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krista4

In this thread I rank my favorite Beatles songs: 204-1.

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34 minutes ago, rockaction said:

Fun Fact A to Z: Table of Contents off of the Roots's Things Fall Apart features a belch at the beginning of the song. 

NSFW, like everything I post.  

I keep listening to this and can't hear it, but the good thing is I keep listening to it.  Love it.

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7 minutes ago, krista4 said:

I keep listening to this and can't hear it, but the good thing is I keep listening to it.  Love it.

Hey, k4, It's at 0:03-4 in, and he says "excuse me" under the muffled noise in the background. 

:) 

Also, love it too. One of my favorites from my twenties.  

Thanks for the shout.  

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10 minutes ago, rockaction said:

Hey, k4, It's at 0:03-4 in, and he says "excuse me" under the muffled noise in the background. 

:) 

Also, love it too. One of my favorites from my twenties.  

Thanks for the shout.  

Ah, that's the problem...either my computer or my internet blows, and every time I start a YouTube video, about 3-5 of the first seconds go blank for me.

All right, signing off for the evening having given plenty for people to chew on through the morning.  :)

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Sure. Word. Late West Coast night. Good night.   

:) Just listened to Anna and am combing through these songs. Please Please Me got whacked as bad as the White album. You are indeed a mid-Beatles person, eh?   

 

 

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10 minutes ago, rockaction said:

Sure. Word. Late West Coast night. Good night.   

:) Just listened to Anna and am combing through these songs. Please Please Me got whacked as bad as the White album. You are indeed a mid-Beatles person, eh?   

 

 

Yeah, I had no idea until I started posting these. I’m such a fan of almost all of it that I’ve never thought much about anything but the broad “early v late” distinction, with respect to which I’m pretty balanced.  As I started to firm up these rankings, though, it became clear that Rubber Soul and Revolver were dominating.  Smack dab in the middle.

ETA:  I think that means I’m dull.

Edited by krista4
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3 minutes ago, krista4 said:

Yeah, I had no idea until I started posting these. I’m such a fan of almost all of it that I’ve never thought much about anything but the broad “early v late” distinction, with respect to which I’m pretty balanced.  As I started to firm up these rankings, though, it became clear that Rubber Soul and Revolver were dominating.  Smack dab in the middle.

Awesome.

Love your rankings just because the fun of them. I love waltz time, though, so Baby's In Black was too low for my own taste, but tuff stuff for me. I'm such a sucker for waltzes and the music therein.    

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9 hours ago, krista4 said:

I’m going to keep trying to get this point across.

ETA:  I'm glad you laughed; I figured I could "pick on" you since you're such a GB of mine.  It's probably the lawyerly part of me being too into semantics, but this idea that anyone says a song "should" be higher/lower on a personal preference list doesn't make any sense to me.  

It's like when @Gr00vus posted his 50 favorite songs recently; I'd never have considered saying "you shouldn't have all those Sting songs on there."  If I were going to go in that direction, I'd have said, "Wow, you really like Sting a whole lot more than I do" or some such.  This is a little different in that I wouldn't have dreamed of saying anything negative in a thread where someone was just posting what they love the most, as opposed to this which is ranking a pre-made list, but still the concept of "should be" rather than "I'd do" eludes me in this context.

With the number of songs you're trying to assess, it's even tougher to say one is misranked, particularly when you're listing them according to your preference. To me, everything you've posted so far seems like the individual rankings don't really matter all that much, they're in a tier or two quality wise and rightfully lower down than what lies ahead. Seems good enough, no need to quibble about why one is at 190 and another is at 188.

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8 hours ago, wikkidpissah said:

Where's my hat?!

Usually with a hat like that you get a free bowl of soup.

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What do people typically use to discern mid- from late- Beatles?  Is it from White Album forward -- when they became more solo artists publishing together than collaborators?

To me it's always been early Beatles and then the drug albums, with Rubber Soul being the bridge you could include in either place.

Edited by Dinsy Ejotuz

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5 minutes ago, Dinsy Ejotuz said:

What do people typically use to discern mid- from late- Beatles?  Is it from White Album forward -- when they became more solo artists publishing together than collaborators?

To me it's always been early Beatles and then the drug albums, with Rubber Soul being the bridge you could include in either place.

Great point. I usually use Rubber Soul or Revolver as the cut-off point between what I volunteer myself for. I think Rubber Soul is really the album for me, frankly, though I've grown to appreciate Revolver as I age.  

