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Restaurant Talk - Modern Rules Of Dining (1 Viewer)

One I sometimes see I wish parents would do better with: Letting the very young child decide on the spot what they want while the server waits.

I understand kids need to learn social things and learn to order.

But it seems I sometimes see families order, and when it gets to the 4-year-old, and with no prep before, the question asked is, "Oliver, what would you like? And the server is forced to patiently wait there while the kid decides.

Work it out with Oliver before the server gets there and let him tell the server and maybe help him along but don't make the server wait there for the child to decide.

Basically, it's about being respectful to the server.
 
One I sometimes see I wish parents would do better with: Letting the very young child decide on the spot what they want while the server waits.

We did this and I agree with you, but be warned, it will potentially cost you. Nothing like having a 10 year old order an $80 dry aged ribeye :lmao:
 
One I sometimes see I wish parents would do better with: Letting the very young child decide on the spot what they want while the server waits.

I understand kids need to learn social things and learn to order.

But it seems I sometimes see families order, and when it gets to the 4-year-old, and with no prep before, the question asked is, "Oliver, what would you like? And the server is forced to patiently wait there while the kid decides.

Work it out with Oliver before the server gets there and let him tell the server and maybe help him along but don't make the server wait there for the child to decide.

Basically, it's about being respectful to the server.
At that point a parent will order for the child without any input from the child. (And often something the child doesn't like)
 
Another one on the ordering topic.

I'm not sure why but I see people who I know to be nice and kind and loving people be flip and demanding to servers.

Really nice people turn into little tyrants when the server appears and start the "Gimme a _______" barely acknowledging the server is a real person.

Or the Spalding, "I wanna..."


We need more @Judge Smails in cases like that.

It's not difficult. Look at the server. Smile. Say something like "Could I get a _________" or "May I have a __________".

You know, like you might actually talk to another human.
 
One I sometimes see I wish parents would do better with: Letting the very young child decide on the spot what they want while the server waits.

I understand kids need to learn social things and learn to order.

But it seems I sometimes see families order, and when it gets to the 4-year-old, and with no prep before, the question asked is, "Oliver, what would you like? And the server is forced to patiently wait there while the kid decides.

Work it out with Oliver before the server gets there and let him tell the server and maybe help him along but don't make the server wait there for the child to decide.

Basically, it's about being respectful to the server.
The adult that doesn’t know what they want is much worse than Oliver.
 
Pretty sure after 5 kids I could write a book of restaurant reviews based off nothing but their kids' menu offerings. Not all chicken tendies are created equal.....and some of the mac n cheese I've seen my kids order are what I imagine food in prison to be like.

We had a little family vacation to the Oregon Coast and hit up one of my very favorite restaurants for lunch. It's got a great kids' menu insomuch that there's more variety than most places that offer a kids' menu and kudos to them for having a veggie rice bowl as an option. That said, I had a big chuckle at one of the menu items and thought of this place.....anything seem silly on here to you? https://www.the-drift-inn.com/kids-menu/
 
One I sometimes see I wish parents would do better with: Letting the very young child decide on the spot what they want while the server waits.

I understand kids need to learn social things and learn to order.

But it seems I sometimes see families order, and when it gets to the 4-year-old, and with no prep before, the question asked is, "Oliver, what would you like? And the server is forced to patiently wait there while the kid decides.

Work it out with Oliver before the server gets there and let him tell the server and maybe help him along but don't make the server wait there for the child to decide.

Basically, it's about being respectful to the server.
The adult that doesn’t know what they want is much worse than Oliver.

True. That's another one.

If you're not ready to decide, let the server know when you think you'll be ready.
 
Another thought, usually the order decision is not life or death.

I get it, if you're visiting a super special place you've never been and you're likely never to be back again, yeah, put a bit of thought into it.

But that's pretty rare. Most times, pick a lane and order.

Again, it goes back to respecting the server. Don't make them wait on you.
 
