? On my old watch I used to have occasional problems (often near the same spot) but my new watch is OK.

The map starts at my house but stops just around the block. So probably 400m of the total route. So that makes me think there's a GPS issue. It was on the whole time because I looked down every 2 minutes and said a string of curse words, and I don't do auto-pause or anything. No biggie. Easy come, easy go.

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Posted (edited)
4 minutes ago, Rirruto said:

The map starts at my house but stops just around the block. So probably 400m of the total route. So that makes me think there's a GPS issue. It was on the whole time because I looked down every 2 minutes and said a string of curse words, and I don't do auto-pause or anything. No biggie. Easy come, easy go.

That's really weird and I think Zasada's suggestion of seeing if you can change the GPS options is a good one.

You sure you don't live next to a CIA Black Ops site?

Edited by Dr_Zaius
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2 hours ago, Rirruto said:

Am I the dumbest person to ever walk the Earth? My 245 was over a half mile off this morning on a short, easy 4 mile loop that I know by heart. This is the second Garmin that I've had this exact issue with after 1.5-2 years. It always starts with me getting weirdly slow paces for a couple of weeks, and then deciding to check it against a route I know that I know for 100%.

I'm not a 100 mile a week master man, so I have zero idea what the issue is. It has to be me at this point. Or am I being a diva about how long these babies should last?

Anybody like their Suunto? I really only care about the distance and time being correct. The other bells and whistles are great and I love looking at the data, but jeez.

Did it lock on gps before you started, sounds like no. Annoying problem for sure.  I usually turn my run function on while still getting ready to give things time to find me. 

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44 minutes ago, Rirruto said:

The map starts at my house but stops just around the block. So probably 400m of the total route. So that makes me think there's a GPS issue. It was on the whole time because I looked down every 2 minutes and said a string of curse words, and I don't do auto-pause or anything. No biggie. Easy come, easy go.

I know of a few spots near my house where the pacing always gets funky.  I've speculated that those points might be where I'm crossing between a change in cell towers or something.  Do your issues always occur, and always on the same route?  I.e., if you ran a different route, would/does the same thing happen?

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42 minutes ago, bushdocda said:

Did it lock on gps before you started, sounds like no. Annoying problem for sure.  I usually turn my run function on while still getting ready to give things time to find me. 

That was my first thought as well.

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29 minutes ago, tri-man 47 said:

I know of a few spots near my house where the pacing always gets funky.  I've speculated that those points might be where I'm crossing between a change in cell towers or something.  Do your issues always occur, and always on the same route?  I.e., if you ran a different route, would/does the same thing happen?

Looking through my old maps on Strava, I think today is the first time that I've had a "that map is not at all the route I did." But I did the test because my runs on different routes have been funky as far as pace, although that could easily be attributed to summer starting up. Those routes I sorta know the distance, but not enough to say that anything was off with total confidence. A month or so ago it measured a half at 13.18 (so dead on when you consider my own inefficiency when it comes to route running).

I took @Zasada's rec and changed from Glosnass to Gallileo. I'm going to leave it turned off for the rest of the day and see how it does tomorrow afternoon.

Thanks for all the bros!

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6 minutes ago, Rirruto said:

Looking through my old maps on Strava, I think today is the first time that I've had a "that map is not at all the route I did." But I did the test because my runs on different routes have been funky as far as pace, although that could easily be attributed to summer starting up. Those routes I sorta know the distance, but not enough to say that anything was off with total confidence. A month or so ago it measured a half at 13.18 (so dead on when you consider my own inefficiency when it comes to route running).

I took @Zasada's rec and changed from Glosnass to Gallileo. I'm going to leave it turned off for the rest of the day and see how it does tomorrow afternoon.

Thanks for all the bros!

I believe there's a setting that does all the sat systems.  I would try that.

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My last Garmin had elevation issues when it got dirty (connector caked with sweat).  I’d clean it and elevation would be fine and then it would slowly start giving wonky elevations.  In addition to the other suggestions try giving the connector a good cleaning.

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Pretty excited about my run yesterday because I still feel great today.  Did back to back 7 milers over the weekend for the first time so yesterday was going to be a shorter recovery run, decided to do some hill runs.  There's a steep hill followed by a longer hill so I figured I would do the steep hill three times, then go back to the bottom and do the steep hill followed by the long hill, go back to the bottom and do the whole thing again.  Turns out the steep hill is about a quarter mile and the longer hill is about .8 total, plus the distance out to the hills and back, so my total run was just over 6 miles, all hills. 

Which means I ended up following my first back to back 7s with a hilly 6 and I think I'm still ready to do my 7 again today if time permits.  I feel like I have turned a corner here where I went from just trying to be able to do the distance to trying to get good at it. 

I'd like to try running my 7 mile route backwards today to see if it helps my time, but tempering my expectations because I have put so much more wear on my legs the last few days than I usually do.  