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5 minutes ago, Dinsy Ejotuz said:

What do people typically use to discern mid- from late- Beatles?  Is it from White Album forward -- when they became more solo artists publishing together than collaborators?

To me it's always been early Beatles and then the drug albums, with Rubber Soul being the bridge you could include in either place.

I think that’s fair.  

For me (using the British issued LPs), peak “early Beatles” is Hard Day’s Night (criminally underrated and in my top 3-5 albums of theirs).  Beatles For Sale and Help are kind of middle Beatles transitional towards Rubber Soul when they really started finding their in-studio creativity.  Revolver is peak “creative middle era Beatles”, and Sgt Pepper not far behind.

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16 hours ago, krista4 said:

Look out, it's another cover song!

181.  Mr. Moonlight (Beatles for Sale, 1964)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

We're into a new tier of covers.  In these, I don't think the Beatles versions are worse, but they don't do anything to make the songs better, either.  

This one sounds awfully corny in some ways, in particular Paul's "roller rink" Hammond organ solo in the middle, but I suspect it's meant to be.  All the goofiness - why is George on African drum?  why is Ringo hitting those tom-toms so hard?  why is the harmony so monotone? oh no, here comes that organ solo - makes the energy of John's blistering vocals stand out even more.  John's commitment to this song makes it shine through the zaniness.

Mr. krista:  "Vocals are so great though.  He clearly loves that song more than anybody else in the band."

The original by Dr. Feelgood and the Interns has a similarly stellar vocal.   

Weird choice but I love it.  John's vocals here are outstanding.

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11 hours ago, krista4 said:

Back to the countdown!  We're going to pop our Sgt. Pepper's Cherry!

176.  Being For The Benefit Of Mr Kite!  (Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, 1967)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

It's getting really tough at this point, because I like all of these songs, and there's nothing left in the countdown that I'd turn off when it comes on (with one possible exception I'll mention when we get to it).  This is a John song with some of the hallmarks of a Paul song - the "circus" quality reminds me of Paul's dance-hall songs, and the invention of a new world is usually a Paul practice.  But was it an invention?  John admits that he cribbed most of the details from an 1800s circus poster he bought at an antique shop - from the Hendersons to Henry the Horse to the hogshead of real fire.  Interesting article and image of the poster here! 

John didn't particularly like the song and said he was "just going through the motions because we needed a new song."  I have a more favorable impression of the song than John does, as I love the creation of the circus atmosphere that makes me feel like I'm there (even though I hate circuses) - credit to George Martin for all of that.  I could listen to the part between 0:59-1:29 over and over - and I do - though I feel the ending soundscape starts to drag a little.  Don't sleep on the Paul's bass or Ringo's drums on this one.  We'll have to discuss Ringo on all of this album, as I think it's one of the many places where he really shines.

Mr. krista:  "Pretty good song about a circus.  Good circus song.  There’s probably a song somewhere about the Flying Wallendas that’s better."

Suggested covers:  I've studiously avoided this movie, but I like Eddie Izzard's version.  If only this were better quality - The Residents with the London Sinfonietta

 

 

Love this song. Need to absorb the rest of the list to see if it's too low, but it very well could be in the right spot....and that is scary.

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7 hours ago, krista4 said:

Let's clear out a few covers before morning.  These are all still in the category of songs that I think are terrific, but to which the Beatles covers don't add much new.  I didn't intend to have these covers bunched up like this, but when I look above them I can't say I prefer any of them to a Beatles original up there.   

But before we get to the covers, I need to post one of those very love-it-or-hate-it songs.  I happen to love it.

175.  You Know My Name (Look Up the Number) (Single, 1970)

Beatles:  Spotify  YouTube

I understand a lot of people hate this song, and in terms of "noise" songs a lot would put Mr. Kite above it, but...this song cracks me up. It always makes me laugh with its madness, and I'm fascinated every time I hear it.  One of the most bizarre facts about this to me is that it was the b-side to "Let It Be."  I can just imagine some sweet human buying that single and then freaking out over WTF was on the other side.

(Quick aside:  I've noticed that @DaVinci always mentions this song as his favorite, which I've always assumed was sarcasm, but I'd love to hear his thoughts on it either way.)

