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Advice on becoming gluten free? (1 Viewer)

wazoo11

Footballguy
Usually I can grab leftovers from my fridge but today I got a call to work at the last minute and had no available leftovers. I was able to grab a Energy Bar and some nuts for lunch but I would have preferred something a little more substantial.

Anyone here gluten free? If so, what's your reasoning?

I have really toyed with the idea a lot lately, but I am not sure if this is a good idea. TIA.

 

Nick Vermeil

Footballguy
Start hiding money. My wife is gluten free and the snacks and staples she eats cost a fortune. But she feels better and is a whole lot happier so what the hell.

 

culdeus

Have good
There are just as many people on gluten free diets that don't need to be as there are people not on gluten free diets that need to be.

That being said I'm basically off gluten and it's not a big deal. I don't do the expensive substitution food either. Most of that stuff tastes like sawdust.

I used to be running to a toilet 2-3x a week and couldn't figure out what the hell that was about. Not sure why it took me so long to come around on it and try it out. Now my poop patiently awaits it's turn.

 
I lost weight when I avoided gluten. I gained it back when I stopped avoiding gluten. Similarly, my acid reflux issues lessened.

This could all be coincidence. It's quite possible that avoiding pizza, pasta, and sandwiches just made it easier to lose weight. And that losing weight helped my reflux issues.

I guess what I'd say that is that I probably agree with those who say that you don't need to avoid gluten like some deadly toxin if you don't have celiac. Which means that you can probably have a soup without worrying about it being thickened with some flour. I wouldn't seek out many substitutes, though. Having crappy pizza just makes you want good pizza. I normally just had a salad with double protein at lunch. In a bind, I'd just have cottage cheese or greek yogurt or something.

 
I lost weight when I avoided gluten. I gained it back when I stopped avoiding gluten. Similarly, my acid reflux issues lessened.

This could all be coincidence. It's quite possible that avoiding pizza, pasta, and sandwiches just made it easier to lose weight.
Well it looks like you cut way down on carbs so...
And probably, to be honest, on calories. There are only so many things we eat. If you restrict something (and if you don't pathologically replace it with something) you're probably eating less.

I think the point is that there's no reason to believe that wheat (even whole wheat) is some thing that's particularly good for you compared to other foods. There's no reason to prefer it over potatoes or rice. Much less over good protein sources or vegetables. So I don't think there's any harm to trying to avoid gluten. You'll probably feel better, even if the gluten has nothing to do with it.

People with weight issues, like me, just can't eat whatever we want when we want it. We have to do something to limit what we eat. I think there are lots of viable ways to do that, but I think avoiding gluten can be part of that plan.

 

R Dizzle

Footballguy
Good luck.

I've been GF for a year after I found out I had Celiac Disease. I've had it for atleast 10 years but I had no idea something was wrong.

It's fairly expensive to be GF. When eating out I pretty much choose Mexican or a Steakhouse. Salads most other places.

 

R Dizzle

Footballguy
I've also gained weight since Gluten Free. I'm always hungry when the carbs are less available.

Before I went GF I could eat and eat without gaining weight. Most foods went right through me.

 

culdeus

Have good
I've also gained weight since Gluten Free. I'm always hungry when the carbs are less available.

Before I went GF I could eat and eat without gaining weight. Most foods went right through me.
Are your other carbs simple sugars or sugary drinks? Otherwise this doesn't make sense. Carbs have nearly no role in making you feel full.

 
I've also gained weight since Gluten Free. I'm always hungry when the carbs are less available.

Before I went GF I could eat and eat without gaining weight. Most foods went right through me.
Are your other carbs simple sugars or sugary drinks? Otherwise this doesn't make sense. Carbs have nearly no role in making you feel full.
The guy also has celiac. It makes a certain amount of sense that he'd gain weight avoiding gluten. That's good. He's maintaining nutrition now.

 

proninja

Footballguy
Gluten free is a fad, but avoiding wheat (the primary source of gluten in our diets) is going to be a good thing for most people.

I don't worry at all about the gluten in spelt or barley, but I don't eat much wheat at all.

