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Middle Aged Dummies!! Artists #1's have been posted!! (3 Viewers)

Interesting to see one of my favorite Modest Mouse songs come in at 28.
I didn't sequence them by rank---my #31 and #29 are in my top 5-7 favorites.

I tried to sequence them for playlist purposes. This would've been a bit higher if I was ranking, but not by a lot. Still a great song.

I kinda wish I'd just listed them by rank.

Float On is #26?

I'm a casual MM fan so maybe I've been sleeping through their catalog. Looking forward to the next 26. :thumbup:
I've said this 2 or 3 times. You even thumbs upped that explanation I gave above a couple days ago.

Now I really wish I'd just ranked them in order. But, I actually do like several Modest Mouse songs more than Float On :shrug:
It's ok, it's fun when things aren't chalk. Born to Run came in even lower than this so we call have our POV. It's cool.
 
27. Poem 58
Album: Chicago Transit Authority (1969)
Writer: Robert Lamm
Lead vocals: Robert Lamm
Released as a single? No

Chicago was at heart an experimental band when they started out, aiming to bring elements not normally seen in rock groups, and Poem 58 is the most successful of their debut album's most experimental tracks. It is an 8.5-minute tour de force of psychedelia and dramatic tension. The all-instrumental first half is a showcase for Terry Kath, first laying down chunky rhythmic slices and then shredding like the other guitar gods of the day -- much of that passage is just guitar, bass and drums, the power trio format that Hendrix, Clapton, etc. worked in. The second half is a slinky slice of swinging -- imagine stoner kids trying to play Stax -- with an insistent bass groove, a heartfelt vocal from Lamm and more guitar heroics from Kath. Hendrix adored the band when he encountered them at the Whiskey Au Go Go (and later had them open for him), and I would not be surprised if this was the tune that drew him in. @KarmaPolice -- you will want to Pick. The. Bong. Up. for this one.

Live version from 1969 (at the Fillmore West in August, where Bill Graham booked them so he could replace them on the Woodstock bill with Santana): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PfLBnLceRQ4

Chicago Transit Authority is one of the greatest debut albums of all time and IMO remains the band's best record. It is a double because the band produced so much good material in the five days they were given for recording that Columbia agreed to put it out as a double in exchange for a cut in the band's royalty rate -- not the last time the band wouldn't think things through in terms of finances. The band worked feverishly after moving from Chicago to Los Angeles, not only in terms of gigging but in terms of writing originals. These are the songs that first put their concept of a "rock band with horns" to the test, and they passed with flying colors. Most of the tracks were written by Robert Lamm, who wrote or cowrote seven of the album's 12 tracks; Terry Kath penned two (one of which is an experiment more than a song), James Pankow penned one and collaborated on another with Lamm, one is a cover and one is a "field recording" credited to producer/manager Jim Guercio. Half of its tracks appear in my top 31, tied for the most with Chicago VII, and the most from a percentage perspective.
One reason why CTA has held up so well is that it was the band's only album that was recorded without an explicit intent to cater to pop radio. There are catchy songs on it, some of which got plenty of radio play, but there are also lengthy tracks with jamming, raging guitar workouts, political rantings and philosophical musings. This record was pitched at hippies and college students, not Midwestern housewives. As such, it was a slow burn on the charts, and was the band's only studio album released in Terry Kath's lifetime that did not hit the top 10. Nor did it produce any major hit singles until two years after its release (Columbia issued singles from the first two albums in the second half of 1971 after the first two singles from III didn't hit the top 10). However, as a testament to the quality of the material and the word-of-mouth nature of how it got popular, it set the record for most consecutive weeks on the Billboard top 200 albums chart until the release of The Dark Side of the Moon.
As Guercio put it in the liner notes:
"The purpose of this commentary ... is an attempt at documenting the complete rejection of any name label, title or verbal reference relative to the performance contained herein. Corporately as well as individually, this artist endeavors to be judged in terms of contribution alone rather than through the tag affixed upon it. The printed word can never aspire to document a truly musical experience, so if you must call them something, speak of the city where all save one* were born; where all of them were schooled and bred, and where all of this incredible music went down barely noticed; call them CHICAGO."