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Posted (edited)
3 minutes ago, bostonfred said:

Pretty excited about my run yesterday because I still feel great today.  Did back to back 7 milers over the weekend for the first time so yesterday was going to be a shorter recovery run, decided to do some hill runs.  There's a steep hill followed by a longer hill so I figured I would do the steep hill three times, then go back to the bottom and do the steep hill followed by the long hill, go back to the bottom and do the whole thing again.  Turns out the steep hill is about a quarter mile and the longer hill is about .8 total, plus the distance out to the hills and back, so my total run was just over 6 miles, all hills. 

Which means I ended up following my first back to back 7s with a hilly 6 and I think I'm still ready to do my 7 again today if time permits.  I feel like I have turned a corner here where I went from just trying to be able to do the distance to trying to get good at it. 

I'd like to try running my 7 mile route backwards today to see if it helps my time, but tempering my expectations because I have put so much more wear on my legs the last few days than I usually do.  

After first time back to back 7 miles followed by a 6 mile run with elevation, which would be considered a workout, you're asking for trouble if you do anything but slow running today.

You can run 7, and it would be a good idea to try the other direction, but time should be completely ignored today. Keep it easy and keep that HR low and use today to recover from these last 3 days.

ETA -- Nice job on the hill repeats yesterday. Solid run.

Edited by gianmarco
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Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, gianmarco said:

After first time back to back 7 miles followed by a 6 mile run with elevation, which would be considered a workout, you're asking for trouble if you do anything but slow running today.

You can run 7, and it would be a good idea to try the other direction, but time should be completely ignored today. Keep it easy and keep that HR low and use today to recover from these last 3 days.

ETA -- Nice job on the hill repeats yesterday. Solid run.

Yeah, agree.

Oh, and @bostonfred, when you are really ready for the nerds to be all up in your business, try and figure out your maximum heart rate.  That way we can all calculate what heart rate zones you should be running all of your runs in so we can map out your training plan for the next 8 years.

The way I figured mine out was I warmed up for about a mile. Then ran an uphill route as hard and as fast as I could. Ended up at 191 that day, so I added a couple of beats because in all honesty I probably pooosayed out a little.

But later on I ran a race that got me to 197. 

As always, proceed with that above workout with caution once you are ready. It's a gut buster for sure.

Edited by ChiefD
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3 minutes ago, gianmarco said:

After first time back to back 7 miles followed by a 6 mile run with elevation, which would be considered a workout, you're asking for trouble if you do anything but slow running today.

You can run 7, and it would be a good idea to try the other direction, but time should be completely ignored today. Keep it easy and keep that HR low and use today to recover from these last 3 days.

ETA -- Nice job on the hill repeats yesterday. Solid run.

Thanks

This does seem more sensible 

And probably wiser to try the backwards route once before trying to set a PR on it. The big thing is by doing the hills at the end instead of the beginning, I won't be raising my heart rate up as much early on

Do you know how to set a heart rate alarm or something on the active2?  

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1 minute ago, bostonfred said:

Thanks

This does seem more sensible 

And probably wiser to try the backwards route once before trying to set a PR on it. The big thing is by doing the hills at the end instead of the beginning, I won't be raising my heart rate up as much early on

Do you know how to set a heart rate alarm or something on the active2?  

I don't. Was going to play with it later today so I'll check. If it starts to feel difficult at all, slow down. Or even just walk the hill.  Think of today as giving your body rest even though you're running. It takes discipline.

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4 minutes ago, ChiefD said:

Yeah, agree.

Oh, and @bostonfred, when you are really ready for the nerds to be all up in your business, try and figure out your maximum heart rate.  That way we can all calculate what heart rate zones you should be running all of your runs in so we can map out your training plan for the next 8 years.

The way I figured mine out was I warmed up for about a mile. Then ran an uphill route as hard and as fast as I could. Ended up at 191 that day, so I added a couple of beats because in all honesty I probably pooosayed out a little.

But later on I ran a race that got me to 197. 

As always, proceed with that above workout with caution once you are ready. It's a gut buster for sure.

Everything about this sounds horrifying 

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4 minutes ago, bostonfred said:

Everything about this sounds horrifying 

It is. But trust me, it works. 

Running slower = more speed.  But first you need to know your max heart rate. 

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I'll also add - you don't have to do this bostonfred.

You are doing awesome things by just running. So if that's what you want to do, do it. You've done some great things in the threads around here regarding fitness and weight loss and such.

 

But the rest of us nerds see some potential in a guy like you who has the enthusiasm and the "want to" right now. So all of the help you get in here is definitely with your performance in mind.

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57 minutes ago, bostonfred said:

I'd like to try running my 7 mile route backwards today to see if it helps my time, but tempering my expectations because I have put so much more wear on my legs the last few days than I usually do.  

Be safe...make sure to constantly check over your shoulder or use a mirror.

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57 minutes ago, ChiefD said:

The way I figured mine out was I warmed up for about a mile. Then ran an uphill route as hard and as fast as I could. Ended up at 191 that day, so I added a couple of beats because in all honesty I probably pooosayed out a little.

Is there a prescribed time needed for figuring this out? 