One of the main appeals to me of this song is that they sound like they're having such a damn great time.  And in 1967 (recorded three years before its release, btw), that's notable.  I'm also a fan of the Beatles and post-Beatles songs that sound like different songs mushed together - see, e.g., Band on the Run, You Never Give Me Your Money, etc.  Obviously I'm not saying this is on par with those, but I do love the songs that move from one segment to another, one tempo and feel to another, but somehow work, and the four-or-is-it-five separate parts of this keep me interested along the way.  I dunno; a lot of people think this one is nonsense, which I couldn't argue with, but hey, at one point Paul said that this was his favorite song of theirs, so I can't be completely off, right?  Paul's pretty weird, though.  Regardless, it's my favorite song that features a burp at the end.

Fun facts:  one of the many crazy sound effects on this song is Mal Evans either, depending upon what you believe, running a spade through some gravel or shaking a bag of some gravel.  In any case, gravel was a supporting vocal here.    Also, listen for Brian Jones of the Stones on sax.

Mr. krista:  "This is better if you imagine Muppets doing it."

Suggested cover:  After typing four earnest paragraphs about this, and thereafter checking the notes to find Mr. krista's comments (which are copied in full), I'm laughing too hard to look for a cover.  Maybe later.  (And when I just reminded him of his comment from months ago, I can't get him to stop singing this to me in an Animals-from-the-Muppets voice.)

This song brings back memories to me.   I was 11 years old and went to a used record store downtown with my big brother.  He was more into Dylan so he went straight to the Dylan section and I of course headed for the Beatles.  There I found an odd LP, completely white except for the words "Kum Back" stamped in blue ink.    It was $5.00 which was really expensive at the time for an LP but I had to have it so I borrowed a buck from my brother.

When I got it home I couldn't believe what I was hearing:  the Beatles rehearsing songs that I had never heard: Dig A Pony, Long and Winding Road, Two of Us and of course Let It Be which instantly became my favorite.  This version has Paul playing the organ solo on his piano.  The recordings on this bootleg was poor,who knows how many generations, and the preformances were rough, but it completely blew me away.  It was really cool to play Beatle songs to my friends that none of them had ever heard.

Anyway fast focus a few months and lo and behold there is the Beatles next single: Let it Be.   I ran out to buy the 45 and see the name of a song that I hadn't heard before so I flipped it over and played it.   The song started out in a slow, almost sluggish fashion and then John and Paul come in with the loud and un-Beatleish: You know my NAMMMEEE!   I was stunned at how awful it was but by the end of the song I was in on the joke and played it over and over, much to the chagrin of my entire family.

Cool song but really weird.  Paul once said this was his favorite recording by the Beatles cause it was so much fun doing it.   This is the kind of stuff they would do in Hamburg just to get a rise out of the audience.

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6 hours ago, krista4 said:

Yeah, I had no idea until I started posting these. I’m such a fan of almost all of it that I’ve never thought much about anything but the broad “early v late” distinction, with respect to which I’m pretty balanced.  As I started to firm up these rankings, though, it became clear that Rubber Soul and Revolver were dominating.  Smack dab in the middle.

ETA:  I think that means I’m dull.

It doesn't make you dull.  Since I'm a middle Beatles fan as well, it makes us love their best work.  😀

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4 minutes ago, Yankee23Fan said:

Love this song. Need to absorb the rest of the list to see if it's too low, but it very well could be in the right spot....and that is scary.

I love Mr Kite as well.  I think it's because it is different than many other songs and incorporates the circus organ so very well into the song.  The Beatles were so incredible it is easy to love most of their work though.  

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20 hours ago, krista4 said:

Look out, it's another cover song!

181.  Mr. Moonlight (Beatles for Sale, 1964)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

We're into a new tier of covers.  In these, I don't think the Beatles versions are worse, but they don't do anything to make the songs better, either.  

This one sounds awfully corny in some ways, in particular Paul's "roller rink" Hammond organ solo in the middle, but I suspect it's meant to be.  All the goofiness - why is George on African drum?  why is Ringo hitting those tom-toms so hard?  why is the harmony so monotone? oh no, here comes that organ solo - makes the energy of John's blistering vocals stand out even more.  John's commitment to this song makes it shine through the zaniness.

Mr. krista:  "Vocals are so great though.  He clearly loves that song more than anybody else in the band."

The original by Dr. Feelgood and the Interns has a similarly stellar vocal.   

That is kind of a stupid song that I do like. I am learning how many Beatles songs I totally erased from my mind though. I am curious what number we get to where it starts getting into non-stop great songs.