 

ArbyMelt

Footballguy
I've been wheat free for over a year. Had some very bad acid reflux episodes. Zero since going wheat free. I won't eat wheat again, thats how bad my acid reflux was at times.

I'm used to it, when I snack, its chips and salsa, or potato chips and dip. Fast food stuff .... we usually do Chipotle, or Baked Potato with brisket at local place, maybe a salad at Wendy's. Its hard to find something when you don't cook. My wife does it too, she lost a few lbs, and feels less bloated.

The Wheat Belly blog is a good one if you want more info.

 

R Dizzle

Footballguy
culdeus said:
R Dizzle said:
I've also gained weight since Gluten Free. I'm always hungry when the carbs are less available.

Before I went GF I could eat and eat without gaining weight. Most foods went right through me.
Are your other carbs simple sugars or sugary drinks? Otherwise this doesn't make sense. Carbs have nearly no role in making you feel full.
I don't eat simple sugars nor do I drink sugary drinks. I seem to feel hungry unless I eat some form of complex carb.

 

Mister CIA

Footballguy
proninja said:
Gluten free is a fad, but avoiding wheat (the primary source of gluten in our diets) is going to be a good thing for most people.

I don't worry at all about the gluten in spelt or barley, but I don't eat much wheat at all.
Concur. I'll probably never pin down the facts, but wheat seems to bother me a lot while I'm fine with other gluten-laden foods (and beverages).

 

[icon]

Insoxicated
Ignoratio Elenchi said:
wazoo11 said:
Anyone here gluten free? If so, what's your reasoning?
I'm pretty sure the only real reason to go gluten-free is if you have Celiac disease. Pretty much everyone else is just blindly jumping into a bizarre diet fad with no real benefits.
Yep.

Buddy's GF just went gluten free... Was convinced she was fat because of gluten. Doc backed her up.

Her mowing down an entire bag of potato chips later that night after drinking a bottle and a half of wine seems to indicate the problem may lay elsewhere. :rolleyes:

But whenever we go out she loves to make a HUGE deal about it though...

 

eoMMan

Footballguy
proninja said:
Gluten free is a fad, but avoiding wheat (the primary source of gluten in our diets) is going to be a good thing for most people.

I don't worry at all about the gluten in spelt or barley, but I don't eat much wheat at all.
Why is wheat so bad for you?

 

Schlzm

Footballguy
tl;dr after the fifth post. Is it possible that it isn't gluten but what you would stack on top of it that might be the problem? Is it the pizza dough or one of the 60,000,000,000 toppings that's causing your problems? Food elimination is a stepped process.

Schlzm

ETA: Artificial things like bleaching agents and non-sugar sweeteners are more likely to cause issues than gluten. Though of course we could all just blame Monsanto at this point I think and be safe.

 
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culdeus

Have good
culdeus said:
R Dizzle said:
I've also gained weight since Gluten Free. I'm always hungry when the carbs are less available.

Before I went GF I could eat and eat without gaining weight. Most foods went right through me.
Are your other carbs simple sugars or sugary drinks? Otherwise this doesn't make sense. Carbs have nearly no role in making you feel full.
I don't eat simple sugars nor do I drink sugary drinks. I seem to feel hungry unless I eat some form of complex carb.
Virtually no study in recorded history backs this up. It may be psychological.

 

E-Z Glider

Footballguy
People dont go GF to lose weight (if they are, they're doing it wrong), they do it because they believe it will make them feel better. Its not a diet-fad, its a feel-good-fad.

The combination of placebo effect and cutting a lot of bad stuff from their diet pretty much guarantees most people will instantly feel better (about themselves) and many will boast of amazing results, but its too restrictive for them to maintain (see Otis diet/weight/exercise threads).

They'd probably get the same benefits from eating a healthy diet, but what fun is that?

 

culdeus

Have good
People dont go GF to lose weight (if they are, they're doing it wrong), they do it because they believe it will make them feel better. Its not a diet-fad, its a feel-good-fad.

The combination of placebo effect and cutting a lot of bad stuff from their diet pretty much guarantees most people will instantly feel better (about themselves) and many will boast of amazing results, but its too restrictive for them to maintain (see Otis diet/weight/exercise threads).