I know from ye olden days that my HR goes higher than what it's been in my recent workouts...just wondering what the best method of doing it is. Thought about trying a Cooper Test- 2m <12min...which would destroy me (and I wouldnt be able to get there). But bleh. If there's a shorter route to this agony, sign me up.

And also...do I have to set or tell my watch that I'm doing an HR threshold test, or will it just know on its own based on the spike vs recent workouts?

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20 minutes ago, El Floppo said:

Is there a prescribed time needed for figuring this out? 

I know from ye olden days that my HR goes higher than what it's been in my recent workouts...just wondering what the best method of doing it is. Thought about trying a Cooper Test- 2m <12min...which would destroy me (and I wouldnt be able to get there). But bleh. If there's a shorter route to this agony, sign me up.

And also...do I have to set or tell my watch that I'm doing an HR threshold test, or will it just know on its own based on the spike vs recent workouts?

You don't have to set anything. You can attempt the Cooper Test. Or your fastest mile. And then when you feel like you can't go anymore, sprint. Then you can stop and Gian on the side of the road. That's your Max HR. 

You can get there faster by doing it on the hill.  I think I remember reading you want to do at least 2-3 minutes of exercise to get up there. You won't hit your max simply by running a 400m all out. You need to push really, really hard for at least 2-3 minutes, THEN sprint. 

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Posted (edited)

The gold standard for finding your maximal heart rate is a treadmill stress test in a lab, but you can simulate one on your own with a heart-rate monitor. At a track, do a warmup mile or two, followed by a mile at tempo pace, then gradually increase your speed over 400 meters before running a final quarter all out. "After every 100 meters during the last 400, look at your monitor and accelerate," says Atlanta-based coach Roy Benson. The highest number on your monitor will be close to your maximum heart rate. Once you know your true rate, you only need to update it every five years to see the effect of aging on your max heart rate.

Here you go

 

Here's another one, but f that noise.

 

Warm up for 15 minutes on a flat surface. Build up to your usual training pace.

Choose a hill that will take more than 2 minutes to climb. Run up the hill once (for at least 2 minutes), building to as hard a pace as you estimate you could hold for 20 minutes. (You don’t have to keep running for 20 minutes, you just need to build up to a pace that you could hold for at least 20 minutes.) Return to the base of the hill.

Run up the hill again with a faster pace. Get your heart going as hard as you can, building up to a pace you estimate you would be able to hold for 3 kilometres. Observe your highest heart rate on the display.Your max HR is approximately 10 beats higher than the now-noted value.

Run back down the hill, allowing your heart rate to drop 30–40 beats per minute from where it was.

Run up the hill once again at a pace that you can only hold for 1 minute. Try to run halfway up the hill. Observe your highest heart rate. This brings you close to your maximum heart rate. You can use this value as your max HR to set your heart rate zones.

Make sure you cool down for a minimum of 10 minutes.

Edited by gianmarco
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5 hours ago, gianmarco said:

I don't. Was going to play with it later today so I'll check. If it starts to feel difficult at all, slow down. Or even just walk the hill.  Think of today as giving your body rest even though you're running. It takes discipline.

Took this advice.  It was super easy not to go hard, and made easier by the fact that my watch gave me a low battery warning and prompted me to go to power saving mode about a mile in - and promptly turned off strava.  I turned it back on at a couple spots but mostly just ran slow and even walked parts of the big hills.  I had planned to keep my hear rate low but did crack once..  A couple women were out walking and turned ahead of me - probably mother daughter, one maybe in her 50s and the other maybe 30 and I realized that my range is wider than it used to be.  But more importantly another younger dude came barreling past all 3 of us and didn't give us the covid 6 feet, then slowed down and started walking a little ways ahead. So when I got to the top of the hill I started jogging again, and as I passed the ladies I was like watch this guy start running... he's gonna turn, see an old fat guy pass him and be like no fn way... the women started laughing and I just booked it, and sure enough he turned and started running but way too late so even though I'm pretty slow, I dusted him and he started jogging diagonally across the street and then just went back to walking and I pumped my fists in the air for Victory and I'm sure the women got a kick out of that. 

It was weird going the opposite direction, my route is four sided but the longest part is usually main street back to my road, and instead I started with that... it seemed like it took forever but once i turn it's basically half way through the run so I was surprised when I got there.  Also weird seeing spots that seemed flat to me and then realizing they were slight downhills... but mostly it was just nice holding the biggest hills til the end and finishing on a mostly downhill mile back to my house... fun stuff and nice to finish without being sore or hurt...

Thanks to everyone who weighed in or reads my little training run reports or clicks kudos in strava it's appreciated.  Hope I'm not annoying anyone with my eager puppy routine but it's been a fun experience 

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7 minutes ago, Juxtatarot said:

Boston Fred’s first race report is going to be looooooong.

I had a couple race reports from a 5k series i did years ago, including the race i showed up late to, there were no runners or signs anywhere so I just ran the route since I was already there, and then I saw all the young speedsters running towards me and realized that the theme that day was that they were running the race route backwards, so I rosey ruized it and just turned around and joined them

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