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MAD's ROUND 2!! # 1's have been posted!! (2 Viewers)

he Seldom SceneCharlie SteinerAfter Midnight
My memory ain't what it used to be, but could have sworn this was already on a list previously.
I may have linked this one in another thread, but haven't Had it in any other countdown list. Maybe there's another Seldom Scene fan here that did.
 
he Seldom SceneCharlie SteinerAfter Midnight
My memory ain't what it used to be, but could have sworn this was already on a list previously.
I may have linked this one in another thread, but haven't Had it in any other countdown list. Maybe there's another Seldom Scene fan here that did.
I went back. I was thinking of "Lay Down Sally", another "Clapton" song.
 
#6's PLAYLIST
Kid RocksnellmanSingle Father
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Single Father

Kid Rock · Song · 2003
spotifycdn.com%2Fcdn%2Fimages%2Ffavicon32.b64ecc03.png open.spotify.com

Hopefully my top 6 will show a different side of Kid Rock. This song has a lot of meaning to me as I went through a divorce in 2001 with 2 young daughters. I then had to make a tough decision to move 4 hours away from them (I will get into that later) and didn't get to see them near as often during the school year. They also had plenty of questions for dad. Hindsight is always 20/20 and I have been very happily married now for 18 years to my 2nd wife and my daughters have turned into amazing young women, but it still tugs a little bit when this song plays.
 
Talking Heads
#6 The Big Country

This is a wrap on More Songs About Buildings and Food (i.e., 5th of 5). The song is basically a big F U to "flyover country", and, as a city kid, I'm ok with that.
“The Big Country” is as lucid (and twangy) as Byrne gets: “I wouldn’t live there if you paid me,” he pronounces outright in the surprisingly laidback chorus. He borrowed the phrase “the big country” from Roxy Music’s Country Life closer “Prairie Rose,” where it refers to Texas, but as far as Byrne’s concerned, it’s any place you’d fly over without feeling much curiosity. It’s a barbed judgement he sings with relative peace, like someone relieved they live amid the move and hustle of New York City instead of, y’know, America.

Then we come to the farmlands
And the undeveloped areas
And I have learned
How these things work together
I see the parkway
That passes through them all
And I have learned
How to look at these things and I say

I wouldn't live there if you paid me
I wouldn't live like that, no siree
 
Talking Heads
#6 The Big Country

This is a wrap on More Songs About Buildings and Food (i.e., 5th of 5). The song is basically a big F U to "flyover country", and, as a city kid, I'm ok with that.
“The Big Country” is as lucid (and twangy) as Byrne gets: “I wouldn’t live there if you paid me,” he pronounces outright in the surprisingly laidback chorus. He borrowed the phrase “the big country” from Roxy Music’s Country Life closer “Prairie Rose,” where it refers to Texas, but as far as Byrne’s concerned, it’s any place you’d fly over without feeling much curiosity. It’s a barbed judgement he sings with relative peace, like someone relieved they live amid the move and hustle of New York City instead of, y’know, America.

Then we come to the farmlands
And the undeveloped areas
And I have learned
How these things work together
I see the parkway
That passes through them all
And I have learned
How to look at these things and I say

I wouldn't live there if you paid me
I wouldn't live like that, no siree

This was the first song I thought of when one of the previous Talking Heads posts claimed that "Road to Nowhere" was the group's first anthem.
 
Röyksopp
6 - Happy Up Here - Vocals by Röyksopp

Year - 2009
Appears on - Junior
Vocalist - Röyksopp
Key Lyric - Would you talk to me
Would you vote for me
Im ready for it!
You know I really like it
I know I'll always be here
You know it makes my heart beat
You know I'm happy up here

Notes

1- As mentioned last song, this heavily samples Parliaments “Do that Stuff”, hence songwriting credits for George Clinton Jr, Garry M Shider and Bernard B Worrell, as well as Röyksopp

2- Amazing song live with the whole audience chanting “I’m Ready for It”

3- From oldtimemusic.com. More than you ever needed to know
Röyksopp, the Norwegian electronic music duo, is known for their unique blend of dreamy melodies and mesmerizing beats. One of their most popular songs, “Happy Up Here,” has captivated listeners around the world since its release in 2009. Behind the catchy tunes lies a deeper meaning that resonates with the audience. Let’s delve into the story behind this enigmatic track.