* - actually two (Robert Lamm was born in Brooklyn and James Pankow was born in Missouri)

At #26 we have a super psychedelic song (with flute!) that on its respective album appears between what may be the band's two most legendary efforts.
 
Interesting to see one of my favorite Modest Mouse songs come in at 28.
I didn't sequence them by rank---my #31 and #29 are in my top 5-7 favorites.

I tried to sequence them for playlist purposes. This would've been a bit higher if I was ranking, but not by a lot. Still a great song.

I kinda wish I'd just listed them by rank.

Float On is #26?

I'm a casual MM fan so maybe I've been sleeping through their catalog. Looking forward to the next 26. :thumbup:
I've said this 2 or 3 times. You even thumbs upped that explanation I gave above a couple days ago.

Now I really wish I'd just ranked them in order. But, I actually do like several Modest Mouse songs more than Float On :shrug:
It's ok, it's fun when things aren't chalk. Born to Run came in even lower than this so we call have our POV. It's cool.
I tried to sequence the songs for the playlist rather than in any order of favorites.

I may suck at playlists, though. :lmao:
 
Interesting to see one of my favorite Modest Mouse songs come in at 28.
I didn't sequence them by rank---my #31 and #29 are in my top 5-7 favorites.

I tried to sequence them for playlist purposes. This would've been a bit higher if I was ranking, but not by a lot. Still a great song.

I kinda wish I'd just listed them by rank.

Float On is #26?

I'm a casual MM fan so maybe I've been sleeping through their catalog. Looking forward to the next 26. :thumbup:
I've said this 2 or 3 times. You even thumbs upped that explanation I gave above a couple days ago.

Now I really wish I'd just ranked them in order. But, I actually do like several Modest Mouse songs more than Float On :shrug:
It's ok, it's fun when things aren't chalk. Born to Run came in even lower than this so we call have our POV. It's cool.
I tried to sequence the songs for the playlist rather than in any order of favorites.

I may suck at playlists, though. :lmao:
Well it's impossible to tell until your full playlist comes out. It's hard to make them flow when they are squeezed between other artists and songs you had no way of knowing about.
 
Interesting to see one of my favorite Modest Mouse songs come in at 28.
I didn't sequence them by rank---my #31 and #29 are in my top 5-7 favorites.

I tried to sequence them for playlist purposes. This would've been a bit higher if I was ranking, but not by a lot. Still a great song.

I kinda wish I'd just listed them by rank.

Float On is #26?

I'm a casual MM fan so maybe I've been sleeping through their catalog. Looking forward to the next 26. :thumbup:
I've said this 2 or 3 times. You even thumbs upped that explanation I gave above a couple days ago.

Now I really wish I'd just ranked them in order. But, I actually do like several Modest Mouse songs more than Float On :shrug:
DOH! :homer:

In my defense there's an awful lot to follow. :bag:
 
Random thoughts on some of the #27s I already know:

Binky took The Seven Rays in the US countdown, so many of us should have heard it before. It's from when Todd was at his proggiest and most "cosmic", but its jamming never loses focus. As for the lyrics, well, LSD, man.
It's Alright for You is another banger from the first Police album. It's a good example of their "covert virtuosity" -- Sting played jazz and Copeland and Summers played prog before they started a band at the height of punk, so if they wanted to sell records in the UK, they could only show off their chops subtly. Listen to what the bass and drums do after the first wave of power chords.
My '00s self loved Float On but didn't care much for the other Modest Mouse material I heard. Their reputation as a terrible live band (dunno if accurate, but that was the word) prevented me from delving in any further. I am enjoying the opportunity to do that now.
I LOVE Genesis' Trespass album, technically their second but really their first because they didn't have creative control on their debut. The rest of the material is more ornate and in-your-face, so Dusk is a nice breather in the middle of all that, and as YM said, has some of Peter Gabriel's best early lyrics.
Tween/teen me loved State of Confusion and would turn it up whenever it came on the radio or MTV. And I went nuts when it was in the setlist when the Kinks played my college campus freshman year (spring of 1990).
The Pass is one of my favorite post-synth-era Rush songs. Always loved Geddy's bass parts on it. Great melody from Lee/Lifeson and lyrics from Peart. My top 31 would be heavy on Moving Pictures and before, but this might well make it.
I would get wistful when Ryan Adams' New York, New York came on the radio. I was lucky not to lose anyone close to me in 9/11, but I know a lot of people who did.
If You Really Love Me is one of my favorite pre-Talking Book tracks from Stevie. It's so graceful but also so grooving.
My Friend, My Friend is one of the most dramatic studio tracks from Phish, and contributes greatly to the murky vibe of the Rift album.
At the #29s I mentioned that both ELO "Woman" songs are in my top 5. Here is the other one. I dare you not to go "bwananananana" after "Eeeeeevil Woman".
TEEEE EN TEEEE! OY! OY!
Trapped became one of my favorites from Springsteen after FM radio started playing it when the USA for Africa album came out. He kept in some of the best qualities of the Jimmy Cliff original while making it his own (and not overwhelming it with his Bruce-ness).
 
27.

Coming up Roses- Elliott Smith

From self-titled album


"I'm a junkyard full of false starts
And I don't need your permission
To bury my love under this bare light bulb"


Here is a song thats different than what we've heard so far. Its a little more uptempo and dare I say... less sad? Its almost a pop song but then not quite. Its a bigger sound with the organ and Electric guitar.
 
That Chicago song is legit. What a way to start the Vegas trip!
I bought Chicago Transit Authority in college on the basis of its radio songs. When I got to this song for the first time I was :jawdrop:
This would have been my #1 had I gone with Chicago - it’s that good. Pretty sure I’ve selected it in a few drafts over the years.
There's one with kind of a similar vibe that's coming up in the not too distant future. These are the two tracks that really show what we missed when we lost Terry Kath so early.
 
I decided that I needed to trim these posts down a tad and I feel I am getting repetitive anyway.

After 5 rounds, here are the bands that I started off loving from playlist #1, and haven't let up at all:

Ray Charles, Spoon, The Police, Chicago, Clutch, deadmau5, ELO, Genesis

For me, I will declare @Pip's Invitation the winner of the 1st part of the draft. A couple of these tunes have completely caught me off guard in a great way - especially today's pick. These are the first set of artists that I will largely stop talking about in posts. You hooked me, I am loving all you are handing me, and as of now these are the first playlists I will dig into. Great tunes!


The next wave are ones that have nailed of 5 for me, and I will also largely stop talking about them daily - I am in and also loving the tunes, just that one of the 5 didn't quite stick with me:

Doves, Daft Punk, Ryan Adams, Stevie Wonder, Tragically Hip, Foo Fighters, The Hold Steady

Same thing here - I am digging into these playlists and artists more after this, but as it stands today, I'm just doing it after the first bucket of artists. Because of the unfamiliarity about them, the stand outs here for me are Doves, Ryan Adams, and Tragically Hip. I like that somebody said Doves was giving them a U2 vibe, as I thought a couple times it sounded like a mash up of u2 and Coldplay, and I also don't mean that as a negative.


The next wave would be bands that have maybe been a little more up and down for me, but the highs have been glorious and are more frequent than the misses so far:

Big Thief, Phish, Sigur Ros, The Prodigy, Simon & Garfunkel, Modest Mouse, ... and You Will Know us by the Trail of the Dead, and Elliot Smith


All others are still putting up great tunes, they are just either more familar to me, or not quite my thing more often than not. Hopefully tomorrow I will get to the shout outs for songs I loved from the bands not gushed about above. So far I am loving this format.
 