They'd probably get the same benefits from eating a healthy diet, but what fun is that?
Gluten products are by and large energy dense food. Swapping it out nearly certainly makes one pick up less energy dense foods as a replacement, or ones with better macro profiles. Both of these are going to cause weight loss.

If you simply take gluten out and swap in GF breads with a similar caloric load you won't lose any weight at all. I think pretty much everyone understands that.

 

17seconds

root of all aliai
My wife did it because she believes gluten caused her to get sick (stomach type of sick). She says she feels a lot better being gluten free. However, it makes you really intolerant to gluten. If she falls off the wagon and has a bite of pizza she's on the crapper all day.

EDIT: My wife started it before it was a fad - been doing it for at least 3 years now. It was tough in the beginning because there were almost no gluten free products and they were terrible. Now because it's a fad it's fairly easy to do. I eat gluten free pasta all the time and it's fine.

 
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R Dizzle

Footballguy
culdeus said:
R Dizzle said:
I've also gained weight since Gluten Free. I'm always hungry when the carbs are less available.

Before I went GF I could eat and eat without gaining weight. Most foods went right through me.
Are your other carbs simple sugars or sugary drinks? Otherwise this doesn't make sense. Carbs have nearly no role in making you feel full.
I don't eat simple sugars nor do I drink sugary drinks. I seem to feel hungry unless I eat some form of complex carb.
Virtually no study in recorded history backs this up. It may be psychological.
Could very well be.

 

Ignoratio Elenchi

Footballguy
So what's wrong with the rest of us trying a gluten-free diet a try to see how we feel?

For starters, going gluten-free means saying no to many common and nutritious foods. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. Gluten also shows up in many whole grain foods related to wheat, including bulgur, farro, kamut, spelt, and triticale (a hybrid of wheat and rye). Some celiac disease experts warn patients to steer clear of oats, as well.

Gluten itself doesn’t offer special nutritional benefits. But the many whole grains that contain gluten do. They’re rich in an array of vitamins and minerals, such as B vitamins and iron, as well as fiber. Studies show that whole grain foods, as part of a healthy diet, may help lower risk of heart disease, type-2 diabetes, and some forms of cancer. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that half of all carbohydrates in the diet come from whole grain products.

To be sure, a few whole grains don’t contain gluten, including amaranth, millet, and quinoa. But they are far less common than gluten-containing grains. Meeting the dietary guidelines goal is very tough if you have to eliminate wheat, barley, rye, kamut, and other gluten-containing whole grains.

Because wheat is ubiquitous in the American diet, completely eliminating gluten requires adopting a whole new diet. You would have to up most breads, crackers, breakfast cereals, conventional pastas, pastry goods, and a wide range of processed foods made with small amounts of gluten.

"And any time you eliminate whole categories of food you’ve been used to eating, you run the risk of nutritional deficiencies," said Green. A 2005 report from the American Dietetic Association warned that gluten-free products tend to be low in a wide range of important nutrients, including B vitamins, calcium, iron, zinc, magnesium, and fiber.

There’s little point in taking that risk unless you genuinely have celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. "Eating a healthy gluten-free diet means paying constant attention to what you eat. This isn’t something that anyone should do casually," said Green.

There’s also little point in eliminating just some gluten. For people who are sensitive, even trace amounts can cause damage to the small intestines. "So an almost gluten-free diet isn’t going to help if you have a problem."
 

danielmclark

Footballguy
proninja said:
Gluten free is a fad, but avoiding wheat (the primary source of gluten in our diets) is going to be a good thing for most people.

I don't worry at all about the gluten in spelt or barley, but I don't eat much wheat at all.
Why is wheat so bad for you?
It isn't. And anyone who says so is either lying, has an agenda (trying to sell a book or diet plan), or is simply misinformed. Wheat has been a staple of the human diet for literally thousands of years. But we're going through an obesity epidemic in this country over the past couple of decades and everyone wants to try to find a scapegoat.

Some people, a sliver of a minority, can have adverse reactions to wheat/gluten. But to say removing wheat would be a "good thing for most people" is utter garbage.

 

culdeus

Have good
So what's wrong with the rest of us trying a gluten-free diet a try to see how we feel?