Written by Torbjørn Brundtland and Svein Berge, the duo behind Röyksopp, “Happy Up Here” emerged as a reflection of their desire to bring joy and escape to their listeners. The song draws inspiration from the chaotic nature of the modern world. Through its upbeat tempo and playful melodies, the track serves as a sonic refuge from the daily struggles of life.



Amidst the chaos, “Happy Up Here” encourages listeners to find solace in moments of happiness and positivity. The lyrics, though simple, carry a profound message: life may throw challenges our way, but it is important to hold on to those moments that bring us joy. Röyksopp invites their audience to embrace a carefree state of mind, allowing the music to transport them to a place where worries fade away.



In a fast-paced and demanding world, “Happy Up Here” serves as a reminder of the power of escapism through music. The electronic beats and uplifting melody provide a break from reality, allowing listeners to immerse themselves in a euphoric sound journey. The track becomes a temporary respite, refreshing the mind and providing a sense of release.



“Happy Up Here” is characterized by its infectious blend of electronic beats, catchy synth melodies, and sampled vocal snippets. These elements come together to create an unmistakably joyful atmosphere. The song effortlessly blends nostalgia with a futuristic sound, showcasing Röyksopp’s ability to craft captivating compositions.



Röyksopp’s “Happy Up Here” has left an indelible mark on listeners worldwide. Its euphoric energy and positive message have resonated with people from all walks of life. The song serves as a reminder that happiness can be found in the simplest of things, providing a much-needed boost during challenging times.



1. What is the inspiration behind the lyrics of “Happy Up Here”?



The lyrics of “Happy Up Here” are inspired by the desire to escape from the chaos of the world and find joy in the present moment. Röyksopp wanted to create a track that would uplift their audience and offer a temporary respite from the challenges of daily life.



2. What makes “Happy Up Here” stand out among Röyksopp’s discography?

“Happy Up Here” stands out in Röyksopp’s discography for its distinctive blend of euphoric melodies and infectious beats. The song captures the essence of their style, creating a balance between dreamy electronic elements and a playful atmosphere.



3 How has “Happy Up Here” impacted the electronic music scene?

“Happy Up Here” has had a significant impact on the electronic music scene, influencing other artists and inspiring a wave of joyful and uplifting tracks. Its success helped solidify Röyksopp’s reputation as pioneers of the genre and paved the way for their continued musical exploration.

4. Can you describe the sound of “Happy Up Here”?

The sound of “Happy Up Here” can be described as a blend of energetic electronic beats, catchy synth melodies, and sampled vocal snippets. It combines nostalgic elements with futuristic sounds, creating a unique sonic experience for the listener.

5. What emotions does “Happy Up Here” evoke?

“Happy Up Here” evokes a range of positive emotions, including joy, nostalgia, and a sense of escapism. The upbeat tempo and playful melodies contribute to a carefree and uplifting atmosphere, allowing listeners to momentarily forget their worries and immerse themselves in the music.

  1. How does “Happy Up Here” fit into Röyksopp’s overall musical style?
“Happy Up Here” is a testament to Röyksopp’s signature style, with its dreamy melodies and captivating electronic soundscapes. While the duo has explored various genres throughout their career, this track showcases their ability to create catchy and uplifting compositions that resonate with a wide range of listeners.

7. What message do Röyksopp aim to convey through “Happy Up Here”?

Through “Happy Up Here,” Röyksopp aims to convey a message of resilience and the importance of embracing moments of happiness in life. The song encourages listeners to find solace in music and to cultivate a positive mindset, even in the face of adversity.

