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Bradshaw takes on the Mannings (1 Viewer)

Frenchy Fuqua

Footballguy
I was wondering when someone would tell Archie to let his kids stand on their own.

January 19, 2006

Link

Bradshaw stands by his remarks

Former QB unapologetic about criticizing Manning after latter's postgame comments

Fox football commentator Terry Bradshaw made no apologies for "doing my job" Sunday, when he criticized quarterback Peyton Manning for saying in a postgame news conference that the Indianapolis Colts had pass-protection problems in a 21-18 playoff loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Archie Manning told Newsday newspaper on Tuesday that Bradshaw's comments were "a cheap shot" at his son and that Bradshaw "seems to like to take shots at Peyton."

On a Fox conference call Wednesday, Bradshaw fired back.

"You've got to stand up and do your own battles," Bradshaw said. "My daddy taught me that a long time ago, that you fight your own battles. The only way to shut everybody up is to win."

Bradshaw said he did what he is supposed to: give an off-the-cuff critique.

"I don't have all day to analyze a tape," he said. "And Archie can pile on a whole lot more people than me today, because I wasn't the only one who said (Peyton was calling out his offensive line).

"We talk about how smart he is, how he's in charge out there, and it's amazing how one negative takes away from all the good things we say about him.

"He had to face all the questions about starting 13-0, about losing to a No. 6 seed, so I totally, totally understand his frustration. I just think he had a poor choice of words."

 

Joe Bryant

Guide
Staff member
This will make great Jerry Springer stuff. I understand both sides. Bradshaw says what he thinks and he's paid to express his opinion. I agree with him that Peyton Manning shouldn't have said what he said for the reasons we're seeing here.As a father, I can also relate 100% to Archie Manning as it would be tough to hear people rip your son with glee. That's part of why they make the huge dollars in that you have to accept that's how it is and put up with it.J

 
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avoiding injuries

Footballguy
I don't hear any other parents complaining about the media's comments toward their children. I think Archie needs to let his boys fight for themselves.

 

Boston

Footballguy
I don't hear any other parents complaining about the media's comments toward their children. I think Archie needs to let his boys fight for themselves.
I believe Phil Simms did something similar with Steve Young this year.
 

Joe Bryant

Guide
Staff member
I don't hear any other parents complaining about the media's comments toward their children. I think Archie needs to let his boys fight for themselves.
That's always the best way to handle it.Whenever family gets involved (Kurt Warners wife for instance) it's almost always bad.

I'd be interested to know how it came about with Archie. Wouldn't surprise me if they called him and tried to get him on. Jerry Springer sells big time and they know this.

J

 

avoiding injuries

Footballguy
I don't hear any other parents complaining about the media's comments toward their children. I think Archie needs to let his boys fight for themselves.
That's always the best way to handle it.Whenever family gets involved (Kurt Warners wife for instance) it's almost always bad.

I'd be interested to know how it came about with Archie. Wouldn't surprise me if they called him and tried to get him on. Jerry Springer sells big time and they know this.

J
Hi JB,You make a good point. Archie probably was contacted about the comments and this was his response. I imagine other player's parents aren't contacted due to lack of notoriety.

AI

 

Joe Bryant

Guide
Staff member
I don't hear any other parents complaining about the media's comments toward their children.  I think Archie needs to let his boys fight for themselves.
That's always the best way to handle it.Whenever family gets involved (Kurt Warners wife for instance) it's almost always bad.

I'd be interested to know how it came about with Archie. Wouldn't surprise me if they called him and tried to get him on. Jerry Springer sells big time and they know this.

J
Hi JB,You make a good point. Archie probably was contacted about the comments and this was his response. I imagine other player's parents aren't contacted due to lack of notoriety.

AI
FWIW AI,He always took a VERY low key approach here when Manning was at UT. He seemed almost hyper conscious of staying out of the way and would not ever get into discussions about anything remotely sensitive for fear of undermining what the coaching staff was doing.