Edited by Ilov80s
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41 minutes ago, DocHolliday said:

I love Mr Kite as well.  I think it's because it is different than many other songs and incorporates the circus organ so very well into the song.  The Beatles were so incredible it is easy to love most of their work though.  

Truth.

It also helps that Sgt. Pepper is a top 5 all time album for me.  I love every single piece of it, and while the separate parts have some true outright musical greatness, I find myself believing that the sum of the parts is even better.

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2 minutes ago, Yankee23Fan said:

Truth.

It also helps that Sgt. Pepper is a top 5 all time album for me.  I love every single piece of it, and while the separate parts have some true outright musical greatness, I find myself believing that the sum of the parts is even better.

Yes, my preferences would place every single track of Sgt Pepper's above anything that appeared on their first three albums, even the big hits like Love Me Do or I Wanna Hold Your Hand. Those are brilliant pieces of candy while everything on Pepper (and most of Abbey Road) are musical filet mignon.

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4 minutes ago, pecorino said:

Yes, my preferences would place every single track of Sgt Pepper's above anything that appeared on their first three albums, even the big hits like Love Me Do or I Wanna Hold Your Hand. Those are brilliant pieces of candy while everything on Pepper (and most of Abbey Road) are musical filet mignon.

HIJACK ALERT, BUT MAYBE COOL WITH KRISTA:

I totally disagree with this, but still want to hear your thoughts on David Foster Wallace's triangular structure in Infinite Jest. It's a thread long gone; but I remember it.  

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1 minute ago, pecorino said:

Yes, my preferences would place every single track of Sgt Pepper's above anything that appeared on their first three albums, even the big hits like Love Me Do or I Wanna Hold Your Hand. Those are brilliant pieces of candy while everything on Pepper (and most of Abbey Road) are musical filet mignon.

As much as I love them I would place at least 10-15 songs recorded during the first three LPs over Good Morning, Good Morning, Within Without You and When I'm 64.

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14 minutes ago, Yankee23Fan said:

 

It also helps that Sgt. Pepper is a top 5 all time album for me.  I love every single piece of it, and while the separate parts have some true outright musical greatness, I find myself believing that the sum of the parts is even better.

Apologies for the spotlighting, but I'm impressed with krista's open-mindedness that ""Within You Without You" has not yet appeared. I happen to like the song, but I know many folks - including huge Beatles fans - are turned off by the incessant sitar sound.

Edited by zamboni
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5 minutes ago, zamboni said:

I'm impressed with krista's open-mindedness that ""Within You Without You" has not yet appeared. I happen to like the song, but I know many folks - including huge Beatles fans - are turned off by the incessant sitar sound.

Awesome song but I've always preferred Love You To and The Inner Light over Within You Without You

Edited by Godsbrother
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29 minutes ago, Godsbrother said:

Awesome song but I've always preferred Love You To and The Inner Light over Within You Without You

I’ve always preferred The Inner Light to the  other two myself. I think it’s the best sitar featured song by George 

Edited by BroncoFreak_2K3
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Been away (not by choice) so I haven’t had the chance to respond. Though I happen to like several of these songs, there are only two that I really happen to object to being the bottom 10%: “Roll Over Beethoven” and “Rock and Roll Music”. 

Growing up in the 70s, I was exposed to these two covers from a great compilation album I owned called The Beatles Rock and Roll Music, which included most of their early Chuck Berry, Little Richard, and Isley Brothers songs. To me, this is really exciting rock and roll; these covers are better than the originals, they have an energy that reminds me strongly of early punk rock. I think this is among the Beatles’ best music. 

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39 minutes ago, zamboni said:

Apologies for the spotlighting, but I'm impressed with krista's open-mindedness that ""Within You Without You" has not yet appeared. I happen to like the song, but I know many folks - including huge Beatles fans - are turned off by the incessant sitar sound.

Love the sitar.  But I enjoy it that much more because of where it falls on the album.  This sad melancholy song that almost drones, purposely, ending with laughter and then waking you up with When I'm 64 and it's silliness.  They go from talking about where to find love and truth and the failures of relationships and people, ending with a statement that we can be one when we come to grips with who we are...……….. and then, not for nothing dear, but you're going to still love me when I'm bald and fat and old, right?

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7 minutes ago, timschochet said:

Been away (not by choice) so I haven’t had the chance to respond. Though I happen to like several of these songs, there are only two that I really happen to object to being the bottom 10%: “Roll Over Beethoven” and “Rock and Roll Music”. 