Randomness List:

Utopia - The Seven Rays (via Todd Rundgren). I honestly didn’t know who this was until I looked, but it had my attention early. All the staples of prog rock are here: numerous chord changes, driving beats, and a runtime that would probably have to be cut in half to get radio play. But I dig it, and plan to check out more.

Constructive Summer - The Hold Steady. This had energetic performances from guitar and piano. Also the name checks Lust for Life and Joe Strummer caught me by surprise. I’ve (at least) liked a few others from them so far, and this joins that list for sure.

It’s Alright For You - The Police. It’s a day of fast-paced energetic songs, and this certainly fits that bill. I’m familiar with this song, but I don’t seek it out that often. So it was good to hear it again and remind myself about it.

We All Die Young - The Decemberists. Another song with a good driving beat behind it. Overall a fairly straightforward rock song, but there’s nothing wrong with that. Especially since that pretty much describes my #26.

Mama Werewolf - Brandi Carlile. “Your Mama was a werewolf”. Words you expect from Frank Zappa, not a country song. Well, okay, country with some rock and folk in it. Anyway, I’m sure there are layers here that just one listen won’t reveal, but I can still get a good overall picture.

Nobody’s Fool - Slade. For a moment I wondered if Cinderella had covered Slade too, but no. Instead we get a very 70s song, bouncy and confident, just like you’d expect from this group. I’m not sure what being “super fool” is, but did I enjoy it? Uh huh.

--
Misc. comments:
Great song from Stevie today.
I liked this song from deadmau5 the most of what I’ve heard so far.
E-Ev-il Wo-man!
Huh, I’m sure I’ve heard the Ryan Adams song, though I’m not sure where.
Enjoyed today’s song from Spoon too.
 
Foo FightersJust Win BabyEnd Over End

This is the first of 6 songs I chose off the album In Your Honor, which is a double album. While the album and its songs were nominated for 5 Grammys, it didn't win any, which was a bit of a surprise IMO, even moreso in hindsight.

About the album, from Wikipedia:

Grohl decided against an acoustic record, saying "I have to have loud rock music in my life somewhere", and decided to make a double album, with "one CD that's all the really heavy rock ****" and another "that's really beautiful, acoustic-based, lower dynamic stuff", which Grohl described as "the bottle and the hangover"...

After the album was finished, Grohl stated that he hoped that the Foo Fighters were most remembered for this record. He described it as "just the most ****ing kick-*** thing we've ever done" and said, "If someone asked me which Led Zeppelin album to buy, I would tell them Physical Graffiti, because it has such a wide dynamic and it shows the range that band had. And that's what we wanted to do with this album."

I don't think the album is Physical Graffiti, but I love it.

As for this song, IGN described it this way:

Scratchy guitar lures you into the wondrous chug of "End Over End," which is just a great, plain rock song filled with enthusiastic vocals and a tight cohesion of the band. It's a bit generic, in the spine-tingling arena rock vein, but by the same token it's also a fist waving, lighter swaying burner.
My wife wasn't familiar with this song. The weekend Taylor passed we did what we usually do when an artist passes and shuffle their jams. We were en route from dinner to a bar when this opening riff hit and with each tone change I turned it up a little more...then a little more...a little more...and a little more...until eventually we hit the outro at the max.

WHAT IS THIS AND WHY DON'T I KNOW IT

Rock music like they won't ever make again, dear.
 
I finally had a chance to listen to the #29 playlist.

Excluding my own song, I already knew that I liked these songs:
  • ELO - Sweet Talkin' Woman
  • Heart - Alone
I didn't remember it but realized I knew and liked this song once I heard it:
  • Chicago - Wishing You Were Here
On first listen to this playlist, these were the unfamiliar songs I liked the best:
  • ...And You Will Know... - Intelligence
  • Daft Punk - Veridis Quo
  • Stranglers - All Day and All of the Night (I'm familiar with and really like the original but had not heard this cover)
  • deadmau5, Rob Swire - Ghosts 'n' Stuff
Good stuff! 👍
 
I’m so happy The Pass made the Rush list. I played the Presto album a ton when it came out and I still have strong emotions of that time when I play it again.