For starters, going gluten-free means saying no to many common and nutritious foods. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. Gluten also shows up in many whole grain foods related to wheat, including bulgur, farro, kamut, spelt, and triticale (a hybrid of wheat and rye). Some celiac disease experts warn patients to steer clear of oats, as well.

Gluten itself doesn’t offer special nutritional benefits. But the many whole grains that contain gluten do. They’re rich in an array of vitamins and minerals, such as B vitamins and iron, as well as fiber. Studies show that whole grain foods, as part of a healthy diet, may help lower risk of heart disease, type-2 diabetes, and some forms of cancer. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that half of all carbohydrates in the diet come from whole grain products.

To be sure, a few whole grains don’t contain gluten, including amaranth, millet, and quinoa. But they are far less common than gluten-containing grains. Meeting the dietary guidelines goal is very tough if you have to eliminate wheat, barley, rye, kamut, and other gluten-containing whole grains.

Because wheat is ubiquitous in the American diet, completely eliminating gluten requires adopting a whole new diet. You would have to up most breads, crackers, breakfast cereals, conventional pastas, pastry goods, and a wide range of processed foods made with small amounts of gluten.

"And any time you eliminate whole categories of food you’ve been used to eating, you run the risk of nutritional deficiencies," said Green. A 2005 report from the American Dietetic Association warned that gluten-free products tend to be low in a wide range of important nutrients, including B vitamins, calcium, iron, zinc, magnesium, and fiber.

There’s little point in taking that risk unless you genuinely have celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. "Eating a healthy gluten-free diet means paying constant attention to what you eat. This isn’t something that anyone should do casually," said Green.

There’s also little point in eliminating just some gluten. For people who are sensitive, even trace amounts can cause damage to the small intestines. "So an almost gluten-free diet isn’t going to help if you have a problem."
If you eat red meat this isn't an issue, and fiber may be more the problem than gluten itself. Some early studies are showing that it isn't really the gluten so much as it is the high fiber diets that are causing people to have the :toilet: issues most commonly attributed to gluten.

 

phrozen

Footballguy
So what's wrong with the rest of us trying a gluten-free diet a try to see how we feel?

For starters, going gluten-free means saying no to many common and nutritious foods. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. Gluten also shows up in many whole grain foods related to wheat, including bulgur, farro, kamut, spelt, and triticale (a hybrid of wheat and rye). Some celiac disease experts warn patients to steer clear of oats, as well.

Gluten itself doesn’t offer special nutritional benefits. But the many whole grains that contain gluten do. They’re rich in an array of vitamins and minerals, such as B vitamins and iron, as well as fiber. Studies show that whole grain foods, as part of a healthy diet, may help lower risk of heart disease, type-2 diabetes, and some forms of cancer. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that half of all carbohydrates in the diet come from whole grain products.

To be sure, a few whole grains don’t contain gluten, including amaranth, millet, and quinoa. But they are far less common than gluten-containing grains. Meeting the dietary guidelines goal is very tough if you have to eliminate wheat, barley, rye, kamut, and other gluten-containing whole grains.

Because wheat is ubiquitous in the American diet, completely eliminating gluten requires adopting a whole new diet. You would have to up most breads, crackers, breakfast cereals, conventional pastas, pastry goods, and a wide range of processed foods made with small amounts of gluten.

"And any time you eliminate whole categories of food you’ve been used to eating, you run the risk of nutritional deficiencies," said Green. A 2005 report from the American Dietetic Association warned that gluten-free products tend to be low in a wide range of important nutrients, including B vitamins, calcium, iron, zinc, magnesium, and fiber.

There’s little point in taking that risk unless you genuinely have celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. "Eating a healthy gluten-free diet means paying constant attention to what you eat. This isn’t something that anyone should do casually," said Green.

There’s also little point in eliminating just some gluten. For people who are sensitive, even trace amounts can cause damage to the small intestines. "So an almost gluten-free diet isn’t going to help if you have a problem."
I'd disagree with the author saying grains are a nutritious food

 
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phrozen

Footballguy
I lost weight when I avoided gluten. I gained it back when I stopped avoiding gluten. Similarly, my acid reflux issues lessened.