Growing up in the 70s, I was exposed to these two covers from a great compilation album I owned called The Beatles Rock and Roll Music, which included most of their early Chuck Berry, Little Richard, and Isley Brothers songs. To me, this is really exciting rock and roll; these covers are better than the originals, they have an energy that reminds me strongly of early punk rock. I think this is among the Beatles’ best music. 

Yr not wrong, but this is subjective, my friend. I always found early Beatles covers to be punk rock. But their later-to-middle stuff was even more punkish, if you get my drift.   

Edited by rockaction
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9 hours ago, krista4 said:

Let's clear out a few covers before morning.  These are all still in the category of songs that I think are terrific, but to which the Beatles covers don't add much new.  I didn't intend to have these covers bunched up like this, but when I look above them I can't say I prefer any of them to a Beatles original up there.   

But before we get to the covers, I need to post one of those very love-it-or-hate-it songs.  I happen to love it.

175.  You Know My Name (Look Up the Number) (Single, 1970)

Beatles:  Spotify  YouTube

I understand a lot of people hate this song, and in terms of "noise" songs a lot would put Mr. Kite above it, but...this song cracks me up. It always makes me laugh with its madness, and I'm fascinated every time I hear it.  One of the most bizarre facts about this to me is that it was the b-side to "Let It Be."  I can just imagine some sweet human buying that single and then freaking out over WTF was on the other side.

(Quick aside:  I've noticed that @DaVinci always mentions this song as his favorite, which I've always assumed was sarcasm, but I'd love to hear his thoughts on it either way.)

One of the main appeals to me of this song is that they sound like they're having such a damn great time.  And in 1967 (recorded three years before its release, btw), that's notable.  I'm also a fan of the Beatles and post-Beatles songs that sound like different songs mushed together - see, e.g., Band on the Run, You Never Give Me Your Money, etc.  Obviously I'm not saying this is on par with those, but I do love the songs that move from one segment to another, one tempo and feel to another, but somehow work, and the four-or-is-it-five separate parts of this keep me interested along the way.  I dunno; a lot of people think this one is nonsense, which I couldn't argue with, but hey, at one point Paul said that this was his favorite song of theirs, so I can't be completely off, right?  Paul's pretty weird, though.  Regardless, it's my favorite song that features a burp at the end.

Fun facts:  one of the many crazy sound effects on this song is Mal Evans either, depending upon what you believe, running a spade through some gravel or shaking a bag of some gravel.  In any case, gravel was a supporting vocal here.    Also, listen for Brian Jones of the Stones on sax.

Mr. krista:  "This is better if you imagine Muppets doing it."

Suggested cover:  After typing four earnest paragraphs about this, and thereafter checking the notes to find Mr. krista's comments (which are copied in full), I'm laughing too hard to look for a cover.  Maybe later.  (And when I just reminded him of his comment from months ago, I can't get him to stop singing this to me in an Animals-from-the-Muppets voice.)

Normally, I'm not as big of a fan of the Beatles-just-screwing-around types of songs.  But, holy crap I love this song.  The pure, unadulterated giddiness is so infectious for me.  I like to imagine them recording it wearing wigs and maybe some I'm-Gonna-Get-You-Sucka fishtank high heels.  

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I’m working but will catch up shortly.  Guess you guys were right that more discussion would spring from better songs.

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12 minutes ago, krista4 said:

I’m working but will catch up shortly.  Guess you guys were right that more discussion would spring from better songs.

If you want more discussion just put a really good song at #160 or so.  The music geeks will come out in droves.

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27 minutes ago, Shaft41 said:

Normally, I'm not as big of a fan of the Beatles-just-screwing-around types of songs.  But, holy crap I love this song.  The pure, unadulterated giddiness is so infectious for me.  I like to imagine them recording it wearing wigs and maybe some I'm-Gonna-Get-You-Sucka fishtank high heels.  

You Know My Name started out good, but then it kind of lost me when they went to the pseudo-shuffle thing, then it got worse from there. I hadn't heard it prior to Krista listing it in this thread.

Edited by Gr00vus
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I am partial to Sgt Pepper because it was my first real full exposure to the Beatles. The first time I took an album and listened to it all the way over and over. However, if I am going back now to listen to the Beatles it is one of the last albums I would go for. It's a little too much schtick for me. 

Edited by Ilov80s
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1 hour ago, Getzlaf15 said:

Has the cat moved yet?

There's like six so I think they just rotate.

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9 hours ago, Getzlaf15 said:

Are we there yet?

Almost.