Three common paths for me:

1. I looked at the menu in advance or I've been there before and know what I want
2. I'm having great discussions and didn't look at the menu - "I'm so sorry, can you give us 2-3 minutes, I hadn't even looked yet."
3. I'm struggling to choose between delicious things - "I'll go last, I'll decide by then" or "I'm between these two things - do you have a recommendation?" or "I'm between these two things, I don't want to know, just surprise me with one of them" (that last one could be super annoying to a server, so only use it when you already have rapport or they seem like they'd enjoy the freedom)
 
Pretty sure after 5 kids I could write a book of restaurant reviews based off nothing but their kids' menu offerings. Not all chicken tendies are created equal.....and some of the mac n cheese I've seen my kids order are what I imagine food in prison to be like.

We had a little family vacation to the Oregon Coast and hit up one of my very favorite restaurants for lunch. It's got a great kids' menu insomuch that there's more variety than most places that offer a kids' menu and kudos to them for having a veggie rice bowl as an option. That said, I had a big chuckle at one of the menu items and thought of this place.....anything seem silly on here to you? https://www.the-drift-inn.com/kids-menu/
The fruit?
 
Pretty sure after 5 kids I could write a book of restaurant reviews based off nothing but their kids' menu offerings. Not all chicken tendies are created equal.....and some of the mac n cheese I've seen my kids order are what I imagine food in prison to be like.

We had a little family vacation to the Oregon Coast and hit up one of my very favorite restaurants for lunch. It's got a great kids' menu insomuch that there's more variety than most places that offer a kids' menu and kudos to them for having a veggie rice bowl as an option. That said, I had a big chuckle at one of the menu items and thought of this place.....anything seem silly on here to you? https://www.the-drift-inn.com/kids-menu/
The fruit?

Yeah, I thought $4 for HALF of a pear was a little.....egregious. $5 for some frozen blueberries also a little outlandish. But I will say their chicken strips and fries are banging and totally worth the $7.50. Big chunks of white meat chicken fried to perfection. Which I know because my son took his leftovers home and the midnight snack monster got a hold of them. :bag:
 
A personal rule I follow is “Always be nice to people who are serving you food.” Not just because it’s a nice thing to do, but because people who are handling your food have a lot of power.
 
One I sometimes see I wish parents would do better with: Letting the very young child decide on the spot what they want while the server waits.

I understand kids need to learn social things and learn to order.

But it seems I sometimes see families order, and when it gets to the 4-year-old, and with no prep before, the question asked is, "Oliver, what would you like? And the server is forced to patiently wait there while the kid decides.

Work it out with Oliver before the server gets there and let him tell the server and maybe help him along but don't make the server wait there for the child to decide.

Basically, it's about being respectful to the server.
The adult that doesn’t know what they want is much worse than Oliver.
Absolutely, the waiter shouldn’t need to come back to the table multiple times due to indecision.

Sit down, and immediately peruse the drink and food menus. Make a plan, with a back up if your first choice doesn’t work, or an off-menu variable like specials is introduced.

Better yet, check out the menu before you’re seated.

Then order everything at once. The whole process should take no longer than 5 minutes.

Attentive waitstaff will have plenty of opportunities to prove their mettle during the meal. And you’ve just reduced potential interruptions, while you and your dining partners enjoy each others’ company, as stuff is being prepared.
 
One I sometimes see I wish parents would do better with: Letting the very young child decide on the spot what they want while the server waits.

I understand kids need to learn social things and learn to order.

But it seems I sometimes see families order, and when it gets to the 4-year-old, and with no prep before, the question asked is, "Oliver, what would you like? And the server is forced to patiently wait there while the kid decides.

Work it out with Oliver before the server gets there and let him tell the server and maybe help him along but don't make the server wait there for the child to decide.

Basically, it's about being respectful to the server.
The adult that doesn’t know what they want is much worse than Oliver.
Absolutely, the waiter shouldn’t need to come back to the table multiple times due to indecision.

Sit down, and immediately peruse the drink and food menus. Make a plan, with a back up if your first choice doesn’t work, or an off-menu variable like specials is introduced.

Better yet, check out the menu before you’re seated.

Then order everything at once. The whole process should take no longer than 5 minutes.