8. How does “Happy Up Here” make listeners feel?

“Happy Up Here” has a contagious energy that makes listeners feel uplifted and inspired. The combination of the upbeat tempo, lively melodies, and positive message creates a sense of euphoria, making it an ideal track to boost one’s mood or accompany moments of celebration.

9. Can you describe the impact of “Happy Up Here” on the listener’s state of mind?

“Happy Up Here” has the power to transport listeners into a carefree state of mind. Its infectious melodies and joyful atmosphere provide a temporary escape from reality, allowing listeners to momentarily detach from their worries and embrace a more positive outlook.

10. What role does “Happy Up Here” play in Röyksopp’s live performances?

“Happy Up Here” often takes center stage in Röyksopp’s live performances, serving as a highlight that gets the crowd dancing and singing along. Its vibrant energy and catchy hooks make it a fan favorite, creating an electrifying atmosphere during concerts.

11. What sets “Happy Up Here” apart from other feel-good songs?

“Happy Up Here” sets itself apart from other feel-good songs through its unique combination of electronic elements and dreamy melodies. Röyksopp’s attention to detail and ability to create a balance between nostalgia and futuristic sounds result in a track that stands the test of time.



12. Can you explain the lasting appeal of “Happy Up Here”?

The lasting appeal of “Happy Up Here” can be attributed to its ability to evoke joy and nostalgia in listeners. The song possesses a timeless quality, allowing it to resonate with new generations of music enthusiasts while still captivating longtime fans. Its optimistic message continues to strike a chord with audiences worldwide.



About The Author



Allan Frederick

Allan Frederick is a frequent contributor to OldTimeMusic. OldTimeMusic, your go-to source for music insights since 1998. We're a passionate community of music enthusiasts and talented instrument players, sharing the meanings and emotions behind songs, highlighting the best tracks and albums in music history, as well as providing the latest music news and instrument tips
.

Running Vocal Count
Röyksopp - 8
Robyn - 5
Susanne Sundfør - 4
Karin Dreijer - 2
Maurissa Rose - 1
Gunhild Ramsay Kovacs - 1
Alison Goldfrapp - 1
Jamie Irrepressible - 1
Karen Harding - 1
Kate Havnevik - 1
Sample - 1
Instrumental - 3

Where to find
Melody A.M - 1
The Understanding - 2
Röyksopp’s Night Out - 1
Back to Mine Series - 1
Junior - 3
Senior - 1
Late Night Tales Series - 2
Do It Again EP - 3
The Inevitable End - 2
Profound Mysteries I - 0
Profound Mysteries II - 2
Profound Mysteries III - 5
Other/Non Album Songs - 3

Year
1999 - 1
2001 - 0
2002 - 1
2005 - 2
2006 - 1
2007 - 1
2009 - 3
2010 - 1
2013 - 2
2014 - 4
2016 - 2
2022 - 8

Next up…Geico anyone?
 
Known-to-me favorites from #6:

Delirious
The Big Country
Guinnevere -- One of the best examples of the weird guitar tunings Crosby used
Ziggy Stardust
Slow Hand -- Did you know Conway Twitty covered this and changed the lyrics to the man's perspective? https://open.spotify.com/track/2h1Xj6D76ygKS3tu9DgIY5?si=ee79908382514ffe
Pink Houses
Say Hello 2 Heaven
Go With the Flow
December
Sowing the Seeds of Love -- their attempt to replicate Sgt Pepper's in the '80s worked better than XTC's did
Dream Police
Paradise
I Won't Back Down
Testament to Youth in Verse
Tarot Woman -- the entire Rising album is so badass
 
6. That's Entertainment
Album: Sound Affects (1980)
Released as a single? Yes (UK #21 as an import)

This song is one of The Jam's most revered. Not only was it beloved by their fanbase, who put it on the British charts despite it not being released as a single domestically, but it has resonated with rock's historians. BBC Radio 2 named it the 43rd greatest song of all time in 2004. That same year, Rolling Stone ranked it #306 on its list of the 500 greatest songs of all time. And The Guardian ranked it #1 on their list of Paul Weller's best songs. They said:

It’s a very close-run thing – indeed there are Weller songs that didn’t make this list that people might easily claim as their favourite, with Strange Town, The Changingman and Speak Like a Child among them – but That’s Entertainment nudges in front. Apparently written in 10 minutes, while drunk, it’s a cynical depiction of the limitations of working-class life that also captures a universal sense of longing and restriction – is that all there is? – in a series of blunt, but memorable, images. “Pissing down with rain on a boring Wednesday”, “A hot summer’s day and sticky black Tarmac”, “Watching the telly and thinking about your holidays”. To put it in equally blunt terms: what a f#cking great song.

In other words, it's kind of the urban British equivalent of Pink Houses.

One of the rare Jam songs featuring acoustic guitar, with electric guitar only appearing in the last verse, played backwards, That's Entertainment puts its melody and lyrics at the forefront, and both are incredible. The song resonated immediately upon the release of Sound Affects, and after the fanbase made Start! the band's second consecutive UK #1, they tracked down every copy they could find of an import single of this song, pushing it to UK #21. (The song received a proper UK single release twice after the band's demise but did not crack the UK top 40 either time.) It was the highest-charting import single in UK chart history up to that point, a record that The Jam broke themselves 2 years later when an import single of Just Who Is That 5 O'Clock Hero? hit #8.

Brits of a certain generation know all of these words by heart:

A police car and a screaming siren
A pneumatic drill and ripped up concrete
A baby wailing and stray dog howling
The screech of brakes and lamp light blinking

That's entertainment, that's entertainment

A smash of glass and the rumble of boots
An electric train and a ripped up phone booth
Paint splattered walls and the cry of a tomcat
Lights going out and a kick in the balls

I tell ya that's entertainment, that's entertainment

Days of speed and slow time Mondays
Pissing down with rain on a boring Wednesday
Watching the news and not eating your tea
A freezing cold flat and damp on the walls

I say that's entertainment, that's entertainment

Waking up at six AM on a cool warm morning
Opening the windows and breathing in petrol
An amateur band rehearsing in a nearby yard
Watching the tele and thinking about your holidays

That's entertainment, that's entertainment

La la la la la la
La la la la la la
La la la la la la
La la la la la la

Waking up from bad dreams and smoking cigarettes
Cuddling a warm girl and smelling stale perfume
A hot summer's day and sticky black tarmac
Feeding ducks in the park and wishing you were far away

That's entertainment, that's entertainment

Two lovers kissing amongst the scream of midnight
Two lovers missing the tranquility of solitude
Getting a cab and travelling on buses
Reading the graffiti about slashed seat affairs

I tell ya that's entertainment, that's entertainment

La la la la la la
La la la la la la
La la la la la la
La la la la la la
La la la la la la
La la la la la la
La la la la la la
La la la la la la
La la la la la la
La la la la la la
La la la la la la


Weller continues to perform the song live, and it was one of just three Jam tunes he played when I saw him in 2008 in NYC. It was the first song of the encore. The crowd, which was at least 50% British expats, went bonkers and sang along to every word.

Music video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m-H0uIH5HHQ
Demo version that appears on the Snap compilation and the Direction Reaction Creation box set (faster, with more prominent drums): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZkVEtyevWsk
Alternate version ("The Sound of the Jam version") that appears on the Sound of the Jam and Gold compilations (no bass, percussion or backwards electric guitar): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CcmrxZdBG8o
Dig the New Breed version: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wh8YsAn6oz8
Fire and Skill 1981 disc (with Tales from the Riverbank): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RORXOKWShBM
Version from Weller's Days of Speed live album, from the first tour where he started playing Jam songs again (and whose title comes from this song): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L5DOSX4x8nA
Weller performance with Noel Gallagher in 2006: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H4b48Jx7Un0

Cover #6: Rain
Demo from the sessions for Sound Affects (1980); appears on the deluxe version of that album and the Direction Reaction Creation box set
Writers: John Lennon and Paul McCartney
Original or best known version: The Beatles

The Jam's take on the psychedelic Beatles classic (#5 on my list in Zegras11's Beatles countdown) offers both adventurous noise and driving rock beats, much like many of the originals that ended up on Sound Affects, the sessions for which generated this cover. Weller's vocal seems a little "off" or restrained at times, but this song is supposed to sound off-kilter so it's not a flaw.