3 hours ago, Ilov80s said:

That is kind of a stupid song that I do like. I am learning how Beatles songs I totally erased from my mind though. I am curious what number we get to where it starts getting into non-stop great songs.

To me we're almost there.

2 hours ago, pecorino said:

Yes, my preferences would place every single track of Sgt Pepper's above anything that appeared on their first three albums, even the big hits like Love Me Do or I Wanna Hold Your Hand. Those are brilliant pieces of candy while everything on Pepper (and most of Abbey Road) are musical filet mignon.

Completely understandable, and a lot of people would feel the same (or nearly the same) way.  For me, there are some songs that I admire more than love on SPLHCB and Abbey Road (well, there are also a few I neither admire nor love).  It's related to what I said in my first post, which is that this isn't a ranking based on which songs I think are "best" but which ones I enjoy/love the most, similar to Gr00vus loving songs by "feel."  I realize that might be a modest distinction for many, and for you, that might not be a distinction at all.  Anyway, looking forward to your thoughts as we move through, even when you're disappointed in a ranking!

2 hours ago, rockaction said:

HIJACK ALERT, BUT MAYBE COOL WITH KRISTA:

I totally disagree with this, but still want to hear your thoughts on David Foster Wallace's triangular structure in Infinite Jest. It's a thread long gone; but I remember it.  

Always happy for DFW talk.  Does this mean the thread got lost somewhere?

2 hours ago, Godsbrother said:

Awesome song but I've always preferred Love You To and The Inner Light over Within You Without You

I've grown to prefer Love You To the best of the three, but I'm a fan of all of them.

1 hour ago, timschochet said:

Been away (not by choice) so I haven’t had the chance to respond. Though I happen to like several of these songs, there are only two that I really happen to object to being the bottom 10%: “Roll Over Beethoven” and “Rock and Roll Music”. 

Growing up in the 70s, I was exposed to these two covers from a great compilation album I owned called The Beatles Rock and Roll Music, which included most of their early Chuck Berry, Little Richard, and Isley Brothers songs. To me, this is really exciting rock and roll; these covers are better than the originals, they have an energy that reminds me strongly of early punk rock. I think this is among the Beatles’ best music. 

Rock and Roll Music wasn't in the bottom 10%. ;)  By the way, I hear a pretty big distinction between the energy of the two songs, but that's just to my ears.  Rock and Roll Music would be ranked higher if I weren't looking at covers a little differently than originals.  I'm blown away that you prefer the Beatles version of Roll Over Beethoven to Berry's.

1 hour ago, Shaft41 said:

Normally, I'm not as big of a fan of the Beatles-just-screwing-around types of songs.  But, holy crap I love this song.  The pure, unadulterated giddiness is so infectious for me.  I like to imagine them recording it wearing wigs and maybe some I'm-Gonna-Get-You-Sucka fishtank high heels.  

:lmao: 

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15 hours ago, krista4 said:

Back to the countdown!  We're going to pop our Sgt. Pepper's Cherry!

176.  Being For The Benefit Of Mr Kite!  (Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, 1967)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

It's getting really tough at this point, because I like all of these songs, and there's nothing left in the countdown that I'd turn off when it comes on (with one possible exception I'll mention when we get to it).  This is a John song with some of the hallmarks of a Paul song - the "circus" quality reminds me of Paul's dance-hall songs, and the invention of a new world is usually a Paul practice.  But was it an invention?  John admits that he cribbed most of the details from an 1800s circus poster he bought at an antique shop - from the Hendersons to Henry the Horse to the hogshead of real fire.  Interesting article and image of the poster here! 

John didn't particularly like the song and said he was "just going through the motions because we needed a new song."  I have a more favorable impression of the song than John does, as I love the creation of the circus atmosphere that makes me feel like I'm there (even though I hate circuses) - credit to George Martin for all of that.  I could listen to the part between 0:59-1:29 over and over - and I do - though I feel the ending soundscape starts to drag a little.  Don't sleep on the Paul's bass or Ringo's drums on this one.  We'll have to discuss Ringo on all of this album, as I think it's one of the many places where he really shines.

Mr. krista:  "Pretty good song about a circus.  Good circus song.  There’s probably a song somewhere about the Flying Wallendas that’s better."