The Pass has special meaning for me in particular and I still get goose bumps every time I hear it.

That year, one of my good friends was having a tough time and ultimately had very serious suicidal thoughts that he fortunately never acted on. This song helped me to talk to him about things during this time and bond more than we ever had previously.

And now you're trembling on a rocky ledge
Staring down into a heartless sea
Can't face life on a razor's edge
Nothing's what you thought it would be

. . .
No hero in your tragedy
No daring in your escape
No salutes for your surrender
Nothing noble in your fate
Christ, what have you done?
. . .
Turn around and walk the razor's edge
Don't turn your back and slam the door on me



Sorry to steal your thunder on a writeup @higgins . Excellent choice.
 
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#27 - The Stranglers - Goodbye Toulouse

Year - 1977
Album - Rattus Norvegicus
UK Chart position - Non Single
Vocals - Hugh Cornwell
Key Lyric -
I walked your streets in fear
I washed your streets with tears
Toulouse
Goodbye Toulouse

Interesting Points
1- This is the first song written by one and sung by the other vocalist. This is a JJB written song but he couldnt manage the bass parts and vocals at the same time, so Cornwell sung it. After this they tried singing on each others songs to see who sounded best.

2- My songs 31-28 were deliberately chosen as an introduction. Songs 27-22 could have easily been interchanged with songs 32-40. This is one song that came from outside to boot another out at the last second.

3-Several Stranglers songs had the names of towns and Cities in them, not uncommon I guess. Because of JJBs heritage, this one and Nice in Nice namedrop French places. Nice in Nice is also a JJB song, he sings the vocals this time. That song got dropped for this one lol

4-The debut album is loaded with great material, but its all they had at the time so there wasnt much left to cut.

5-The lyrics on this are based on the Nostradamus prediction of a dire event occurring in Toulouse.

Summary to date
Year
1977 - 2
1978 - 1
1979 - 1
1980 - 0
1981 - 0
1982 - 0
1983 - 0
1984 - 0
1985 - 0
1986 - 0
1987 - 0
1988 - 1
1989 - 0
1990 onwards - 0

Where to find
Rattus Norvegicus - 2/9
No More Heroes - 0/11
Black and White - 0/12
The Raven - 1/11
The Gospel According to the Meninblack - 0/10
La Folie - 0/11
Feline - 0/9
Aural Sculpture - 0/11
Dreamtime - 0/10
All Live and All of the Night - 1/13
10 - 0/10
1991 onwards - 0
B Sides - 0
Greatest Hits - 0
Standalone Single - 1

Running Vocal Count
Hugh Cornwell - 3
Jean-Jacques Burnel - 2
Other - 0

Rundown
#31 - Walk on By
#30 - Ugly
#29 - All Day and All of the Night
#28 - Meninblack
#27 - Goodbye Toulouse

Next, we continue to get grimy and nasty. The first major dive into misogyny here
 

There was a band on my suburban block the other day, which was odd. (My neighborhood is not a block party neighborhood. It has a strict HOA. For another time, I suppose.) Anyway, I could hear them clear as a bell in my yard. For some odder reason than existing and being in my neighborhood, they busted into "Heaven" and the crowd all started singing along. I thought it was supremely odd at that point. First off, to be in a band and decide to learn to play Bryan Adams's "Heaven." Secondly, for the crowd to start singing along.
Would have been much cooler if they had played Heaven by Warrant instead.
Even being a big hair metal guy I prefer the Bryan Adams Heaven, I do like some Warrant songs but their hits were definitely cheeseball. But I get it, I think it's a me thing, the earlier Bryan stuff got ahold of me at that middle school age... in any case, by the time Summer of '69 came out and got huge around 1985, I was over it and in discovery of more interesting styles.
 