I sat a row down from Mr. and Mrs. Manning and Eli (when he was just a kid) at the Alabama game in Birmingham when a buddy hooked me up with tickets in the players family section. Sat right next to Cosey Coleman's mom who could take Cosey in a wrestling match I think. She was super nice. The Mannings were super low profile in the stands just sitting there like everyone else. For what that's worth. (I realize not much)

J

 

DoctorDetroit

Chocolate Thunder
I've had the opportunity to interview Bradshaw a few times and he is straight and to the point. He is a lot smarter than many people think and he won't back down from anyone. He also still competes because I asked him a lot of questions about former QBs and if he didn't like them (Fouts in particular), he said so.

 
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Joe Bryant

Guide
Staff member
I'm still imagining if George H. Bush spoke up every time his son was criticized.
Yes, I'm sure he feels like it but he knows it'll be a heyday for some people like this so he doesn't.J

 

JAA

Footballguy
Archie involved in his kids lives?!?  Say it aint so ...
Shocking a father would still be involved with his adult sons.... ;) J
I could infer a lot of things from your response here, one of which is sarcasm. Please elaborate ...
 

pricklypete

Footballguy
I'm really starting to dislike the Mannings as a whole.Sure it would hard hearing the criticism as a father, but Archie should know better than others that this is the nature of the NFL.Even if it was a direct question, he still sounds like a whine bag.

 

BlueOnion

Footballguy
Does anybody recall the history between Archie Manning and Terry Bradshaw? I believe this goes way back. I believe Terry Bradshaw was from New Orleans, however the Saints by-passed the hometown hero (Bradshaw) and selected Archie with the #1 pick. I also cannot recall, but I am pretty sure Manning played at LSU and Bradshaw also played somewhere in the SEC. A lot of speculation here, so if somebody in the 'know' could shed some light, I would appreciate it.

 

Frenchy Fuqua

Footballguy
Bradshaw is from Louisiana Tech and was the first overall pick by the Steelers in 1970. Manning is from Ole Miss and was the 2nd pick overall by the Saints in 1971.

 

MarshallRob

Footballguy
Does anybody recall the history between Archie Manning and Terry Bradshaw?  I believe this goes way back.  I believe Terry Bradshaw was from New Orleans, however the Saints by-passed the hometown hero (Bradshaw) and selected Archie with the #1 pick. 

I also cannot recall, but I am pretty sure Manning played at LSU and Bradshaw also played somewhere in the SEC. 

A lot of speculation here, so if somebody in the 'know' could shed some light, I would appreciate it.
Bradshaw went to high school in Shreveport, LA, and played college ball at Lousiana Tech. Bradshaw was drafted #1 overall by the Steelers in 1970. Manning was the second pick in the 1971 draft, (the Patriots took Jim Plunkett #1 overall).Edit: Beaten to the punch by Frenchy Fuqua!

 
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Da Guru

Fair & Balanced
The problem with Peyton is his body language. When he is in tight games with NE the last couple of years and with Pitt this year it almost looks like he is ready to cry, his face is pouty, flailing his arms. That is not good out of your QB or leader and I think the team feeds off the negativity. Sensing doom. Then blaming your line was the last straw.

 

Wadsworth

Footballguy
A lot of NFL players have had famous dads. Some former NFL players and some like Ken Norton, famous for other sports. I recall Kellen Sr defending K2 a bit early on, but it's been pretty rare or the press just hasn't covered it.But like it or not, Peyton is a high profile, highly paid, NFL star. Everything he does or related to him is magnified. That why he gets a $39m signing bonus, that's why he has national commercials, and that's why when his play is less than expected he gets held accountable to a higher level. And that's why Archie's comments are news. Not because Archie was so good(which I think he was), but because peyton is. But what does Bradshaw know about playing QB in the play offs anyways? Someone should ask the expert, Bill Polian to clear this up. Afterall, these other people just don't know football. :boxing:

 