Suggested covers:  I've studiously avoided this movie, but I like Eddie Izzard's version.  If only this were better quality - The Residents with the London Sinfonietta

 

 

Apparently, me luvely dont care for found art as much as i. The Scrambled Eggness of Beatle genius is second only to the high art & great craft of the masterworks. Recording history is chock full of stories of bass players not showing up so the guitarist takes it over or seeing posters on walls as a writing exercise or throwing together a song about twiddling thumbs as a way to keep from twiddling thumbs when youre waiting for something/one. I've been in studios when someone accidently came up w sumn weird or stoopit, another person ran with it then another and it builds into what i call a cheeseproof music moment which tunes accident into harmonic convergence. There is nothing with more life in it than those moments and Fab history is chockablock with incidents of that kind and i love them all. 

The countdown is in a zone where no rating is empirically wrong and it's only taste & experience (and the odd case of importance) by which anyone's ranking differs, so i am just thrilled to hear your views, digest the work you & Ollie have put to it and the reactions of the other busbozos on this Musical Mastery Tour. Carry on -

still can;t find my hat...

Edited by wikkidpissah
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12 minutes ago, krista4 said:

 

Rock and Roll Music wasn't in the bottom 10%. ;)  By the way, I hear a pretty big distinction between the energy of the two songs, but that's just to my ears.  Rock and Roll Music would be ranked higher if I weren't looking at covers a little differently than originals.  I'm blown away that you prefer the Beatles version of Roll Over Beethoven to Berry's.

:lmao: 

Yeah, that ####ed me up too. I need a shot of Sambuca 

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3 minutes ago, Uruk-Hai said:

Yeah, that ####ed me up too. I need a shot of Sambuca 

Can't join you and actually better get out of the thread for the rest of the day if you do. Every time i've drank Sambuca i've gotten into a fight.

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5 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

Can't join you and actually better get out of the thread for the rest of the day if you do. Every time i've drank Sambuca i've gotten into a fight.

Sambuca and Xtanbentun (when I'm in Mexico) both are low-level buzzes for me for whatever reason. Tequila & whiskey have gotten me a few black eyes, though.

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Back to it.  Two songs that couldn't be more different from each other.

171.  All Together Now (Yellow Submarine, 1969)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

This song, along with a few others that will come up soon-ish, is a children's song but still a blast for me.  It's also been a popular "terrace chant" at English football games - I think it was the Ron Howard documentary that had video of this (though I might be mixing that up with a different doc).  I went to see the remastered Yellow Submarine in the theater last year, and the rollicking great time people were having singing along with this one at the end might have positively affected my rating of the song.  Sure, it's a trifle, but it's just ####### fun.  Sometimes that oughta be enough.

Mr. krista:  "It’s a fun song.  It’s appropriate for a children’s movie.  [Discussion whether YS is a children's movie.]  It’s very gentle, and both a children’s song and a drinking song."

Suggested covers:  I would not argue it is "good," but the André 3000 version cracks me up.  Of course The Muppets version is recommended.

 

170.  Don't Bother Me (With the Beatles, 1963)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Apparently I enjoy the first George-penned song on a Beatles album much more than (1) George did or (2) the rest of the Beatles did, as I've read that none of them were pleased with it looking back.  :shrug: But I like the spookiness, the darker mood than most anything else they were doing at the time.  Check out some of these lyrics in comparison to the rest of what was on these early records:

Since she's been gone 
I want no one 
To talk to me 
It's not the same 
But I'm to blame 
It's plain to see 

So go away and leave me alone 
Don't bother me 

I can't believe 
That she would leave 
Me on my own 
It's just not right 
Where every night 
I'm all alone 

I've got no time for you right now 
Don't bother me

Ringo's percussion and Paul's excellent bass combine to set either a Latin or Western tone (I vacillate on which one I'm hearing) that i find pleasing.  I love the breaks just at the end of the verses, too.

Mr. krista:  "I like the Western kind of galloping.  I like this song a lot.  Might be the first time I’ve heard it.  I’m really into this.  Would make a great soundtrack song, like something where you’d say 'What the #### is that?'  'That’s the Beatles, dummy.'"

Suggested cover:  I've listened to more terrible covers of this song than any other so far.  All I can offer, again, is The Smithereens, though their version might be slightly too on the nose.

Edited by krista4
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1 hour ago, wikkidpissah said:

Apparently, me luvely dont care for found art as much as i. The Scrambled Eggness of Beatle genius is second only to the high art & great craft of the masterworks. Recording history is chock full of stories of bass players not showing up so the guitarist takes it over or seeing posters on walls as a writing exercise or throwing together a song about twiddling thumbs as a way to keep from twiddling thumbs when youre waiting for something/one. I've been in studios when someone accidently came up w sumn weird or stoopit, another person ran with it then another and it builds into what i call a cheeseproof music moment which tunes accident into harmonic convergence. There is nothing with more life in it than those moments and Fab history is chockablock with incidents of that kind and i love them all. 