Attentive waitstaff will have plenty of opportunities to prove their mettle during the meal. And you’ve just reduced potential interruptions, while you and your dining partners enjoy each others’ company, as stuff is being prepared.
Sorta depends on the place, no? if i'm sitting down for a nice meal i'd rather not rush through everything.
 
One I sometimes see I wish parents would do better with: Letting the very young child decide on the spot what they want while the server waits.

I understand kids need to learn social things and learn to order.

But it seems I sometimes see families order, and when it gets to the 4-year-old, and with no prep before, the question asked is, "Oliver, what would you like? And the server is forced to patiently wait there while the kid decides.

Work it out with Oliver before the server gets there and let him tell the server and maybe help him along but don't make the server wait there for the child to decide.

Basically, it's about being respectful to the server.
The adult that doesn’t know what they want is much worse than Oliver.
Absolutely, the waiter shouldn’t need to come back to the table multiple times due to indecision.

Sit down, and immediately peruse the drink and food menus. Make a plan, with a back up if your first choice doesn’t work, or an off-menu variable like specials is introduced.

Better yet, check out the menu before you’re seated.

Then order everything at once. The whole process should take no longer than 5 minutes.

Attentive waitstaff will have plenty of opportunities to prove their mettle during the meal. And you’ve just reduced potential interruptions, while you and your dining partners enjoy each others’ company, as stuff is being prepared.
At our firm for events, this is when we make some time back. A senior person at the table will make the first food decision easy "two of every appetizer".
 
Another thought, usually the order decision is not life or death.

I get it, if you're visiting a super special place you've never been and you're likely never to be back again, yeah, put a bit of thought into it.

But that's pretty rare. Most times, pick a lane and order.

Again, it goes back to respecting the server. Don't make them wait on you.
 
One I sometimes see I wish parents would do better with: Letting the very young child decide on the spot what they want while the server waits.

I understand kids need to learn social things and learn to order.

But it seems I sometimes see families order, and when it gets to the 4-year-old, and with no prep before, the question asked is, "Oliver, what would you like? And the server is forced to patiently wait there while the kid decides.

Work it out with Oliver before the server gets there and let him tell the server and maybe help him along but don't make the server wait there for the child to decide.

Basically, it's about being respectful to the server.
The adult that doesn’t know what they want is much worse than Oliver.
Absolutely, the waiter shouldn’t need to come back to the table multiple times due to indecision.

Sit down, and immediately peruse the drink and food menus. Make a plan, with a back up if your first choice doesn’t work, or an off-menu variable like specials is introduced.

Better yet, check out the menu before you’re seated.

Then order everything at once. The whole process should take no longer than 5 minutes.

Attentive waitstaff will have plenty of opportunities to prove their mettle during the meal. And you’ve just reduced potential interruptions, while you and your dining partners enjoy each others’ company, as stuff is being prepared.
Sorta depends on the place, no? if i'm sitting down for a nice meal i'd rather not rush through everything.
I don’t think of it as rushing, as I don’t derive any pleasure from prolonged staring at menus, or delaying when I’m served.

It’s easy to take in the ambiance and enjoy company after ordering is completed. Maybe some desire suspense to build up before they receive their meal, but I’m usually hungry when I dine.
 
Again, it goes back to respecting the server. Don't make them wait on you.
I laughed cause you know, well, waiting is their job
Which is why I hate the term waiter. A good one isn't spending time waiting.

Like any job, particularly sales, it takes a lot of practice to make sure you are only spending time with decision makers ready to make a decision.

Kids do get tricky because I can't treat a kid like an adult. With an adult, if we've still got any hint of farting around after a couple of closing questions, I'm walking away. I exercise a little patience with kids.

The walk away, btw, is incredibly effective for producing decisions.
 
Again, it goes back to respecting the server. Don't make them wait on you.
I laughed cause you know, well, waiting is their job
Which is why I hate the term waiter. A good one isn't spending time waiting.

Like any job, particularly sales, it takes a lot of practice to make sure you are only spending time with decision makers ready to make a decision.

Kids do get tricky because I can't treat a kid like an adult. With an adult, if we've still got any hint of farting around after a couple of closing questions, I'm walking away. I exercise a little patience with kids.