Bob Henry

Footballguy
Bradshaw's quote sums it all up rather well for me."My daddy taught me that a long time ago, that you fight your own battles. The only way to shut everybody up is to win."To each his own. Until Peyton wins the Super Bowl, I'm afraid he better get used to it. Peyton is making HUGE jack and potentially at the cost of the team. When you put yourself in that type of a leadership position, then you better prepare yourself for the naysayers if you're not successful.Without getting into semantics about "successful".. It's clear that if Peyton doesn't win the SB, then he'll continue to hear about it from the media, fans, haters, etc.So, again.. Winning takes care of everything, just like Terry said. btw, I can't think of a better person (besides Terry) to speak on this subject considering the amount of flack he took in his first years as the Steelers QB. He was bashed. He won. Now he's a HOFer. I'm sure Peyton would love to follow his path, but until he does, he'll be open to criticism.It goes with the territory.

 
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Bad_Mo

Footballguy
This will make great Jerry Springer stuff. I understand both sides. Bradshaw says what he thinks and he's paid to express his opinion. I agree with him that Peyton Manning shouldn't have said what he said for the reasons we're seeing here.

As a father, I can also relate 100% to Archie Manning as it would be tough to hear people rip your son with glee. That's part of why they make the huge dollars in that you have to accept that's how it is and put up with it.

J
Based on the 2005 playoff performances of Eli and Peyton, you can't blame people for ripping them. Archie should shut up and hang out at the senior center more often. Him jumping to their defense every time makes them look like little boys.Like Archie doesn't know that Eli and Peyton have to step up to the plate and deal with adversity if they don't win. Welcome to the NFL.

 

Memphis Foundry

The King of Wishful Thinking
Staff member
Bradshaw's quote sums it all up rather well for me.

"My daddy taught me that a long time ago, that you fight your own battles. The only way to shut everybody up is to win."

To each his own.

Until Peyton wins the Super Bowl, I'm afraid he better get used to it.

Peyton is making HUGE jack and potentially at the cost of the team. When you put yourself in that type of a leadership position, then you better prepare yourself for the naysayers if you're not successful.

Without getting into semantics about "successful".. It's clear that if Peyton doesn't win the SB, then he'll continue to hear about it from the media, fans, haters, etc.

So, again.. Winning takes care of everything, just like Terry said.

btw, I can't think of a better person (besides Terry) to speak on this subject considering the amount of flack he took in his first years as the Steelers QB. He was bashed. He won. Now he's a HOFer. I'm sure Peyton would love to follow his path, but until he does, he'll be open to criticism.

It goes with the territory.
Bob is right on the mark here. I also thought Bradshaw was dead-on in his remarks. I would hardly call them a "cheap shot" -- they really struck me as an offer of heartfelt advice. Anyone who knows Bradshaw's career knows that he was a guy who had his share of struggles and then some as a young QB. Massive expectations were placed on him from the outset as the #1 overall pick and his early years were rough. He was ineffective, booed by the Pittsburgh crowd, and regularly benched for Terry Hanratty and Joe Gilliam. Once he learned how to cope -- to get mad and turn his frustration into positive motivation -- only then did he became the quarterback everyone knows from the NFL Films clips.I thought it was a word to the wise, myself. I like Peyton Manning as a player and as a positive role model. But when you go out in front of the cameras and slag your teammates in public, it damages the moral authority you have with your teammates to get worked up about it in private -- which is really where your insights have the best chance of effecting positive change. And that's exactly what Bradshaw was saying. In my mind, Archie Manning comes away looking pretty hypersensitive here.

 

Jason Wood

Zoo York
Bradshaw's quote sums it all up rather well for me.

"My daddy taught me that a long time ago, that you fight your own battles. The only way to shut everybody up is to win."

To each his own.

Until Peyton wins the Super Bowl, I'm afraid he better get used to it.

Peyton is making HUGE jack and potentially at the cost of the team. When you put yourself in that type of a leadership position, then you better prepare yourself for the naysayers if you're not successful.

Without getting into semantics about "successful".. It's clear that if Peyton doesn't win the SB, then he'll continue to hear about it from the media, fans, haters, etc.