At #5, my highest ranking non-single. Of the top 5, four songs are absolutely blistering post-punk and the fifth song is very different from that.
 
Saw a young girl at the supermarket the other day with a navy blue shirt on that caught my eye for some reason—I think there was a catchy, familiar slogan on the back. I sort of kept looking and on the front or the sleeve (I wasn't staring) it said "Tears for Fears," which normally wouldn't be notable but she was (1) pretty young and (2) the "For" wasn't capitalized, which I'd never noticed before. I looked a little longer, and sure it enough, it was referencing the band.

Anyway, "Sowing" is a memorable track.
 
6. That's Entertainment

I always tried to get further into The Jam through this song, and I guess the write-up lets me know why I was having so much trouble. Acoustic and experimental. If it were 1980, I would be the guy hollering out "No new stuff!"

But then I'd get pissed on, so there would be my comeuppance.

"Down in the Tube Station at Midnight" was also an unsettlingly and stridently sociopolitical track, but an interesting one to listen to. Nice bass.
 
6. That's Entertainment

I always tried to get further into The Jam through this song, and I guess the write-up lets me know why I was having so much trouble. Acoustic and experimental. If it were 1980, I would be the guy hollering out "No new stuff!"

But then I'd get pissed on, so there would be my comeuppance.

"Down in the Tube Station at Midnight" was also an unsettlingly and stridently sociopolitical track, but an interesting one to listen to. Nice bass.
I pegged your alter ego and OTB as the ones who would be down with the 1977-78 stuff but maybe not what came after that.
 
I pegged your alter ego

My alter ego is Dinah Shore

(Dead Kennedys reference very few will get)

"Whose alter ego is Dinah Shore? Ah, notice the fists didn't go up so quickly this time!" - Jello Biafra in a live performance off of Give Me Convenience or Give Me Death

But yeah, probably wouldn't be as big a fan of the stuff that came post-'78 given what I've heard. I think otb might, actually. I'm just not sure which songs or why he'd prefer them. Also, said alter ego is surprisingly beyond the whole punk/post-punk thing as a necessity for listening anymore. I've talked to him. He's just a weird guy.
 
#6 Sonoran Hope and Madness (off Sonoran Hope and Madness, 20)

Let her burn you!
Let her bleach you!
Let her lead you so very far away no one can reach you!
Spread out wild and wander
And may everything you poison come back stronger...


(Youtube Version) Sonoran Hope and Madness
(Live Version) Sonoran Hope and Madness - Roger Clyne & the Peacemakers

As hinted at the end of my previous write-up, this song is sort of a love letter to the Sonoran Desert. And, by extension, Mother Nature herself. Yes, the desert has volcanoes in the Pinacate region located at the border of Mexico and Arizona. Though it’s been roughly 20 million years since any were active.

Why I chose this:
This one’s relatively short, but fast-paced and up-tempo. It’s a song with a bit of a mariachi vibe. Which is only appropriate, as Clyne studied mariachi music while at Arizona State University, as part of a Spanish immersion class. It’s a very lively song, if one that slows down at parts like a cool breeze on a warm day.

At #5, we return to a song by The Refreshments. It’s the type of song that you can’t really put a name to.
 