This could all be coincidence. It's quite possible that avoiding pizza, pasta, and sandwiches just made it easier to lose weight.
Well it looks like you cut way down on carbs so...
And probably, to be honest, on calories. There are only so many things we eat. If you restrict something (and if you don't pathologically replace it with something) you're probably eating less.

I think the point is that there's no reason to believe that wheat (even whole wheat) is some thing that's particularly good for you compared to other foods. There's no reason to prefer it over potatoes or rice. Much less over good protein sources or vegetables. So I don't think there's any harm to trying to avoid gluten. You'll probably feel better, even if the gluten has nothing to do with it.

People with weight issues, like me, just can't eat whatever we want when we want it. We have to do something to limit what we eat. I think there are lots of viable ways to do that, but I think avoiding gluten can be part of that plan.
sorry to hear you are off of Paleo scoob - when did this happen? I admit I haven't been following the primal/paleo thread. may need to jump back in.

 

Deepster

Footballguy
Gluten can lead to a lot of not so good things and you don't "need" it. My advice would be to:

a) Read up a good deal and make your own choice if it's something you want to try and, if so....

b) Give it 45 days and see if you feel better.

It's not a weight loss tool. It doesn't hurt to educate yourself on what goes in your body and experience how things make you feel.

If you decide to try, PM and I can give you more product/recipe info.

 

proninja

Footballguy
Gluten free is a fad, but avoiding wheat (the primary source of gluten in our diets) is going to be a good thing for most people.

I don't worry at all about the gluten in spelt or barley, but I don't eat much wheat at all.
Why is wheat so bad for you?
It isn't. And anyone who says so is either lying, has an agenda (trying to sell a book or diet plan), or is simply misinformed. Wheat has been a staple of the human diet for literally thousands of years. But we're going through an obesity epidemic in this country over the past couple of decades and everyone wants to try to find a scapegoat.

Some people, a sliver of a minority, can have adverse reactions to wheat/gluten. But to say removing wheat would be a "good thing for most people" is utter garbage.
I see that you are a scholar on this subject. What research and studies have you done into the nutritional differences and long term effects between what wheat used to be and what the modern semi-dwarf wheat is? I would love to learn from someone so clearly knowledgeable as yourself.

 
I lost weight when I avoided gluten. I gained it back when I stopped avoiding gluten. Similarly, my acid reflux issues lessened.

This could all be coincidence. It's quite possible that avoiding pizza, pasta, and sandwiches just made it easier to lose weight.
Well it looks like you cut way down on carbs so...
And probably, to be honest, on calories. There are only so many things we eat. If you restrict something (and if you don't pathologically replace it with something) you're probably eating less.

I think the point is that there's no reason to believe that wheat (even whole wheat) is some thing that's particularly good for you compared to other foods. There's no reason to prefer it over potatoes or rice. Much less over good protein sources or vegetables. So I don't think there's any harm to trying to avoid gluten. You'll probably feel better, even if the gluten has nothing to do with it.

People with weight issues, like me, just can't eat whatever we want when we want it. We have to do something to limit what we eat. I think there are lots of viable ways to do that, but I think avoiding gluten can be part of that plan.
sorry to hear you are off of Paleo scoob - when did this happen? I admit I haven't been following the primal/paleo thread. may need to jump back in.
Bunch of irrelevant lifestyle stuff happened. Got a new job and got causal with where I got my lunch. Lost the new job and started eating whatever the hell I wanted because I was depressed.

I still believe that something kind of close to modern Paleo 2.0 is the best way for me to eat. My problem is that frustrating to think that I have to worry about anything pretty much 24/7 to get the results I want. I tend to commit to something for a short while and then get bored. It's nothing to do with the diet and everything to do with me.

 

kface

Footballguy
So what's wrong with the rest of us trying a gluten-free diet a try to see how we feel?
No beer
There are lots of gluten free beers

My wife is celiac so we are pretty much gluten free. I don't miss anything...most gluten products are just ugly empty calories anyway. We eat a lot of whole grain rice, quinoa, amaranth and use things like almost flours for crust when we make a pumpkin pie...its delicious and so much better for you.