So, again.. Winning takes care of everything, just like Terry said.

btw, I can't think of a better person (besides Terry) to speak on this subject considering the amount of flack he took in his first years as the Steelers QB. He was bashed. He won. Now he's a HOFer. I'm sure Peyton would love to follow his path, but until he does, he'll be open to criticism.

It goes with the territory.
:goodposting: Whether it's fair or not, deserved or not, Manning is going to have that label until he wins a Super Bowl. If you were to ask me to bet, I would say he absolutely WILL win at least one SB and when he does, all this talk will vanish away.

As I mentioned in another thread recently, Elway and Marino are classic examples of this. Once Elway won back-to-back Super Bowls, the criticism fell way, way, WAY down and only the most ardent Elway haters moved on to the "well he never won a SB without Terrell Davis." Marino, on the other hand, never won the SB and thus is burdened by that stigma for eternity.

 
Bradshaw's quote sums it all up rather well for me.

"My daddy taught me that a long time ago, that you fight your own battles. The only way to shut everybody up is to win."

To each his own.

Until Peyton wins the Super Bowl, I'm afraid he better get used to it.

Peyton is making HUGE jack and potentially at the cost of the team. When you put yourself in that type of a leadership position, then you better prepare yourself for the naysayers if you're not successful.

Without getting into semantics about "successful".. It's clear that if Peyton doesn't win the SB, then he'll continue to hear about it from the media, fans, haters, etc.

So, again.. Winning takes care of everything, just like Terry said.

btw, I can't think of a better person (besides Terry) to speak on this subject considering the amount of flack he took in his first years as the Steelers QB. He was bashed. He won. Now he's a HOFer. I'm sure Peyton would love to follow his path, but until he does, he'll be open to criticism.

It goes with the territory.
:goodposting: Whether it's fair or not, deserved or not, Manning is going to have that label until he wins a Super Bowl. If you were to ask me to bet, I would say he absolutely WILL win at least one SB and when he does, all this talk will vanish away.

As I mentioned in another thread recently, Elway and Marino are classic examples of this. Once Elway won back-to-back Super Bowls, the criticism fell way, way, WAY down and only the most ardent Elway haters moved on to the "well he never won a SB without Terrell Davis." Marino, on the other hand, never won the SB and thus is burdened by that stigma for eternity.
You think Jim Kelley is burdened by losing 4 SBs? Somehow I doubt it. What about Fran Tarkenton? I don't think people look back at him as a loser / choke artist.
 
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redman

Footballguy
This will make great Jerry Springer stuff. I understand both sides. Bradshaw says what he thinks and he's paid to express his opinion. I agree with him that Peyton Manning shouldn't have said what he said for the reasons we're seeing here.

As a father, I can also relate 100% to Archie Manning as it would be tough to hear people rip your son with glee. That's part of why they make the huge dollars in that you have to accept that's how it is and put up with it.

J
You have to admit, Joe, that it looks silly for a 30-year old "future HoF QB" to have his daddy come out and defend him in the media. If I'm Peyton, I'm telling my pops that I don't want him doing that.
 

kupcho1

Footballguy
I don't hear any other parents complaining about the media's comments toward their children.  I think Archie needs to let his boys fight for themselves.
I believe Phil Simms did something similar with Steve Young this year.
Don't forget Papa Soldier (i.e., Kellen Winslow)
 

nightshift

Footballguy
This will make great Jerry Springer stuff. I understand both sides. Bradshaw says what he thinks and he's paid to express his opinion. I agree with him that Peyton Manning shouldn't have said what he said for the reasons we're seeing here.

As a father, I can also relate 100% to Archie Manning as it would be tough to hear people rip your son with glee. That's part of why they make the huge dollars in that you have to accept that's how it is and put up with it.

J
All part of the sports business. Manning (doesn't matter which one) knows that when he/they signed the contract to play. You are public property now - you say something out of whack, it's recorded and played back a bazillion times, the talking heads rip you a new one for saying it.

The good part is that you have millions of dollars to getaway and lament or just forget about it.