I pegged your alter ego

My alter ego is Dinah Shore

(Dead Kennedys reference very few will get)

"Whose alter ego is Dinah Shore? Ah, notice the fists didn't go up so quickly this time!" - Jello Biafra in a live performance off of Give Me Convenience or Give Me Death

But yeah, probably wouldn't be as big a fan of the stuff that came post-'78 given what I've heard. I think otb might, actually. I'm just not sure which songs or why he'd prefer them. Also, said alter ego is surprisingly beyond the whole punk/post-punk thing as a necessity for listening anymore. I've talked to him. He's just a weird guy.
OTB said there were certain popular Jam songs that he wasn't into, but other than that he likes most of their stuff.
 
This one’s relatively short, but fast-paced and up-tempo. It’s a song with a bit of a mariachi vibe. Which is only appropriate, as Clyne studied mariachi music while at Arizona State University, as part of a Spanish immersion class. It’s a very lively song, if one that slows down at parts like a cool breeze on a warm day.

For a few seconds in the intro, I thought it was a Los Lobos song I'd ranked and forgot
 
Talking Heads
#6 The Big Country

This is a wrap on More Songs About Buildings and Food (i.e., 5th of 5). The song is basically a big F U to "flyover country", and, as a city kid, I'm ok with that.

Are you sure that's his intent or am I giving him too much credit for not being so obtuse that he would pen that without self-reflection of any sort? The rest of the lyrics aren't adding up to that sort of animosity in the declaration. There are textual clues there that he's not saying that at all and that our Pitchfork interpreter is failing miserably at the perceived traditional city/country animosity dichotomy here.

Then again, he could just be being sort of an *******. It's entirely possible. I somehow doubt it, but not knowing enough about Byrne, I can't say for certain.
 
Talking Heads
#6 The Big Country

This is a wrap on More Songs About Buildings and Food (i.e., 5th of 5). The song is basically a big F U to "flyover country", and, as a city kid, I'm ok with that.

Are you sure that's his intent or am I giving him too much credit for not being so obtuse that he would pen that without self-reflection of any sort? The rest of the lyrics aren't adding up to that sort of animosity in the declaration. There are textual clues there that he's not saying that at all and that our Pitchfork interpreter is failing miserably at the perceived traditional city/country animosity dichotomy here.

Then again, he could just be being sort of an *******. It's entirely possible. I somehow doubt it, but not knowing enough about Byrne, I can't say for certain.

Why can't it be both? :D

I found this blurb from allmusic.com:
I wrote "The Big Country" about hating that kind of stuff. I thought I had to be fair. I hoped that the description would sound almost clinical. Benign and sympathetic, but still kind of clinical. And then all of a sudden to have this extreme emotion attached to it I thought was kind of a shock, because there was nothing leading up to it; there was no reason given for it at all."

So I think back in 1978, Byrne did indeed feel that way. However, I think by 1985 (when David Gans book Talking Heads, The Band and Their Music was written/released) he'd reconsidered
So Byrne seems indeed to be the narrator, though one who has gone through a process of self-discovery; he writes about his past ignorance -- disdain and hard feelings that he now (having written the song) realizes are unattractive and destructive.
 
CSNYjwbGuinevere
My favorite CSN song - so hauntingly beautiful.

I'll quote your post to give some thoughts. Yea, this is probably Crosby's best song. Like Pip mentioned, it's in a weird tuning, and the lyrics could mean a ton of things, but according to Crosby it's about three women he loved: Joni Mitchell, Christine Hinton (who ws killed in a car accident), and one he doesn't mention. I like the twin lead vocals by Crosby and Nash. I've said this a few times, but all four of these guys could really write and sing. Truly a supergroup.
 
Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night SweatsAAABatteriesNothing to Show

Nothing to Show For is possibly the first top 10 song from Rateliff that casual fans won't be familiar with. I don't have a lot to say about it other than I find it awesome. If you've not heard it before I recommend using the Spotify link - the YT link is a rooftop acoustic version that I personally really like but not sure it does the song justice that the studio version does.
 
round 17

Known Favs:

Battle for who could care less- Ben Folds- Top 10 for me
Falling to Pieces- Faith No More- forgot about this jam
She's so Shy- Pointer Sisters- honestly had no idea this was them
Anna Molly- Incubus- another solid tune
Seasons- Chris Cornell- this one is so damn good. probably top 10 for me as well

New to me favs:

River of Fools- Los Lobos - these guys keep surprising me
Counterclockwise- Roger Clyne
When they come for me- Linkin Park- never gave these guys a chance ... not my type of music but I liked this one
Gonna Raise Hell- Cheap trick- another band I never really listened much to other than the hits. solid.
From Blown Speakers- The New Pornographers- back to back like from me last 2 rounds

on to 16s
 
File under things that torque my jaw: While continuing to peruse Neko Case's catalog, I discovered a great big whiff on my top-31 list; a song that likely would have cracked my top-5. I'll name the tune after the #1s are revealed.

For the fans who think the best Neko is to be found when she sheds the restrictor plates from her vocal cords, track 6 is for you. From her first album, The Virginian, released in 1997.

Duchess:
 
File under things that torque my jaw: While continuing to peruse Neko Case's catalog, I discovered a great big whiff on my top-31 list; a song that likely would have cracked my top-5. I'll name the tune after the #1s are revealed.
Join the club. One of my upcoming picks is not on Spotify. I'll be putting the just-discovered pick in for that playlist.
 
#5's PLAYLIST
#5 -
PrinceRamsay Hunt ExperienceKiss
Tanya DonellyplinkoNot Too Soon
The Real Ramona, 1991
Talking Headskupcho1Once in a Lifetime
Sia FurlerScoresmanCheap Thrills
Los LoboseephusSaint Behind the Glass
The Seldom SceneCharlie SteinerAnd on Bass
Kid RocksnellmanDrinking Beer with Dad
Against Me!scorchyTrue Trans Soul Rebel
MastodonKarmaPolice Octopus Has No Friends
Neko CaseMister CIABad Luck
Faith No MoreJBBreakfastClubMidlife Crisis
black midiJuxtatarotWelcome To Hell
Nina SimoneDon QuixoteMy Sweet Lord / Today is a Killer, from Emergency Ward!
Beastie BoysYo MamaSure Shot
Drive-By TruckersDr. Octopus******* Lonely Love
Jimmy Buffet-OZ-Changes in Latitudes
The JamPip's InvitationSet the House Ablaze
RöyksoppJMLs secret identity5 - Remind Me feat Erlend Øye
Nick Cave and the Bad SeedssalterifficDeanna
CSNYjwbOur House
Roger ClyneMt. ManSin Nombre
David BermanThe Dreaded MarcoThe Wild Kindness
David BowieBinky the DoormatLife On Mars
Pointer SistersMrs. RannousFire

IncubusMAC_32Privilege
John MellencamptuffnuttHurts So Good

Sufjan Stevens Ilov80sReflexion
Mike ShinodaJust Win BabyFaint
Chris Cornell Raging Weasel Call Me A Dog
Josh HommetitusbrambleWannabe In LA
Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night SweatsAAABatteriesTrying So Hard Not to Know
Kim MitchellSullieIn the Stars Tonight
Thin LizzyzamboniThe Rocker
Collective SoulfalguyHeavy
Tears for FearsJohn Maddens LunchboxEverybody wants to Rule the World (Vocals Curt)
Cheap TrickFairWarningELO Kiddies
John Prinelandrys hatHello In There

Ben FoldsHov34Philosophy
Tom PettyZegras11Runnin' Down a Dream
Scott Hutchison snevenelevenLos Angeles, Be Kind
The New PornographersNorthern VoiceSlow Descent Into Alcoholism
John Lee HookerDrIan MalcolmBackbiters and Syndicators

Rainbow Sam Quentin Stargazer
Pyotr Ilyich TchaikovskyzazaleString Quartet No. 2 in F Major, Op. 22, TH 122: I. Adagio - Moderato assai
 
Pointer Sisters #5 - Fire

By Bruce Springsteen, obviously.
The Pointer Sisters played at a place called the Attic in Greenville, NC in 1981. That is where I went to college, and I spent many nights at the Attic during my time in Greenville. I didn't get to see them, though, because I didn't get there until 1984. It would have been awesome to have see them, especially at that venue, and they played on my birthday! Anyway, this is a great video of them performing "Fire" there in 1981.
 