#27 - Ray Charles - Drown in My Own Tears Spotify

Ray recorded this song as a single in 1956. It was put on his 1957 debut album. I love his vocal delivery on this song, especially when he sings, "you'll be home soon."

He released a live album in 1960 called Ray Charles in Person. He performed at Alonzo Herdon Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, in 1959. It was recorded by a radio station using a single mic. It is a monumental live album, and it was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1999. Here is Drown in My Own Tears from the concert. Spotify
 
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#27 T.N.T (High Voltage)

One of a number of songs I have chosen off of this album. This was released in 1976 and is the first North American release for the band with a mix of songs from 2 earlier Australian releases - High Voltage and T.N.T.

Known for its opening and the multiple Oi’s. I like Bon’s vocal performance in this one with an excellent Angus solo in the middle. Just the right length.

5 songs, 5 different albums. That streak ends Sunday with a song I suspect has some haters.

Album breakdown
0 74 Jailbreak
1 High Voltage
0 Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap
1 Let There Be Rock
1 PowerAge
0 Highway To Hell
1 Back in Black
1 For Those About To Rock (We Salute You)
0 Flick of the Switch
0 Fly On The Wall
0 Who Made Who
0 Blow Up Your Video
0 The Razor’s Edge
0 BallBreaker
0 Stiff Upper Lip
0 Black Ice
0 Rock or Bust
0 Power Up
 
#27. “If You Really Love Me”

Exhibit A on why Stevie Wonder doesn’t get covered very often. His vocal melodies and performances are singular. Sinatra did a few, but they were not good and were when he was deep into his ring a ding dong phase.

Wonder sings the HELL out of this. The arrangement is weird and fun. It’s got that slow-verse, fast-chorus thing everyone thinks grunge invented 20-some years later.
 
“Constructive Summer” is the lead track on what’s probably my favorite album of the last twenty years. Honestly I like their other stuff, particularly live, but in my book, Stay Positive crushes it all. Then again, I also like Reckless
 
The studio version of this song is quirky cool in a juvenile sorta way, but I encourage any that are interested to watch this as well. I wanted to find a way to incorporate Rancid into this list as well and this was the best fit. 2 songs played with Tim Armstrong of Rancid at the House of Blues in Cleveland the day before Green Day was inducted into the RRHOF. One of which was an Operation Ivy cover (Tim Armstrong was in the band) and the other of which was a Rancid song that Billy Joe Armstrong of Green Day co-wrote (he declined an invite to be a permanent member of the band). While I think there are better live versions of Knowledge as this has become a staple of Green Day's live show as they speed it up and frequently bring someone from the crowd up on the stage to play guitar (start at the 6 minute mark) since I watched this live it's the one I chose.
 
Interesting to see one of my favorite Modest Mouse songs come in at 28.
I didn't sequence them by rank---my #31 and #29 are in my top 5-7 favorites.

I tried to sequence them for playlist purposes. This would've been a bit higher if I was ranking, but not by a lot. Still a great song.

I kinda wish I'd just listed them by rank.

Float On is #26?

I'm a casual MM fan so maybe I've been sleeping through their catalog. Looking forward to the next 26. :thumbup:
I've said this 2 or 3 times. You even thumbs upped that explanation I gave above a couple days ago.

Now I really wish I'd just ranked them in order. But, I actually do like several Modest Mouse songs more than Float On :shrug:
DOH! :homer:

In my defense there's an awful lot to follow. :bag:

No fat Jamaicans were harmed in the creation of this list.
 
Also my favorite ...Trail of Dead's song so far as well - so good.

I've said this before but if the Kinks were strictly an 80s band, their catalogue would have been great - but throw in their 60s and 70s output as well and they may be the most under-rated band out there.
Ray Davies has some good solo stuff post-Kinks too.
I love his Americana albums with the Jayhawks as his backing band.
 

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