 
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loqutis

Footballguy
The problem with Peyton is his body language.

When he is in tight games with NE the last couple of years and with Pitt this year it almost looks like he is ready to cry, his face is pouty, flailing his arms. That is not good out of your QB or leader and I think the team feeds off the negativity. Sensing doom.

Then blaming your line was the last straw.
I couldn't believe the announcers never made one comment about Mannings mechanics in the pocket. Watch the game again. He hardly ever set his feet before he threw the ball. It was very odd to see such a polished QB basically jumping up and down in the back field looking for someone to throw the ball.
 

Joe Bryant

Guide
Staff member
As a father, I can also relate 100% to Archie Manning as it would be tough to hear people rip your son with glee.
But was Bradshaw really speaking with glee?
Hi Tommy,I don't about Bradshaw. I didn't hear him. I mean more in general. Do you agree there are lots of people who love to see a Manning fail?

J

 
The problem with Peyton is his body language. 

  When he is in tight games with NE the last couple of years and with Pitt this year it almost looks like he is ready to cry, his face is pouty, flailing his arms. That is not good out of your QB or leader and I think the team feeds off the negativity. Sensing doom.

Then blaming your line was the last straw.
I couldn't believe the announcers never made one comment about Mannings mechanics in the pocket. Watch the game again. He hardly ever set his feet before he threw the ball. It was very odd to see such a polished QB basically jumping up and down in the back field looking for someone to throw the ball.
He's always been that way. It goes back to College. He has happy feet and that's the way he plays.
 

ICON211

Footballguy
As a father, I can also relate 100% to Archie Manning as it would be tough to hear people rip your son with glee.
But was Bradshaw really speaking with glee?
Hi Tommy,I don't about Bradshaw. I didn't hear him. I mean more in general. Do you agree there are lots of people who love to see a Manning fail?

J
Might have something to do with the way they carry themselves or that they think they are above the game and the league or that they have been handed the world. What other player other than Eli gets to choose which team he plays for coming out of college?
 
Might have something to do with the way they carry themselves or that they think they are above the game and the league or that they have been handed the world. What other player other than Eli gets to choose which team he plays for coming out of college?
Peyton Manning carries himself very well, and I don't think he thinks of himself as being owed anything. That is more inside your head than his, I'm sure of it.
 

Jason Wood

Zoo York
Bradshaw's quote sums it all up rather well for me.

"My daddy taught me that a long time ago, that you fight your own battles. The only way to shut everybody up is to win."

To each his own.

Until Peyton wins the Super Bowl, I'm afraid he better get used to it.

Peyton is making HUGE jack and potentially at the cost of the team. When you put yourself in that type of a leadership position, then you better prepare yourself for the naysayers if you're not successful.

Without getting into semantics about "successful".. It's clear that if Peyton doesn't win the SB, then he'll continue to hear about it from the media, fans, haters, etc.

So, again.. Winning takes care of everything, just like Terry said.

btw, I can't think of a better person (besides Terry) to speak on this subject considering the amount of flack he took in his first years as the Steelers QB. He was bashed. He won. Now he's a HOFer. I'm sure Peyton would love to follow his path, but until he does, he'll be open to criticism.

It goes with the territory.
:goodposting: Whether it's fair or not, deserved or not, Manning is going to have that label until he wins a Super Bowl. If you were to ask me to bet, I would say he absolutely WILL win at least one SB and when he does, all this talk will vanish away.

As I mentioned in another thread recently, Elway and Marino are classic examples of this. Once Elway won back-to-back Super Bowls, the criticism fell way, way, WAY down and only the most ardent Elway haters moved on to the "well he never won a SB without Terrell Davis." Marino, on the other hand, never won the SB and thus is burdened by that stigma for eternity.
You think Jim Kelley is burdened by losing 4 SBs? Somehow I doubt it. What about Fran Tarkenton? I don't think people look back at him as a loser / choke artist.
I can't speak about Jim Kelly but I do know that Marino has said many times that he deeply regrets never winning a Super Bowl. And other athletes in pro sports have been quite vocal about what they would be willing to give up for one taste of the title.To be fair, Jim Kelly was never really viewed as a choker, Thurman Thomas took on that moniker with the Bills.