Beastie Boys #5 - Sure Shot
Album - Ill Communication (1994)

Peacockin'
Ad-Rock: 1, MCA: 1, Mike D: 1, Beastie Boys: 0, Greater NYC: 0

Name Rockin'
Dr. John, Mr. Zu Zu, Lee Dorsey, Mario, Kojak, John Woo, Rod Carew, Cane, Dougie, Lee Perry, Vaughn Bode, Cheech, Ma Bell

Rhyme Squawkin'
I want to say a little something that's long overdue
The disrespect to women has got to be through
To all the mothers and the sisters and the wives and friends
I want to offer my love and respect to the end


Yo Mama Talkin'
Yet another awesome song by these guys. It’s got some peacockin’, it’s got incredible name Rockin’, IT’S GOT THE FLUTE!
 
5. And on Bass

This one hurts, because in hindsight this is where the Seldom Scene jumped the shark.

This is the first song from their 20th Anniversary Concert album (1992).

We now fast forward 11 years and a couple of lineup changes. Exit Tom Gray and Phil Rosenthal, enter Lou Reid and T. Michael Coleman. The reasons for the departure of Gray and Rosenthal were never specified but were amicable, and while the new additions were fine, the previous lineup changes were more subtle.


Spotlight #7: Lou Reid.

Born Louis Reid Pyrtle in western North Carolina, he was the first bona fide mountain-ish born hillbilly to join the band. On his own, he built an impressive resume, starting at age 24 and working for a time with Ricky Skaggs until joining the 'Scene in '86 when Rosenthal left. He definitely brought a different vibe, though still remained within the band's aesthetic. He left in '93 to tour with Ricky Skaggs but returned in '96. As the 'Scene still retained their part-time status, Lou was able to continue with other projects while still retaining his place with the band; as of this current era, he has been a member of the band longer than most of the founding members.

Spotlight #8: T. Michael Coleman

Another North Carolina native, Coleman worked with and was playing for Doc Watson's band when he joined the 'Scene in '86 as Tom Gray's replacement. Coleman's instrument of choice was the electric bass, which may have upset the purists, but ultimately it fit in nicely and was a great foil for Duffey on stage. In his early days with the band, he composed this little ditty as his way of introducing himself and breaking the ice with the audience. I had been an aspiring bass player for a short time, so this tune appealed to me, and I tend to like songs that at least try to be funny.

Fun fact for ya: Coleman is the father of actress Kelen Coleman; if her name doesn't sound familiar, fans of the US version of The Office will know her as Pam's cousin Isabel from the Niagra Falls story arc.
 
Selected favorites from the #6s. Running behind, so no shuffle this time around. It’ll return for #5 (through #2), for those that enjoy the shuffle adventures. Meanwhile, it was definitely another packed round. So many awesome songs that I knew and loved. Very hard to narrow it down, but I managed! I’m going six deep again, as will probably be the norm from here on out.


Familiar songs:
Delirious - Prince
Son of a Son of a Sailor - Jimmy Buffett
Dig, Lazarus, Dig - Nick Cave
Say Hello 2 Heaven - Temple of the Dog/Chris Cornell
Go With The Flow - QotSA/Josh Homme - It was even better to hear these two songs back to back!
Dream Police - Cheap Trick

New discoveries:
Aint Got No - I Got Life - Nina Simone
Oil and Water - Incubus
Back to Oz - Sufjan Stevens
Paradise - John Prine
Mess - Ben Folds
I’m In the Mood - John Lee Hooker
 

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