The walk away, btw, is incredibly effective for producing decisions.
Understood. That's why I always say "Server".
 
One I sometimes see I wish parents would do better with: Letting the very young child decide on the spot what they want while the server waits.

I understand kids need to learn social things and learn to order.

But it seems I sometimes see families order, and when it gets to the 4-year-old, and with no prep before, the question asked is, "Oliver, what would you like? And the server is forced to patiently wait there while the kid decides.

Work it out with Oliver before the server gets there and let him tell the server and maybe help him along but don't make the server wait there for the child to decide.

Basically, it's about being respectful to the server.
The adult that doesn’t know what they want is much worse than Oliver.
Absolutely, the waiter shouldn’t need to come back to the table multiple times due to indecision.

Sit down, and immediately peruse the drink and food menus. Make a plan, with a back up if your first choice doesn’t work, or an off-menu variable like specials is introduced.

Better yet, check out the menu before you’re seated.

Then order everything at once. The whole process should take no longer than 5 minutes.

Attentive waitstaff will have plenty of opportunities to prove their mettle during the meal. And you’ve just reduced potential interruptions, while you and your dining partners enjoy each others’ company, as stuff is being prepared.
Sorta depends on the place, no? if i'm sitting down for a nice meal i'd rather not rush through everything.
I don’t think of it as rushing, as I don’t derive any pleasure from prolonged staring at menus, or delaying when I’m served.

It’s easy to take in the ambiance and enjoy company after ordering is completed. Maybe some desire suspense to build up before they receive their meal, but I’m usually hungry when I dine.
well a lot of times people are catching up, getting to know one another or whatever and it's not staring at menus, and sometimes people just enjoy going through the menu. It's fine that you don't like to do that but others may.
 
One I sometimes see I wish parents would do better with: Letting the very young child decide on the spot what they want while the server waits.

I understand kids need to learn social things and learn to order.

But it seems I sometimes see families order, and when it gets to the 4-year-old, and with no prep before, the question asked is, "Oliver, what would you like? And the server is forced to patiently wait there while the kid decides.

Work it out with Oliver before the server gets there and let him tell the server and maybe help him along but don't make the server wait there for the child to decide.

Basically, it's about being respectful to the server.
The adult that doesn’t know what they want is much worse than Oliver.
Absolutely, the waiter shouldn’t need to come back to the table multiple times due to indecision.

Sit down, and immediately peruse the drink and food menus. Make a plan, with a back up if your first choice doesn’t work, or an off-menu variable like specials is introduced.

Better yet, check out the menu before you’re seated.

Then order everything at once. The whole process should take no longer than 5 minutes.

Attentive waitstaff will have plenty of opportunities to prove their mettle during the meal. And you’ve just reduced potential interruptions, while you and your dining partners enjoy each others’ company, as stuff is being prepared.
Sorta depends on the place, no? if i'm sitting down for a nice meal i'd rather not rush through everything.
I don’t think of it as rushing, as I don’t derive any pleasure from prolonged staring at menus, or delaying when I’m served.

It’s easy to take in the ambiance and enjoy company after ordering is completed. Maybe some desire suspense to build up before they receive their meal, but I’m usually hungry when I dine.
well a lot of times people are catching up, getting to know one another or whatever and it's not staring at menus, and sometimes people just enjoy going through the menu. It's fine that you don't like to do that but others may.
Yea, if it is just me and the wife we regularly will just cruise through a dinner date in like 45 minutes. If I am out with friends, the dinner is typically the thing we are doing. Like instead of going to a show, or hanging at someone's house, we are hanging at the restaurant. I want to be there for almost 2 hours. And the longer we spend, the more we spend, but the more worthwhile that expense is
 
Big NO!!! to dogs in a restaurant! I've left pubs that allowed them and I certainly don't want poochie wandering around slobbering all over the place and shedding his fur into my food. People who bring dogs to restaurants are ignorant, entitled jagoffs in my book. Whats that? your little poochie never bit any one before?!? I guess I'm the first then. :mad:
We have lots of restaurants here that allow dogs in their outdoor eating area and it works out fine. Also a movie theatre that serves food and allows you to bring your dog. Never heard of a problem.
 

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