The countdown is in a zone where no rating is empirically wrong and it's only taste & experience (and the odd case of importance) by which anyone's ranking differs, so i am just thrilled to hear your views, digest the work you & Ollie have put to it and the reactions of the other busbozos on this Musical Mastery Tour. Carry on -

still can;t find my hat...

I love found art.  It was John himself who expressed such disappointment over some of his songs including that one.  I've always hated that he put his works down so much; one that he expressed some antipathy (hi, rock!) for is in my top 10.

"the reactions of the other busbozos on this Musical Mastery Tour" is one of your best turns of phrases yet.  :heart: 

1 hour ago, Uruk-Hai said:

Yeah, that ####ed me up too. I need a shot of Sambuca 

To an earlier point re me/cats, is there a time you don't? ;)

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5 minutes ago, krista4 said:

 

To an earlier point re me/cats, is there a time you don't? ;)

😔 No, dammit

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Just did an album health check and see that A Hard Day's Night, Rubber Soul, and Revolver are the only ones that haven't had cuts yet.  

I'm going to take a little time to think through this order again; I realized that my constantly shifting things around let a couple of songs slip through the cracks - "Misery" stands out to me as one I wish I'd ranked lower.  Other than that, though, starting at song #178 we've reached songs I like a ton, so as far as I'm concerned, we're already in the very good stuff.

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6 minutes ago, krista4 said:

 

I'm going to take a little time to think through this order again;

NO! It'll never end, krista. Roll with what you have. Trust me, I kept getting married for the same reason.

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28 minutes ago, krista4 said:

Back to it.  Two songs that couldn't be more different from each other.

170.  All Together Now (Yellow Submarine, 1969)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

This song, along with a few others that will come up soon-ish, is a children's song but still a blast for me.  It's also been a popular "terrace chant" at English football games - I think it was the Ron Howard documentary that had video of this (though I might be mixing that up with a different doc).  I went to see the remastered Yellow Submarine in the theater last year, and the rollicking great time people were having singing along with this one at the end might have positively affected my rating of the song.  Sure, it's a bit of a throwaway, but it's just ####### fun.  Sometimes that oughta be enough.

Mr. krista:  "It’s a fun song.  It’s appropriate for a children’s movie.  [Discussion whether YS is a children's movie.]  It’s very gentle, and both a children’s song and a drinking song."

Suggested covers:  I would not argue it is "good," but the André 3000 version cracks me up.  Of course The Muppets version is recommended.

My first movie, age 6. It was my first time ever going into town to the cinema.

We ate spaghetti before we went, which I seem to have a clearer memory of than the actual movie.

Quote

At the end, we see the real Beatles in live-action, having returned home, playfully showing off their souvenirs: George has the submarine's motor, Paul has (literally) "a little 'LOVE'" and Ringo still has half a hole in his pocket (having supposedly given the other half to Jeremy, which Paul offers to fix "to keep his mind from wandering", a reference to "Fixing a Hole"). Ringo points out John looking through a telescope, which prompts Paul to ask (recalling cartoon Paul's first line in the film), "What's the matter, John-Love? Blue Meanies?" John answers that "newer and bluer Meanies have been sighted within the vicinity of this theatre" and claims there is only one way to go out: "Singing!" The four obliges with a short reprise of "All Together Now", which ends with translations of the song's title in various languages appearing in sequence on the screen. The film originally concluded with the words "Released through United Artists" on the bottom-right-hand-corner of the screen.

 

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10 minutes ago, Uruk-Hai said:

NO! It'll never end, krista. Roll with what you have. Trust me, I kept getting married for the same reason.

:lmao: :lmao: :lmao: 

Sage advice, too.  

Crowd favorite "Baby's in Black" suffered about 20 spots in the last re-ordering.

10 minutes ago, BobbyLayne said:

My first movie, age 6. It was my first time ever going into town to the cinema.

We ate spaghetti before we went, which I seem to have a clearer memory of than the actual movie.

 

I think seeing the movie as an adult made me appreciate it a lot more.  As a kid, you aren't going to catch all the references and in-jokes and the like.  It's a hilarious movie.

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