And finally, my point wasn't so much about how Manning feels about himself, but how he's PERCEIVED by the world at large.

 

ICON211

Footballguy
Might have something to do with the way they carry themselves or that they think they are above the game and the league or that they have been handed the world.  What other player other than Eli gets to choose which team he plays for coming out of college?
Peyton Manning carries himself very well, and I don't think he thinks of himself as being owed anything. That is more inside your head than his, I'm sure of it.
I guess it was just in my head where he blamed the loss on his O line.
 

TommyGilmore

Footballguy
As a father, I can also relate 100% to Archie Manning as it would be tough to hear people rip your son with glee.
But was Bradshaw really speaking with glee?
Hi Tommy,I don't about Bradshaw. I didn't hear him. I mean more in general. Do you agree there are lots of people who love to see a Manning fail?

J
Oh yes, absolutely. Maybe it's easy to assume that criticism comes "out of glee" when it happens so often?It's so easy to pile on the Mannings right now........it's difficult to tell who is simply offering "constructive criticism", and who is simply taking a cheap shot.

 

Wadsworth

Footballguy
Might have something to do with the way they carry themselves or that they think they are above the game and the league or that they have been handed the world.  What other player other than Eli gets to choose which team he plays for coming out of college?
Peyton Manning carries himself very well, and I don't think he thinks of himself as being owed anything. That is more inside your head than his, I'm sure of it.
I am not a fan of manning and would in a way enjoy it if there was more real proof of him having an ego and being the spoiled brat some think he is. But there really isn't much to hang your hat on that's more than personal opinion. His biggest mistake in that regard to date is likely the recent comments about the O-line. And that was just a mistake said after a tough loss and there's not enough evidence to call it a trend. PS- If I've missed any real evidence of him being an ego-maniac brat, please let me know, I'd love to hear it. :P

 
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Might have something to do with the way they carry themselves or that they think they are above the game and the league or that they have been handed the world.  What other player other than Eli gets to choose which team he plays for coming out of college?
Peyton Manning carries himself very well, and I don't think he thinks of himself as being owed anything. That is more inside your head than his, I'm sure of it.
I guess it was just in my head where he blamed the loss on his O line.
Truth hurts.
 

ICON211

Footballguy
Might have something to do with the way they carry themselves or that they think they are above the game and the league or that they have been handed the world.  What other player other than Eli gets to choose which team he plays for coming out of college?
Peyton Manning carries himself very well, and I don't think he thinks of himself as being owed anything. That is more inside your head than his, I'm sure of it.
I guess it was just in my head where he blamed the loss on his O line.
Truth hurts.
Sure does. 3-6 with awful, AWFUL performances.
 

MarshallRob

Footballguy
Bradshaw's quote sums it all up rather well for me.

"My daddy taught me that a long time ago, that you fight your own battles. The only way to shut everybody up is to win."

To each his own.

Until Peyton wins the Super Bowl, I'm afraid he better get used to it.

Peyton is making HUGE jack and potentially at the cost of the team. When you put yourself in that type of a leadership position, then you better prepare yourself for the naysayers if you're not successful.

Without getting into semantics about "successful".. It's clear that if Peyton doesn't win the SB, then he'll continue to hear about it from the media, fans, haters, etc.

So, again.. Winning takes care of everything, just like Terry said.

btw, I can't think of a better person (besides Terry) to speak on this subject considering the amount of flack he took in his first years as the Steelers QB. He was bashed. He won. Now he's a HOFer. I'm sure Peyton would love to follow his path, but until he does, he'll be open to criticism.

It goes with the territory.
:goodposting: Whether it's fair or not, deserved or not, Manning is going to have that label until he wins a Super Bowl. If you were to ask me to bet, I would say he absolutely WILL win at least one SB and when he does, all this talk will vanish away.