 

17seconds

root of all aliai
killface said:
17seconds said:
So what's wrong with the rest of us trying a gluten-free diet a try to see how we feel?
No beer
There are lots of gluten free beers

My wife is celiac so we are pretty much gluten free. I don't miss anything...most gluten products are just ugly empty calories anyway. We eat a lot of whole grain rice, quinoa, amaranth and use things like almost flours for crust when we make a pumpkin pie...its delicious and so much better for you.
yes and they are horrible

Agree with you that everything else is OK, but the beer is by far the biggest issue. Especially when you live in an area with a huge microbrew scene. It actually affects me because my wife can't do anything at a brewery so it's difficult for me to get away to one. If my wife could drink real beer we'd both be getting a lot more fun beer time.

 

JerseyToughGuys

Tough Guy
and FWIW, they are improving the gluten free products by the minute. The stuff today is marketedly better than it was a year ago. Pasta, crackers, cookies, cakes, ect.

Pizza still sucks, for the most part. The exception has been a wood fired pizza from a local joint.

 

kface

Footballguy
killface said:
17seconds said:
So what's wrong with the rest of us trying a gluten-free diet a try to see how we feel?
No beer
My wife is celiac so we are pretty much gluten free.
Ouch.
Meh, her health is important to me and cross contamination can be a huge issue for those with celiac. I don't feel like I am losing much in the big picture and she is much healthier because of it.

On the beer front, most gf beers aren't exactly craft beers, but I have tried quite a few that are significantly better than coors, bud etc....

 
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killface said:
17seconds said:
So what's wrong with the rest of us trying a gluten-free diet a try to see how we feel?
No beer
My wife is celiac so we are pretty much gluten free.
Ouch.
Meh, her health is important to me and cross contamination can be a huge issue for those with celiac. I don't feel like I am losing much in the big picture and she is much healthier because of it.

On the beer front, most gf beers aren't exactly craft beers, but I have tried quite a few that are significantly better than coors, bud etc....
wtf

 

kface

Footballguy
killface said:
17seconds said:
So what's wrong with the rest of us trying a gluten-free diet a try to see how we feel?
No beer
My wife is celiac so we are pretty much gluten free.
Ouch.
Meh, her health is important to me and cross contamination can be a huge issue for those with celiac. I don't feel like I am losing much in the big picture and she is much healthier because of it.

On the beer front, most gf beers aren't exactly craft beers, but I have tried quite a few that are significantly better than coors, bud etc....
wtf
Cross contamination is when you use the same counter for glutenous products as you do for gf, or the same oven rack, or the same frying pan etc...

Celiac disease is the body attacking itself. It is incredibly unhealthy to allow it do that so people with it are usually very careful about this. I have noticed a lot of restaurants that aren't strictly gluten free have switched from 'gluten free' to 'no gluten added' because of cross contamination in the kitchen. Saying you are gf can end in a law suit apparently.

 
killface said:
17seconds said:
So what's wrong with the rest of us trying a gluten-free diet a try to see how we feel?
No beer
My wife is celiac so we are pretty much gluten free.
Ouch.
Meh, her health is important to me and cross contamination can be a huge issue for those with celiac. I don't feel like I am losing much in the big picture and she is much healthier because of it.

On the beer front, most gf beers aren't exactly craft beers, but I have tried quite a few that are significantly better than coors, bud etc....
wtf
Cross contamination is when you use the same counter for glutenous products as you do for gf, or the same oven rack, or the same frying pan etc...

Celiac disease is the body attacking itself. It is incredibly unhealthy to allow it do that so people with it are usually very careful about this. I have noticed a lot of restaurants that aren't strictly gluten free have switched from 'gluten free' to 'no gluten added' because of cross contamination in the kitchen. Saying you are gf can end in a law suit apparently.
Jesus. Didn't know gluten was radioactive.

 

Maurile Tremblay

Administrator
Staff member
Most junk food has gluten in it, so going gluten-free can be a decent way to avoid junk food even if gluten itself isn't the problem.

It defeats the purpose, though, if you start eating gluten-free junk food. The idea is to eat an apple instead of cake, not to eat gluten-free "cake" instead of cake. (If you've got celiac disease and really want cake, then "cake" might fit the bill. Otherwise, I don't see the point.)

 

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