As I mentioned in another thread recently, Elway and Marino are classic examples of this. Once Elway won back-to-back Super Bowls, the criticism fell way, way, WAY down and only the most ardent Elway haters moved on to the "well he never won a SB without Terrell Davis." Marino, on the other hand, never won the SB and thus is burdened by that stigma for eternity.
You think Jim Kelley is burdened by losing 4 SBs? Somehow I doubt it. What about Fran Tarkenton? I don't think people look back at him as a loser / choke artist.
I can't speak about Jim Kelly but I do know that Marino has said many times that he deeply regrets never winning a Super Bowl. And other athletes in pro sports have been quite vocal about what they would be willing to give up for one taste of the title.To be fair, Jim Kelly was never really viewed as a choker, Thurman Thomas took on that moniker with the Bills.

And finally, my point wasn't so much about how Manning feels about himself, but how he's PERCEIVED by the world at large.
I saw Ron Jaworski talking about Super Bowl XV last weekend. He said that to this day he has never watched the tape of that game and he still thinks about it 25 years later. He never had another chance to win a Super Bowl and it still haunts him. I'm pretty sure that's how it goes for any QB whether its Jaws, Marino, Kelly, or Tarkenton. Especially Marino who was about as competitive a player as I've ever seen. Marino's got the biggest burden of all the title-less QB's probably because he may have been the most famous player in the game while setting all the records. It's almost like a mythological tale. The reputations of older QB's considered the best pure passers of their times like Tittle and Jurgensen have also been hurt by the "never won the big game label". Manning's as big a star now as Marino was in the 80's and after last week's game the "choker" train has really picked up steam. Even Marino bashers can't say Dan was ever on a team that was expected to win it all. As for Kelly, you can't really say he ever played particularly well in a Super Bowl unlike Thomas who was phenomenal in Super Bowl XXV.

 

Bob Henry

Footballguy
Bradshaw's quote sums it all up rather well for me.

"My daddy taught me that a long time ago, that you fight your own battles. The only way to shut everybody up is to win."

To each his own.

Until Peyton wins the Super Bowl, I'm afraid he better get used to it.

Peyton is making HUGE jack and potentially at the cost of the team. When you put yourself in that type of a leadership position, then you better prepare yourself for the naysayers if you're not successful.

Without getting into semantics about "successful".. It's clear that if Peyton doesn't win the SB, then he'll continue to hear about it from the media, fans, haters, etc.

So, again.. Winning takes care of everything, just like Terry said.

btw, I can't think of a better person (besides Terry) to speak on this subject considering the amount of flack he took in his first years as the Steelers QB. He was bashed. He won. Now he's a HOFer. I'm sure Peyton would love to follow his path, but until he does, he'll be open to criticism.

It goes with the territory.
:goodposting: Whether it's fair or not, deserved or not, Manning is going to have that label until he wins a Super Bowl. If you were to ask me to bet, I would say he absolutely WILL win at least one SB and when he does, all this talk will vanish away.

As I mentioned in another thread recently, Elway and Marino are classic examples of this. Once Elway won back-to-back Super Bowls, the criticism fell way, way, WAY down and only the most ardent Elway haters moved on to the "well he never won a SB without Terrell Davis." Marino, on the other hand, never won the SB and thus is burdened by that stigma for eternity.
Thanks Jason.. but I'm not as confident about Manning winning a SB. There are a lot of reasons for my doubts, but as I mentioned, the biggest problem might be the problems which Manning could cause for the team with regards to the salary cap.I don't know the details and maybe his contract is more cap "friendly" than I know about (front loaded, buried money, whatever).

I'm also not sold on Peyton's killer instinct or ability to rise up and win on the bigger stage when defenses really start bearing down. I've been fooled by Peyton numerous times. I _REALLY_ thought this was his year and the Colts' year. Obviously not.

I don't know if he'll ever get an easier path to the Super Bowl and (just like my Oilers and Warren Moon) if the Colts don't change their offensive philosophy, style of play and ultimately curb some of Peyton's freestyling with audibles, then I don't know if they'll be able to go on the road and win in the playoffs against physical teams with the proven formula of great defense and strong running games.

It doesn't bode well for the Colts. They don't do well against teams that can control the clock, knock them out of their rhythm and force Manning into more bad situations where he HAS to throw the football.

Getting back to the point though.. It's never good when your daddy speaks up for you in the media. I'm sure Peyton is probably a little red-faced over it as well.

The thing is.. Peyton is running out of excuses.

Good defense? Check.

Home field advantage? Check.

We shall see. For now, I'll just approach Peyton Manning in the playoffs like the WHO once sang.. "I won't be fooled again!"

 

Frenchy Fuqua

Footballguy
It struck me on Sunday that Tom Brady (10-1 playoff record) and Peyton Manning (3-6 playoff record) aren't only different players on the field but off it as well. Brady won't do a Visa commercial without his O-line. Manning calls out his O-line after a playoff loss. Also, Brady worked a much more cap-friendly (team) contract than Manning.

 
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ICON211

Footballguy
Thanks Jason.. but I'm not as confident about Manning winning a SB. There are a lot of reasons for my doubts, but as I mentioned, the biggest problem might be the problems which Manning could cause for the team with regards to the salary cap.

I don't know the details and maybe his contract is more cap "friendly" than I know about (front loaded, buried money, whatever).

I'm also not sold on Peyton's killer instinct or ability to rise up and win on the bigger stage when defenses really start bearing down. I've been fooled by Peyton numerous times. I _REALLY_ thought this was his year and the Colts' year. Obviously not.

I don't know if he'll ever get an easier path to the Super Bowl and (just like my Oilers and Warren Moon) if the Colts don't change their offensive philosophy, style of play and ultimately curb some of Peyton's freestyling with audibles, then I don't know if they'll be able to go on the road and win in the playoffs against physical teams with the proven formula of great defense and strong running games.

It doesn't bode well for the Colts. They don't do well against teams that can control the clock, knock them out of their rhythm and force Manning into more bad situations where he HAS to throw the football.

Getting back to the point though.. It's never good when your daddy speaks up for you in the media. I'm sure Peyton is probably a little red-faced over it as well.

The thing is.. Peyton is running out of excuses.

Good defense? Check.

Home field advantage? Check.

We shall see. For now, I'll just approach Peyton Manning in the playoffs like the WHO once sang.. "I won't be fooled again!"
Its really quite unbelievable when you think about it. How great is this guy if everything has to be set up perfectly for him to win? First it was the excuses of the poor defense and playing outdoors. Now its that he was under pressure. What QB dosen't face defensive pressure in the playoffs? This is the football and defenses pressure the QB especially in the playoffs.
 
Might have something to do with the way they carry themselves or that they think they are above the game and the league or that they have been handed the world.  What other player other than Eli gets to choose which team he plays for coming out of college?
Peyton Manning carries himself very well, and I don't think he thinks of himself as being owed anything. That is more inside your head than his, I'm sure of it.
I guess it was just in my head where he blamed the loss on his O line.
Truth hurts.
Sure does. 3-6 with awful, AWFUL performances.
Some were, some were not, and some were somwhere in the middle.
 
It struck me on Sunday that Tom Brady (10-1 playoff record) and Peyton Manning (3-6 playoff record) aren't only different players on the field but off it as well. Brady won't do a Visa commercial without his O-line. Manning calls out his O-line after a playoff loss. Also, Brady worked a much more cap-friendly (team) contract than Manning.
...and Brady looks at ch.., uh, uh, porn. :D
 

Joe Bryant

Guide
Staff member
What other player other than Eli gets to choose which team he plays for coming out of college?
Hi Icon,The answer is any player that is going to be a top pick and has the money already to call the bluff and make good on a threat to hold out and not play.

I think John Elway was the last one.

Matt Leinart or Reggie Bush could do exactly the same thing. It's GM's "golden rule". When you have the gold (and in this case gold plus talent) you make the rules.

It's reality.

J

 

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